Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art: The Dinner Party: Heritage Floor: Eustochium

signature image

Francisco de Zurbar├ín. Saint Jerome with Saint Paula and Saint Eustochium, circa 1640–50. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

Eustochium
b. circa 368, Rome; d. 419/420, Bethlehem

Eustochium was a Roman noblewoman and virgin scholar who, with her mother Paula, traveled and studied under the guidance of Jerome, a Christian leader who translated the Bible into Latin from Greek and Hebrew. They lived an ascetic life devoted to spiritual reflection, traveling widely to other ascetic communities and eventually settling in Bethlehem. There they built a monastic community with separate quarters for men and women, Jerome directing the monastery and Paula and Eustochium directing the convents, which housed many women who had taken vows of chastity. After Paula's death, Eustochium supervised the nunneries alone and assisted Jerome with his biblical translations. Around 417, the monastic complex was pillaged and burned by a local mob. Eustochium died shortly after and is currently celebrated by the Roman Catholic Church on September 28, the day of her death.

Related Place Setting

Marcella

Related Heritage Floor Entries

Agrippina I
Agrippina II
Anastasia
Julia Domna
Dorcas
Livia Drusilla
Fabiola
Flavia Julia Helena
Lydia
Macrina
Caelia Macrina
Julia Maesa

Mary Magdalene
Julia Mamaea
Marcellina
Martha of Bethany
Mary of Bethany
Octavia
Paula
Phoebe
Galla Placidia
Plotina
Porcia
Priscilla

SEARCH