Exhibitions: Constructed Sculpture in Wood

  • 1st Floor
    Arts of Africa, Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden
  • 2nd Floor
    Arts of Asia and the Islamic World
  • 3rd Floor
    Egyptian Art, European Paintings
  • 4th Floor
    Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art
  • 5th Floor
    Luce Center for American Art

On View: Table

American scenery emerged as a powerful national symbol in a number of inventive forms. Artist created topographical images in a variety of m...

Hiroshige's One Hundred Famous Views of Edo

Hiroshige's 118 woodblock landscape and genre scenes of mid-nineteenth-century Tokyo, is one of the greatest achievements of Japanese art.

    On View: Figure of a Reclining Dog

    Buried in a tomb, this charming figure of a dog served as the deceased's beloved companion and guardian in the afterlife. Relief inscription...

     
    Want to add this object to a set? Please join the Posse, or log in.

    close

    PSC_E1992i055.jpg PSC_E1992i054.jpg PSC_E1992i053.jpg PSC_E1992i052.jpg PSC_E1992i051.jpg PSC_E1992i050.jpg PSC_E1992i037.jpg PHO_E1992i007.jpg PHO_E1992i006.jpg PHO_E1992i005.jpg PHO_E1992i004.jpg

    Constructed Sculpture in Wood

    Press Releases ?
    • February 1992: Constructed Sculpture in Wood, an exhibition of 15 contemporary works from the permanent collection, will open at The Brooklyn Museum February 26 in the Lobby Gallery on the first floor and will remain on view through June 7, 1992. Including sculptures by Garth Evans, Heide Fasnacht, Mel Kendrick, Robert Lobe, and Louise Nevelson, the exhibition is the latest in the Curator’s Choice series.

      The term “constructed” relates to the Russian Constructivist movement, which changed the history of modern sculpture and influenced the work of many American artists. It began in the early part of this century when Russian artist Vladimir Tatlin (1895-1956) visited Pablo Picasso’s studio in Paris in 1913 and was fascinated by his first look at Cubism. Later, Tatlin constructed a series of abstract works that are considered the beginnings of Russian Constructivism. The movement’s concerns were with the radical reorganization of sculptural space and volume and corresponded to an ideology based on the attempt to rebuild a society fractured by revolutionary forces.

      The sculptures in this exhibition are the heirs to that movement and display their ties to Constructivism, as well as the diverse possibilities the medium of wood affords. Some artists, such as Hans Hokanson and Robert Lobe, choose to ally wood with its natural, organic associations. Others, like Jane Greengold and Susan Leopold, draw on the tradition of wood’s utilitarian and functional purpose. Several of the artists, including Garth Evans and Ray Rapp, choose to paint the wood and are, therefore, less interested in the wood’s natural surface than in the sculpture’s structure.

      The exhibition has been organized by Brooke Kamin Rapaport, Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art, who was assisted by Tslilit Ben-Navat Servadio, a curatorial intern from New York University’s Museum Studies Program.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1989 - 1994. 01-06/1992, 029-30. View Original 1 . View Original 2

    • May 1992: In the latest program in the Meet the Artist series at The Brooklyn Museum, May 16, 1992, at 3 p.m., children ages six through twelve will participate in a gallery tour and hands-on workshop under the direction of a Museum Educator and nationally acclaimed wood sculptor Robert Lobe (American, b.1945). Lobe will discuss some of the pieces in the Museum’s Curator’s Choice exhibition Constructed Sculpture in Wood, an exhibition of 15 contemporary works from the permanent collection including Lobe’s Tree Supporting Boulder (1977). The exhibition is on view in the Lobby Gallery on the first floor through June 7, 1992.

      Robert Lobe worked primarily in wood through 1977 and then in both wood and aluminum until 1979, when he turned toward his current aluminum sculptures. He works directly from nature, hammering metal over rocks and trees and maintaining his allegiance to wood through his subject matter of trees, branches, stones, and rocks.

      Space is limited; for reservations call (718) 638-5000, ext. 230.

      Meet the Artist programs are made possible, in part, by support from The Louis Calder Foundation and the Moses L. Parshelsky Foundation for the Grace Bachrach Memorial Fund.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1989 - 1994. 01-06/1992, 003-4. View Original 1 . View Original 2

    advanced 108,199 records currently online.

    Separate each tag with a space: painting portrait.

    Or join words together in one tag by using double quotes: "Brooklyn Museum."


    Recently Tagged Exhibitions

    Recent Comments

    "Hi Aimee, I think you mean Oreet Ashery? More information can be found in her profile on the Feminist Art Base: http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/feminist_art_base/gallery/oreet_ashery.php?i=266"
    By shelley

    "Hi, I am trying to find the name of the artist who took and is in the photograph that follows- http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/exhibitions/664/Global_Feminisms_Remix/image/216/Global_Feminisms_Remix._%7C08032007_-_03032008%7C._Installation_view. I believe the artist takes pictures of herself dressed as a man but then exposes her femaleness, as in the photo of her dressed as an Ascetic Jew exposing her breast. Can you help me find her information? Thanks in advance- Aimee Record"
    By Aimee Record

    "For more information on Louis Schanker and the New York Art Scene of the mid 1900's go to http://www.LouisSchanker.info "
    By Lou Siegel

    Join the posse or log in to work with our collections. Your tags, comments and favorites will display with your attribution.


    The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
    For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the informative text panels written by the curator or organizer. Called "didactics," these panels are presented to the public during the exhibition's run, and we reproduce them here for your reference and archival interest. Please note that any illustrations on the original didactics have not been retained, and that the text may contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
    For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the objects from the Brooklyn Museum collection that were in the installation. These objects are listed here for your reference and archival interest, but the list may be incomplete and does not contain objects owned by other institutions or lenders.
    This section utilizes the New York Times API in order to display related materials in New York Times publications.