Exhibitions: National Print Exhibition, 06th Annual

  • 1st Floor
    Arts of Africa, Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden
  • 2nd Floor
    Arts of Asia and the Islamic World
  • 3rd Floor
    Egyptian Art, European Paintings
  • 4th Floor
    Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art
  • 5th Floor
    Luce Center for American Art

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    National Print Exhibition, 06th Annual

    Press Releases ?
    • March 17, 1952: The Brooklyn Museum’s 6th National Print Annual Exhibition, the only completely juried print show in the Metropolitan area and one of the major print exhibits in the United States, will open to the public on March 19. A preview for exhibiting artists, museum members and guests will be held on the afternoon of March 19. The exhibit will continue through May 18.

      Two hundred prints were chosen from over 1200 entries by a jury composed of:

      Belle Krasne, Editor, The Art Digest
      Karl Kup, Curator of Prints,The New York Public Library
      Ezio Martinelli, artist and teacher, Sarah Lawrence College
      Una E. Johnson, Curator of Prints, The Brooklyn Museum (ex-Officio)

      Prize winners will be announced later.

      Artists from every section of the United States are represented. The exhibit reflects not only the many facets of contemporary printmaking, but also shows the development of a new and expanding way of seeing - in fact, a changing visual vocabulary. Freshness, exuberance, boldness, experimentation are everywhere apparent in the exhibition.

      An illustrated catalog is available.

      Selections from the exhibit will be circulated throughout the United States by the American Federation of Arts as in previous years.

      All prints on Exhibition are for sale.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1947 - 1952. 01-03/1952, 015. View Original

    • March 18, 1952: Prize winners in the 6th National Print Annual opening to the public at the Brooklyn Museum Exhibition, tomorrow were announced today. The Thirteen American artists honored include several from the metropolitan area. Their work has been purchased by the Museum and will become part of the Museum’s permanent collection.

      They are Arnold Abramson of Jamaica, N.Y., Will Barnet and Robert Conover, of New York City, Danny Pierce of Brooklyn and Walter R. Rogalski of Glen Cove, N.Y. (The complete list includes Harry Brorby, Iowa City, Ia., Leonard Edmondson, Pasadena, Calif., John Livingston Ihle, Chicago, Ill., Gabor Peterdi Rowayton, Conn., Sue Rovelstad, Bloomfield Hills, Mich., Phyllis Sherman, Iowa City, Ia., J.L. Steg, New Yorleans, Ia., and Adja Yunkers, Alameda, N.M.

      A JURIED SHOW

      The show, a completely juried one, includes 200 prints which were chosen from more than 1200 entries. Artists from every section of the United States are represented, with the exhibit forcefully reflecting dramatic developments in this art.

      Miss Una Johnson, curator of prints and drawings for the museum, stated that the show is one of the finest to date.

      Printmaking is one of the most exciting fields in art today. The artist is using great inventiveness here -- everything from razor blades to power tools are being tried in the effort to create. And these artists are young -- most of them in their early 20’s and 30’s.”

      Miss Johnson explained that the artists are working with a sense of security. Many are veterans and they’ve dedicated their privileges under the GI Bill of Rights to art education.

      “Our American artists have freedom, and comparative security, and they are rediscovering and re-applying the ever-widening means of expression through engraving, etching, woodcut, lithography and serigraphy,” she said.

      PRINTS ARE FOR SALE

      To support the American artist, The Brooklyn Museum as a public service, makes the prints readily available to the public. Prices are marked on all exhibited pieces and these range from $5 to $50. The complete purchase price goes to the artist.

      “I feel that a print is one of the finest art investments that can be made. At a very modest price, a person obtains an original work of art, signed by the artist,” she said.

      The prints are limited editions of 9, 10, 11 and sometimes 25.

      The exhibition will continue through May 18.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1947 - 1952. 01-03/1952, 019-20. View Original 1 . View Original 2

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    Prints, Drawings and Photographs

    Over the years, the collections of the Brooklyn Museum have been organized and reorganized in different ways. Collections of the former Department of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs include works on paper that may fall into other categories: American Art, European Art, Asian Art, Contemporary Art, and Photography.
    The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
    For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the informative text panels written by the curator or organizer. Called "didactics," these panels are presented to the public during the exhibition's run, and we reproduce them here for your reference and archival interest. Please note that any illustrations on the original didactics have not been retained, and that the text may contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
    For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the objects from the Brooklyn Museum collection that were in the installation. These objects are listed here for your reference and archival interest, but the list may be incomplete and does not contain objects owned by other institutions or lenders.
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