Exhibitions: Permanent Collection: A Site-Specific Work by German Artists

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    Arts of Africa, Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden
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  • 3rd Floor
    Egyptian Art, European Paintings
  • 4th Floor
    Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art
  • 5th Floor
    Luce Center for American Art

On View: Not at Home

The painting’s title may seem curious, especially since there is clearly someone in this comfortably furnished domestic interior. In t...

Hiroshige's One Hundred Famous Views of Edo

Hiroshige's 118 woodblock landscape and genre scenes of mid-nineteenth-century Tokyo, is one of the greatest achievements of Japanese art.

    On View: Not at Home

    The painting’s title may seem curious, especially since there is clearly someone in this comfortably furnished domestic interior. In t...

     

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    Permanent Collection: A Site-Specific Work by German Artists

    Press Releases ?
    • Date unknown, 1987: Permanent Collection, a conceptual work by three West German artists intended as a commentary on the confrontation between past and present, will be on view at The Brooklyn Museum from November 8, 1987, through January 4, 1988. The work is a site-specific project comprising three individual sculptural pieces installed in different locations in the Museum’s third floor Court and surrounding ambulatory, which displays Egyptian and Classical art. The artists, Bogomir Ecker of Dusseldorf and Raimund Kummer and Hermann Pitz of Berlin, were inspired by both the variety of the Museum’s vast permanent holdings and its distinctive architecture.

      Ecker, Kummer and Pitz, who have collaborated on a number of site-specific works in Germany, including pieces for the former Hebbeltheater in Berlin, the Kunstforum Lenbachhaus in Munich and Jenisch-Park in Hamburg, first became interested in The Brooklyn Museum as a project site about three years ago. “We perceive the Museum as a time trap, a time tunnel which brings together the witnesses of different eras,” they write. “This collision within the Museum demands the presence of the present.”

      The three sculptural works are an oversized pair of cast aluminum opera glasses; a large, triangular table meant not only to be used as a visual vantage point but to be viewed as a formal abstraction; and a piece entitled Ear-Plugs that comprises two large, pillow-shaped objects and a vitrine containing a mock art object.

      According to Laural Weintraub, Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art for the Museum and co-coordinator of the project, Permanent Collection, despite its title, is about temporary conditions, lightness, humor and impermanence as opposed to monumentality, solemnity and eternity. This dynamic confrontation between the weighty past and the evanescent present will no doubt spur some serious thought about the role and significance of contemporary art.

      This project is co-sponsored by the Goethe Institut of Munich, the Berlin Senate of Cultural Affairs and Lufthansa German Airlines as part of Berlin Events, a program of Goethe House in October and November 1987.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1971 - 1988. 1987, 099-100. View Original 1 . View Original 2

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      Recent Comments

      "Hi Aimee, I think you mean Oreet Ashery? More information can be found in her profile on the Feminist Art Base: http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/feminist_art_base/gallery/oreet_ashery.php?i=266"
      By shelley

      "Hi, I am trying to find the name of the artist who took and is in the photograph that follows- http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/exhibitions/664/Global_Feminisms_Remix/image/216/Global_Feminisms_Remix._%7C08032007_-_03032008%7C._Installation_view. I believe the artist takes pictures of herself dressed as a man but then exposes her femaleness, as in the photo of her dressed as an Ascetic Jew exposing her breast. Can you help me find her information? Thanks in advance- Aimee Record"
      By Aimee Record

      "For more information on Louis Schanker and the New York Art Scene of the mid 1900's go to http://www.LouisSchanker.info "
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      The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
      For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the informative text panels written by the curator or organizer. Called "didactics," these panels are presented to the public during the exhibition's run, and we reproduce them here for your reference and archival interest. Please note that any illustrations on the original didactics have not been retained, and that the text may contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
      For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the objects from the Brooklyn Museum collection that were in the installation. These objects are listed here for your reference and archival interest, but the list may be incomplete and does not contain objects owned by other institutions or lenders.
      This section utilizes the New York Times API in order to display related materials in New York Times publications.