Exhibitions: Campaign Cartoons

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    Campaign Cartoons

    Press Releases ?
    • October 19, 1940: The Brooklyn Museum’s plans for the greater part of the 1940-41 season and the first part of the 1941-42 season have just been announced.

      The principal exhibitions of the year begin with “Art Finds a Way,” a graphic comment on the subject of skilled work, about which there is so much discussion today, and will demonstrate the great skills man has developed through the years in producing useful objects that have become recognized as objects of art. This exhibition, arranged under the direction of Dr. Herbert J. Spinden, Curator of the Department of American Indian Art and Primitive Cultures, will be made up principally from the Museum’s collections augmented by several loans. It will run from November 1 through January 2.

      Also opening in November is an exhibition of Children’s Clothing, showing the development for the last 125 years and the emergence from slavish copying of adult costume into special designs for the younger generation. Materials for this exhibition will also come principally from the Museum’s collection, enhanced by a few loans. This show is being arranged by Mrs. Michelle Murphy, Supervisor of the Department of Education, and will extend from November 9 through January 12.

      On the 23rd of January, “Paganism and Christianity in Egypt - The Art of Egypt from the First to the Tenth Century,” will open. It will be the first purely Coptic showing arranged in this country. This is being prepared by the Museum’s Department of Egyptology. The exhibition will close on March 9.

      A show for which the Museum is internationally famous, the Biennial Water Color Exhibition, will open on March 27 and close May 11. It will be arranged under the supervision of John I. H. Baur, Curator of the Department of Painting and Sculpture.

      Another exhibition arranged from the Costume collections will be a showing of millinery, past and current, from March 8 through April 20, which will also be arranged by Mrs. Michelle Murphy, Supervisor of the Department of Education.

      The last large exhibition of the season will be made up of art from the printing press, to demonstrate the problems of those who are producing art every day, week and month for the great public, and the process involved in doing so. This exhibition is being arranged by a committee composed of Ralph Halker, architect, George Welp, art director, and Edward A. Wilson, illustrator, together with representatives of the Museum.

      Following the Silk Screen Prints exhibition, arranged by the Print Department, which opened September 20 and will run through October 20, is “The Stage is Set”, running from October 4 through November 17, made up of reproductions of theatre, opera and ballet subjects selected from Library material. As the result of the continual work which is going on in the Photographic Department at the Museum of the printing of negatives from the George B. Brainard Collection of 2,500 views of this part of the country, a third showing of prints will be put on view October 11 and will continue through November 3.

      On the 24th of October the Print Department will hang an exhibition of Current Campaign Cartoons by artists well known in this field, which will continue through December 1. During the same period but opening a day later, October 25, a gift in the form of a group of pressed glass, collected by Mrs. William Greig Walker and presented to the Museum as the result of a subscription fund, will be shown for the first time. The 138 items are all impressed with subjects relating to persons and events that held public interest in the United States, and to some extent in Europe, between 1820 and 1940. The title of the exhibition is “History in Pressed Glass.

      “The Nativity in Art,” made up of reproductions of 15th Century woodcuts and medieval manuscripts, will be put on view November 22 to continue through January 5. This exhibition was arranged by Miss Alice Ford, a member of the Art Reference Library staff. A showing of Recent Accessions will open on December 5 and extend through January 12. In this same period the exhibition called “Forever Young” will be shown. The latter will be composed of illustrations for children’s books, arranged by the Print Department. January 18 through February 2 the annual showing of the work of Brooklyn artists, restricted this year to water colors, will be arranged by John I. H. Baur, Curator of the Department of Painting and Sculpture, and there will be another exhibition in January of other views of Brooklyn and Long Island from the George B. Brainard Collection, from January 9 through February 9.

      For the 1941-42 season the following exhibitions are already planned: Paintings by John Quidor (1801-1881), and also a collection of works by William S. Mount (1807-1868), both arranged by John I. H. Baur, Curator of the Department of Painting and Sculpture; and “Colonial Art of Latin America,” prepared under the supervision of Dr. Herbert J. Spinden, Curator of the Department of American Indian Art and Primitive Cultures.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1939 - 1941. 10-12/1940, 181-3. View Original 1 . View Original 2 . View Original 3

    • October 19, 1940: On Thursday and Friday of next week two new exhibition opens at the Brooklyn Museum to be on view through December 1. The first is “Campaign Cartoons” and the other, “History in Pressed Glass.”

      The cartoon exhibition will be made up of the original drawings by over twenty well-known artists, many of whom are Pulitzer Prize winners for cartoons in the present Presidential campaign, selected for their graphic value.

      “History in Pressed Glass” is the first public showing of the first collection of American and English pressed glass made of commemorative dishes, plates, bowls, and ornaments issued to mark people and events that held public attention between 1820 and 1940. The 137 pieces are known as the Mrs. William Greig Walker Collection. They were assembled by Mrs. Walker and presented to the Museum through a subscription fund made possible by the efforts of Mrs. Ripley Hitchcock and Mrs. Walker.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1939 - 1941. 10-12/1940, 193. View Original

    • October 24, 1940: An exhibition of the original drawings for newspaper cartoons appearing for the current presidential campaign, done by popular American cartoonists from all over the country, is being arranged by the Print Department of the Brooklyn Museum, to be on view from October 24 through December 1. A few cartoons of historic interest from past campaigns will also be included.

      The work is being invited by the Print Department on the basis of its graphic value, and the mediums in which the work is done are charcoal, pencil and pen. The exhibition is being arranged through the cooperation of the artists and with the assistance of newspapers and syndicates. Brooklyn and Manhattan newspapers are giving particularly active help.

      Work has already been definitely arranged for from artists who live in Connecticut, Florida, Iowa, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma and Oregon; and it is expected that there will also be work from Colorado, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Texas, Washington D.C. and Wisconsin. Many of the lending artists have won the Pulitzer Prize for cartoons.

      As many of the cartoons are syndicated, the exhibition will be largely made up of pictures that are known nationally. It will be possible to include cartoons appearing as late as mid-September.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1939 - 1941. 10-12/1940, 158. View Original

    • October 24, 1940: Original drawings by twenty well-known artists, many of them Pulitzer Prize winners, for newspaper cartoons of the our current presidential campaign have been arranged by the Print Department of the Brooklyn Museum as an exhibition opening Thursday, October 24 to extend through December 1. Cartoons as late as October 10 will appear in the show. In nearly every case there will be several examples of each artist’s work.

      Exhibitors who are working on the current campaign and the newspapers in which they appear are as follows: C. D. Batchelor, Daily News, New York (Pulitzer Prize, 1937); C. G. Bennett, New York World Telegram; “Ding” (J. N. Darling), Des Moines Register and Tribune (Pulitzer Prize, 1924); J. H. Donahey, Cleveland Plain Dealer; Edmund Duffy, Baltimore Sun (Pulitzer Prize, 1931 and 1934); W. J. Enright, Miami Herald Tribune; Rube Goldberg, New York Sun; Nelson Harding, Journal-American (Pulitzer Prize, 1927-28); Herbert Johnson, Saturday Evening Post; Rollin Kirby, New York Post (Pulitzer Prize, 1922, 1925, 1929) ; Fred Packer, New York Daily Mirror; Quincy Scott, The Oregonian, Portland Oregon (Pulitzer Honorable Mention, 1937); Vincent A. Svoboda, Brooklyn Eagle; Charles Werner, Daily Oklahoman, Oklahoma City (Pulitzer Prize, 1939); Denys Wortman, New York World Telegram.

      Cartoons from past campaigns will also be included, done by Homer Davenport, F. B. Opper, and T. E. Powers, who were identified with the Hearst publications, and Boardman Robinson, famous for his work on the New York World.

      The drawings will be mounted on stiff backing and shown in a frame, but the entire surface of the paper on which the cartoonist turned in his drawing will be visible, including margin notations and numbers. In this way the public can see the actual condition in which the drawing leaves the artist’s studio. The mediums in nearly every case are charcoal, pencil or pen, or combinations of them.

      The work was invited by the Print Department on the basis of its graphic value, and the exhibition was arranged through the cooperation of the artists and the assistance of newspapers and syndicates. Brooklyn and Manhattan publications have given particularly active help.

      Artists represented in the exhibition are from Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Washington D.C., and Wisconsin.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1939 - 1941. 10-12/1940, 185-6. View Original 1 . View Original 2

    • October 24, 1940: C. D. BATCHELOR - The News, New York
      Don’t worry Wendell he will.
      Perhaps you folks would be surprised if you could see the name on back of Volume 38.
      Mary: Wasn’t it Washington who started the no-third-term tradition.
      But John, there’s no precedent for a third term.
      Kibitzer
      The Writer - The Event
      The Platform

      HOMER DAVENPORT - The New York American
      Fused Vote for U.S.
      He’s good enough for me.

      J. H. DONAHEY - The Cleveland Plain Dealer
      And lo, the likeness is of himself.
      Monkey business
      The Sidewalks of New York
      Oh, just one of those quiet days in the country.

      RUBE GOLDBERG - The New York Sun
      Third Termites

      NELSON HARDING - The New York Journal and American
      Nature Fake
      The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze
      You’ve had your limit.
      Against Wind and Tide
      Driven up against it.

      B. JOHNSTON - The New York World-Telegram
      And why not, Mr. Roosevelt.

      JOHN KNOTT - Dallas Morning News
      Ammunition
      Open Season
      Big Power and Light man.
      Mine is just as good.

      F. OPPER - The New York American
      Recipe for Roast Duck.
      They saw it, they heard it, they beat it.
      Who’ll bell the cat?
      Patriotism is a total loss on Mars.

      T. E. POWERS - The New York Evening Journal
      Down with the Government
      Young GOP Liberals
      Come on Dig Boy
      Purge List
      Oratory School for Young Republicans

      VAUGHN SHOEMAKER - Chicago Daily News
      Burning Ears!

      VINCENT A. SVOBODA — The Brooklyn Eagle
      Rehearsing for his circus.
      The Man of the Hour
      Can they stop it.
      Trying on the new trappings.
      Republican Band Wagon
      It would make a lively race.
      On their way to the circus.
      LaGuardia speaks out.
      A difficult juggling job.
      Four artists commissioned to paint a Willkie Portrait.

      CHARLES WERNER - The Daily Oklahoman
      How to grow a bigger crop of Farm Votes.
      Two Swell Black Eyes
      I am supposed to be a self-made riddle.
      Of course I signed the Hatch Bill!
      He’s down -- he’s up -- he‘s ----
      They’re holding some kind of convention in Chicago.
      Consternation at the Smear Willkie Headquarters.
      Dynamite?

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1939 - 1941. 10-12/1940, 187-8. View Original 1 . View Original 2

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    Prints, Drawings and Photographs

    Over the years, the collections of the Brooklyn Museum have been organized and reorganized in different ways. Collections of the former Department of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs include works on paper that may fall into other categories: American Art, European Art, Asian Art, Contemporary Art, and Photography.
    The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
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