Exhibitions: Western Hemisphere Children's Art

  • 1st Floor
    Arts of Africa, Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden
  • 2nd Floor
    Arts of Asia and the Islamic World
  • 3rd Floor
    Egyptian Art, European Paintings
  • 4th Floor
    Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art
  • 5th Floor
    Luce Center for American Art

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    Western Hemisphere Children's Art

    Press Releases ?
    • March 14, 1942: On Saturday, March 21, the Brooklyn Museum, in cooperation with the Progressive Education Association, will open an exhibition of the children’s art which was assembled for the 8th International Conference of the New Education Fellowship. Unlike the exhibition shown at the previous NEP Conference, which included materials from all parts of the world, this exhibition concentrates on the work of children in the Western Hemisphere. The Latin American section was assembled, with the assistance of the State Department, by friends of the Progressive Education Association in Latin America. The exhibition will remain on view at the Museum through Sunday, April 19.

      Following the close of the showing at the Museum, the pictures will be exhibited in Washington in connection with the invitation conference, at the White House, on Children in the Western Hemisphere.

      Because of their content, the exhibits are of interest to the general public as well as to art teachers and students, for the life of each country represented is reflected in the pictures. Therefore, the Museum feels that it is especially fitted to present
      this exhibition in view of its experience in the field of child education, and in view of its policy of furthering an understanding among the peoples of the Americas; a policy inaugurated last autumn with the pioneer exhibition, “America South of U.S.”

      The exhibition at the Museum will formally open on Saturday, March 21, with a conference for teachers and others professionally interested, jointly sponsored by the Museum and the Progressive Education Association. The conference will begin with a general session at 11:00 A.M., Frederick L. Redefer, Director, Progressive Education Association, presiding. Dr. Herbert J. Spinden, Curator of American Indian Art and Primitive Cultures at the Brooklyn Museum, will speak on “Latin and Anglo America.” The general session will be followed by a luncheon meeting at 12:30 P.M., with Principal Henry Hein, of the James Monroe High School, as Chairman. The speaker at this luncheon meeting will be Miss Concho Romero James, of the Pan American Union.

      In the afternoon, from 2:15 to 3:45, five conference seminars will be held for teachers interested in developing studies of Latin America in their classes. Chairman of these seminars are: Mr. F. Tredwell Smith, of the Dalton High School; Theodore Huebener, Director of Foreign Languages, New York City Public Schools, whose group will be addressed by Mr. Hyman Alpern, Evander Childs High School; Miss Getrude Selkowe, P.S. 191; Mr. Benjamin J. R. Stolper, of the Lincoln School; Miss Virginia Murphy, Director of Art, New York City Public Schools, whose seminar will be addressed by Miss Ruth Reeves, American artist and designer, and Guggenheim Fellow to Latin America.
      (Copy of the program is enclosed)

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1942 - 1946. 01-03/1942, 064-5. View Original 1 . View Original 2

    • March 20, 1942: An exhibition of art by children of the Western Hemisphere opens at the Brooklyn Museum on Saturday, March 21. The exhibition will remain on view at the Museum through Sunday, April 19.

      This exhibition, which is presented by the Museum in co-operation with the Progressive Education Association, was assembled with the assistance of the State Department for the 8th International Conference of the New Education Fellowship, sponsored by the Office of the Co-ordinator of Inter-American Affairs. Unlike the work at the previous NEP Conference, which included material from all parts of the world, this exhibition concentrates of the work of the children in the Western Hemisphere. Because of their content, the exhibits are of interest to the general public as well as to art teachers and students, since the pictures reflect the life of each country represented. Because of its experience in the field of child education, and because of its experience in furthering an understanding among the peoples of the Americas, the Brooklyn Museum is especially fitted to present this exhibition.

      The exhibits cover a large range of media, including oil, water color, crayon, woodcut and pencil. The pictures are shown by country and each exhibit is marked with the age of the child artist.

      On the opening day of the exhibition a conference for teachers and others professionally interested will be held at the Museum, from 11 A.M. to 3:45 P.M. This conference is jointly sponsored by the Brooklyn Museum and the Progressive Education Association. (Copy of PROGRAM attached.)

      Following the close of the exhibition at the Museum, the children’s pictures will be exhibited in Washington in connection with the invitation conference, at the White House, on children in the Western Hemisphere.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1942 - 1946. 01-03/1942, 071. View Original

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    Education Division

    The Brooklyn Museum's Education Division, which organizes classes and educational programs for children and adults, had its roots in the educational work of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences in the 1890s. Shows of work by students and exhibitions of special interest to students have always been part of the Museum's educational activities.
    The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
    For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the informative text panels written by the curator or organizer. Called "didactics," these panels are presented to the public during the exhibition's run, and we reproduce them here for your reference and archival interest. Please note that any illustrations on the original didactics have not been retained, and that the text may contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
    For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the objects from the Brooklyn Museum collection that were in the installation. These objects are listed here for your reference and archival interest, but the list may be incomplete and does not contain objects owned by other institutions or lenders.
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