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Street to Studio: The Art of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Presented by JPMorganChase.
Justice and Equality
"I don't think about art when I'm working. I try to think about life." — Jean-Michel Basquiat

What role can art play in our thinking about issues of social justice and equality?
What role does money play in our thinking about social justice and equality?
How does your family's income level affect your place in society?

Image of Per Capita
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Venus from Bronx, Ny, on the Web
I realized that in the "who is Basquiat?" section, it was mentioned that he went to Africa several times, when in fact he only went there once in 1986 with Jennifer Goode, one of his many girlfriends. He had a show there in Abidjan, at the French Cultural Institute. This trip was his first and his last trip to Africa.

And why is it that none of his many girlfriends are ever mentioned?

I also want to point out that Basquiat never visited the Brooklyn Musuem.
He was constantly in the MoMA and hated going anywhere else.

Just wanted to prove some points and share my knowledge.

by the way, I am 16 years old, and a working artist myself.
anaxamander from houston, on the Web
I worry about the commodification of a street artist's work, esp. the Reebok (TM) sneakers that are featured downstairs, scrawled with a Basquiat-like logo -- didn't anyone in the supposedly "liberal" art world here in Houston stop to think that this would be going against some of the most important messages that Jean Michel's work brings to us? Why would you want to connect his art with a sneaker corporation that uses exploited brown hands in Third World countries to make a product for gluttonous U.S. consumers? Check out the painting called "Obnoxious Liberals," and you will see what I am talking about.
Vystnavi from Irving, on the Web

For some reason, this piece of artwork connected me to the people that want equality and justice. It showed me that people deserve the same thing as everyone else. No one should be mistreated or judged by their looks. This artwork was not only inspiring but it is connected to the real world.
Brandon Kilgore from Houston, on the Web
I am very excited that i have had the opurtunity to experience this it has helped my find a piece of myself it has also gave me a chance to expess myself in art without having to feel bad about my drawings because im not talented like i would like to be but i love to draw this has giving me a reason not to hide my way of expression
may from houston, on the Web
You can see his pain,his ups and downs.I have
visited his work 3 times,and everytime I feel
different about how he viewed himself through his
work.You feel his addictions and his growth.
CHARLES from H-TOWN, on the Web
WOW!!!!!!!!!!
this is nice.
and i can feel his pain



im 10 and cute
KILLER1 from WHERE`, on the Web
WHO ARE WE KIDDING.THESE PAINTINGS ARE HORRABLE.IF THEY WERE PAINTED BY ME AND SOMEONE SAID THAT BASQUIAT PAINTED THEM YOU WOULD SAY THEY WERE GREAT.NEVER UNDERESTIMATE THE STUPIDITY OF THE PUBLIC.LOOK AT PROFESSIONAL WRESTLING PEOPLE WILL TELL YOU IT IS NOT STAGED.BASQULAT PAINTINGS ARE REALLY BAD.
Imani from Galveston, on the Web
I thought negroe policemen was the most intriging of all the paintings. It just goes to show what we as a race has gone through. I really enjoyed this exhibit. I never heard og Basquiat before but now I hope to learn more about him