Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art: The Dinner Party: Heritage Floor: Puduchepa

signature image

Judy Chicago (American, b. 1939). The Dinner Party (Heritage Floor; detail), 1974–79. Porcelain with rainbow and gold luster, 48 x 48 x 48 ft. (14.6 x 14.6 x 14.6 m). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Foundation, 2002.10. © Judy Chicago. Photograph by Jook Leung Photography

Puduchepa
Flourished circa 1275–1245 B.C., Hittite empire (modern-day Turkey)

The correct spelling of this name is PUDUHEPA.

The Hittite queen Puduhepa, wife of King Hattushili III (ruled circa 1275–1245 B.C.), shared equal yet independent power with her husband, as attested by much documentary evidence. She corresponded with many other kings and queens, including the Egyptian pharaoh Ramesses II, arranging marriages, judicial affairs, and other matters of state. Her seal appears on a wide variety of documents, including disputes over which she presided. The daughter of a priest and herself a priestess, she also had an influence in religious worship in the area, perhaps supervising different cults and their rituals.

Related Place Setting

Hatshepsut

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Nitocris
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