Exhibitions: Revolution and Tradition

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    Arts of Asia and the Islamic World
  • 3rd Floor
    Egyptian Art, European Paintings
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    Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art
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    Luce Center for American Art

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    Revolution and Tradition

    • Dates: November 15, 1951 through January 6, 1952
    • Collections: American Art
    Press Releases ?
    • November 15, 1951: The Brooklyn Museum’s major fall exhibition surveying the chief trends in American painting during the last fifty years will open to the public November 15 after a private viewing on the preceding evening for Museum members. Press preview will be Tuesday and Wednesday, November 13 and 14, from 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. The show will run through January 6.

      Entitled REVOLUTION AND TRADITION, the exhibition is divided into six sections, each tracing the development of a major. Movement in our modern American art, or in some cases two which are closely allied. The show is divided equally between the “advanced” movements, expressionism, abstraction and surrealism, and the traditional movements which have survived from the 19th century as the various kinds of realism, romanticism and impressionism, In all, 150 paintings will be shown in the Museum’s Entrance Hall and special exhibition galleries.

      The main purpose of the exhibition is to reveal the complex but perceptible order underlying the great diversity of our modern painting. The emphasis is, not on the individual artist but on those broad paths which many painters have followed, despite great personal differences. It is the Museum’s belief that much of the confusion caused by modern art in the public mind nay be dispelled by showing the common: interests, aims, attitudes and methods that have bound large groups of our artists together and given a common direction to their work.

      While it has not been possible to indicate in the hanging of the exhibition the many cross influences which have operated between the various movements, the principal ones have been pointed out in catalogue notes.

      The six sections of the exhibition, installed in the following order, are devoted to: Expressionism, Abstract Art, Dada and Surrealism, Impressionism and Romantic Realism, Realists and Primitives, Romantic Visionaries. Within each section the order is roughly chronological. In the sections dealing with traditional styles, 19th century paintings have been included to show the sources from which these grew or to which they are related.

      While the exhibition does not pretend to be an inclusive history of 20th century American painting, it is the first attempt to clarify the main directions in our art during this turbulent and varied period.

      The exhibition is based on the recently published book, Revolution and Tradition in Modern American Art (Harvard University Press), a volume in the Library of Congress Series in American Civilization by John I.H. Baur, the Museum’s Curator of Paintings, who is also responsible for the show. An illustrated catalogue defining the various movements and providing brief notes on their development has been published by the Brooklyn Museum.

      Aside from many pictures lent by private collectors and from the Brooklyn Museum Collection paintings were borrowed from about fifty galleries and museums throughout the country.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1947 - 1952. 04-06/1951, 076-7. View Original 1 . View Original 2

    • Date unknown, approximately 1951: REVOLUTION AND TRADITION, an exhibition tracing the chief movements in American painting from 1900 to the present, will open at The Brooklyn Museum November 15 and run through January 6.

      Press Preview will be Tuesday, November 13, but photographs of most of the paintings are already available.

      The exhibition is based on the book, “Revolution and Tradition in Modern American Art” by John I. H. Baur, the Museum’s Curator of Paintings and Sculpture, which will be published October 11th by the Harvard University Press. It is the first volume to appear in the newly announced Library of Congress Series in American Civilization, edited by Professor Ralph H. Gabriel of Yale.

      Like the book, the exhibition will be divided into sections, each devoted to a separate movement in 20th century American art. Most of the 150 paintings to be shown are those illustrated in the book. There will also be a smaller catalogue published by the Museum.

      REVOLUTION AND TRADITION will be the Museum’s major exhibition of the fall season. Further details will be given in a later release.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1947 - 1952. 10-12/1951, 090. View Original

    • Date unknown, approximately 1951: On Wednesday, November 28th at 4 P.M., at the Brooklyn Museum, three distinguished speakers will discuss ways in which the revolutionary and traditional movements in American art during the last fifty years have affected each other. Specifically they will examine the influence of surrealism, abstract art and expressionism on our various kinds of native realism and romanticism—and vice versa.

      American art of the past fifty years has been partly revolutionary, partly traditional. From Nov. 15th to Jan. 6th, the Museum is holding a large loan exhibition, REVOLUTION AND TRADITION, which surveys the chief movements of both kinds and the direction of American painting in the 20th century, but more than that it demonstrates that our modern art is the richer for its diversity--that much genuinely creative work was and is still being done in both the “advanced” and more conservative forms of expression.

      For those who are concerned with the present and future directions of American painting, the symposium should shed new light on one of the principal factors in its development.

      THE SPEAKERS
      George H. Hamilton, Yale University on SURREALISM AND NATIVE TRADITION
      Dr. H.W. Janson, New York University, School of Fine Arts on EXPRESSIONISM AND NATIVE TRADITION
      Thomas B. Hess, Editor, The Art News on EXPRESSIONISM AND NATIVE TRADITION
      Chairman John I.H. Baur, Curator of Paintings & Sculpture, The Brooklyn Museum

      ADMISSION 50 cents (25 cents to Museum members)

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1947 - 1952. 10-12/1951, 105. View Original

    • Winter approximately 1951: On Sunday, December 2, 1951 at 2:00 P.M. The Brooklyn Museum will present Nicki Galpeer, Soprano and Philip Bond, Basso assisted by Arpad Sandor, pianist in the Sculpture Court of the Brooklyn Museum.

      The program will be:

      Four Serious Songs; Brahms; Philip Bond
      Chansons deBilities; Debussy
      Dona Janaina; Mignone
      Vai Azulao; Guarnieri
      Dem Bao; Guarnieri
      Triste; Ginestra
      El Gato; Ginestra
      Nicki Galpeer

      INTERMISSION

      *Dover Beach; Samuel Barber; Philip Bond
      Apple Tree; Morgenstern
      Why So Pale and Wan, Fond Love; Dello Joio
      Meeting at Night; Dello Joio
      *Black Swan (from Medium); Menotti
      The Junk Man; Swanson
      Joy; Swanson

      Nicki Galpeer
      THE ARTIST
      NICKI GALPEER, American-born soprano, is well-known for her concert and radio appearances. During her student days at the Juilliard School of Music, she became interested in South American music. After work with Camargo Guanieri, the Brazilian composer, she sang his works at concerts in New York and Washington. Mme. Galpeer has been invited to sing with symphony orchestras in South American this year. Her next New York concert will be at Town Hall on December 16th.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1947 - 1952. 10-12/1951, 108. View Original

    • Winter approximately 1951: One Sunday, Decemberr 30, 1951 at 2:00 P.M. The Brooklyn Museum will present Helen Lightner, Soprano, Paul Bellam, violinist assisted by Arpad Sandor, pianist, in the Sculpture Court of the Brooklyn Musuem.

      The program will be:

      Theme and Variations; Dello Joio; Paul Bellam
      Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen; Mabler; Helen Lightner

      INTERMISSION

      *Tell Me, Thyrsus (J. Dryden); Paul Nordoff; Helen Lightner
      This Is The Shape of the Leaf (C. Altken); Helen Lightner
      Serenade (K. Millay); A. Walter Kramer
      Swans (Sara Teasdale); A. Walter Kramer
      Sleep Now (James Joyce); Samuel Barber
      I Hean An Army (James Joyce); Samuel Barber; Helen Lightner
      Poeme; Chausson; Paul Bellam
      Bulgarian Rhapsody; Vladigeroff; Paul Bellam

      THE ARTISTS
      HELEN LICHTNER is a native of Portugal, Oregon where she received her early musical training. She has appeared in concert and on the air throughout the west, as a guest artist with the Stradivarius Society and on January 27th will be a guest artist for the New Friends of Music in a performance of Purcell’s “Dido and Aeneas”. Miss Lightner has given two successful Town Hall recitals and will appear in her third New York recital on January 31st.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1947 - 1952. 10-12/1951, 115. View Original

    • Date unknown, approximately 1952: Fifty Years of American Music in connection with the current Exhibit “Revolution and Tradition”

      On Sunday, January 6, 1952 at 2:00 P.M. The Brooklyn Museum will [illegible] Margaret Pardee, violinist [illegible] by David Garvey [illegible] Pianist [illegible]

      The program will [illegible]

      Sonata in A Major                  Vivaldi
      Preludio-Corrente-Recitative-Giga

      Sonata in G Major, K.301              Mozart
      Allegro con spirito
      Allegro

      Sonata in D Minor, Opus 104            Brahms
      Allegro
      Adagio
      Un poco Presto con Sentimento
      Presto agitato

      INTERMISSION

      *Cubhagita (first performance)            Price-Romeike

      Poeme            Chausson

      Nocturne from “Masquerade”            Khachaturian

      Moses Fantasy (for G String)            Paganini

      Roumanian Folk Dances            Bartok

      THE ARTIST

      MARGARET PARDEE, a native of Georgia, began study of the violin at an early age with her mother, Frances B. Pardee. She continued her musical training at the Juilliard School of Music, where she studied on scholarship at the Institute of Musical Art, and on Fellowship at the Juilliard Graduate School. She has studied with Sascha Jacobsen, Albert Spalding, Louis Persinger, and Ivan Galamian. She has concertized extensively throughout the United States, both as solo recitalist and in ensemble groups. Her Town Hall Debut will be on January 11th, Friday evening, at 8:30.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1947 - 1952. 01-03/1952, 002. View Original

    • Date unknown, approximately 1952: Fifty Years of American Music in connection with the current Exhibit “Revolution and Tradition"

      On Sunday, January 13, 1952 at 2:00 P.M. The Brooklyn Museum will present Selma Schechtman, pianist in the Sculpture Court of the Brooklyn Museum.

      The program will be:

      Organ Prelude in G Minor      Bach-Siloti

      Two Sonatas:      Scarlatti
      F Major-Pastoral
      D Minor-Gavotte

      Abegg Variations, Opus 1      Schumann

      Sonata in C Major, Opus 53 (Waldstein)      Beethoven
      Allegro con trio
      Introduzione-Adagio molto
      Rondo-Allegretto moderato

      INTERMISSION

      *The Cat and the Mouse      Copland

      Sonata No. 3      Hindemith
      With quiet motion
      Very lively
      Moderately fast
      Fugue-lively

      Ballade No. 2 in F Major                  )      Chopin
      Nocturne in D Flat, Opus 27 No. 2)

      Valse Cubiee                          )
      Hungarian Rhapsody, No. 6)      Liszt

      THE ARTIST

      SELMA SCHECHTMAN, young American pianist, was born in New York City. Her early training was with Stephanie Shehatovich in piano and Max Persin in theory and counterpoint. This was followed by a scholarship to the Juilliard School of Mu[sic] where she studied with Mme. Rosina Lhevinne. Upon graduation, she was awarded the D. Hendrick Ezerman Foundation Scholarship at the Philadelphia Conservatory where she studied with Edward Steuermann. At present she is coaching with Isador Philipp. Her next New York appearance will be at Town Hall on Sunday evening, January 20th.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1947 - 1952. 01-03/1952, 001. View Original

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    The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
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