Exhibitions: Click! A Crowd-Curated Exhibition

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    Arts of Asia and the Islamic World
  • 3rd Floor
    Egyptian Art, European Paintings
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    Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art
  • 5th Floor
    Luce Center for American Art

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    DIG_E2008_Click_005_PS2.jpg DIG_E2008_Click_003_PS2.jpg DIG_E2008_Click_004_PS2.jpg DIG_E2008_Click_002_PS2.jpg DIG_E2008_Click_001_PS2.jpg

    Click! A Crowd-Curated Exhibition

    • Dates: June 27, 2008 through August 10, 2008
    • Collections: Photography
    • Location: This exhibition is no longer on view on the 2nd Floor
    • Description: Click! A Crowd-Curated Exhibition. [06/27/2008 - 08/10/2008]. Installation view.
    • Citation: Brooklyn Museum. Digital Collections and Services (DIG_E_2008_Click)
    • Source: born digital
    • Related Links: Main Exhibition Page
    Press Releases ?
    • April 2008: Click! A Crowd-Curated Exhibition is a photography installation that invites Brooklyn Museum’s visitors, the online community, and the general public to participate in the exhibition process. The installation will be on view from June 27–August 10, 2008, at the Brooklyn Museum.

      Taking its inspiration from the critically acclaimed book The Wisdom of Crowds, in which New Yorker business and financial columnist James Surowiecki asserts that a diverse crowd is often wiser at making decisions than expert individuals, Click! explores whether Surowiecki’s premise can be applied to the visual arts—is a diverse crowd just as “wise” at evaluating art as the trained experts? Click! is an exhibition in three consecutive parts.

      It began with an open call—artists were asked to electronically submit a work of photography in response to the exhibition’s theme, “Changing Faces of Brooklyn,” along with an artist statement. The open call was scheduled from March 1–31, 2008.

      After the conclusion of the open call, an online forum opened for audience evaluation of all submissions; as in other juried exhibitions, all works are displayed anonymously. As part of the evaluation, each visitor answers a series of questions about his/her knowledge of art and perceived expertise. The online forum is open April 1–May 23, 2008.

      Click! culminates in an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, where the photographs will be installed according to their relative ranking from the juried process. Visitors will also be able to see how different groups within the crowd evaluated the same works of art. The results will be analyzed and discussed by experts in the fields of art, online communities, and crowd theory. The installation will be on view from June 27–August 10, 2008.

      Click! A Crowd-Curated Exhibition
      is organized by Shelley Bernstein, Manager of Information Systems, Brooklyn Museum.

      Image Requests: Due to the fact that this is a crowd-curated exhibition, there will be no press images available for Click! until May 24, 2008. The Click! logo is available through the press office. If your piece is online, you can install the Click! widget at any time from the following Web address: http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/click/promote/

      View Original

    • June 2008: Click! A Crowd-Curated Exhibition, featuring photographs curated by 3,344 members of the public during an innovative online jury process, will be on view at Brooklyn Museum starting June 27 through August 10, 2008. Click! began in March with an open call inviting artists to submit a work of photography in response to the exhibition’s theme, “Changing Faces of Brooklyn.” Three hundred eighty-nine photographers responded by electronically submitting one image, accompanied by a 100-word artist statement, via the Brooklyn Museum Web site. At the conclusion of the open call, the general public was asked to evaluate the submissions during a six-week period using the Web site.

      The inspiration for the exhibition comes from the critically acclaimed book The Wisdom of Crowds, in which New Yorker business and financial columnist James Surowiecki asserts that a diverse crowd is often wiser at making decisions than expert individuals. Click! explores Surowiecki’s central idea in the context of visual art.

      In accordance with Surowiecki’s theories, the evaluation tool was designed to promote objectivity and minimize peer influence: each of the 389 photographs was displayed without artist attribution and at random for each evaluator, and artists were unable to forward links of individual submissions to friends and family. A diverse crowd of international evaluators—not only from Brooklyn, but across the U.S. and beyond—submitted more than 400,000 individual responses to the photographs and left more than 3,000 comments during the process. Click! will culminate in an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, where the photographs will be installed according to their relative ranking by the crowd of curators.

      Brooklyn Museum clicks with the crowd at FIGMENT 2008, a celebration of participatory art creative culture held on Governors Island. A panel discussion about the process and outcome of Click! will be held on Saturday, June 28, at 11 a.m. Panelists include James Surowiecki, New Yorker financial columnist and author of The Wisdom of Crowds; Jeff Howe, contributing editor of Wired magazine, who coined the term “crowdsourcing”; Eugenie Tsai, Brooklyn Museum’s John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art; and Shelley Bernstein, Brooklyn Museum’s Manager of Information Systems and the organizer of Click! The panel will be moderated by Nicole Caruth, Brooklyn Museum’s Manager of Interpretive Materials and a freelance writer and curator based in Brooklyn.

      Click! A Crowd-Curated Exhibition is organized by Shelley Bernstein, Manager of Information Systems, Brooklyn Museum.

      View Original

    Press Coverage of this Exhibition ?

    • ART REVIEW; 3,344 People May Not Know Art but Know What They LikeJuly 4, 2008 By KEN JOHNSON"If you ask 100 people to guess the number of jelly beans in a big glass jar, few will come close. The average of their guesses, however, will be almost exactly right. That, in a nutshell, is the lesson of ''The Wisdom of Crowds,'' the best-selling book by James Surowiecki, The New Yorker magazine's business columnist. When it comes to quantifiable..."
    • INSIDE THE TIMES: July 4, 2008July 4, 2008 "INTERNATIONAL JAPAN HOPES TO TAKE LEAD In Conservation Efforts After the energy crises of the 1970s, Japan forced itself to conserve with government-mandated energy-efficiency targets and steep taxes on petroleum. Now, with oil prices hitting dizzying levels and the world struggling to deal with global warming, it is hoping to use its conservation..."
    • The Listings: ArtJuly 11, 2008 By THE NEW YORK TIMES"ART Museums and galleries are in Manhattan unless otherwise noted. Full reviews of recent art shows: nytimes.com/art. PETER SARKISIAN This artist is best known for projecting videos of naked subjects onto the four sides of Minimalist Plexiglas boxes, with results that are mesmerizing as technology but thin and somewhat maudlin as art. In his..."
    • Museum and Gallery ListingsJuly 18, 2008 By THE NEW YORK TIMES"ART Museums and galleries are in Manhattan unless otherwise noted. Full reviews of recent art shows: nytimes.com/art. Museums AMERICAN FOLK ART MUSEUM: 'ASA AMES: OCCUPATION SCULPTURING,' through Sept. 14. This first show devoted to the American sculptor Asa Ames (1823-1851) is a gem. Its eight carved and painted wood portraits -- roughly..."
    • The ListingsJuly 25, 2008 "ART Museums and galleries are in Manhattan unless otherwise noted. Full reviews of recent art shows: nytimes.com/art. Museums AMERICAN FOLK ART MUSEUM: 'ASA AMES: OCCUPATION SCULPTURING,' through Sept. 14. This first show devoted to the American sculptor Asa Ames (1823-51) is a gem. Its eight carved and painted wood portraits -- roughly two-thirds..."
    • Museum and Gallery ListingsJuly 25, 2008 By THE NEW YORK TIMES"ART Museums and galleries are in Manhattan unless otherwise noted. Full reviews of recent art shows: nytimes.com/art. Museums AMERICAN FOLK ART MUSEUM: 'ASA AMES: OCCUPATION SCULPTURING,' through Sept. 14. This first show devoted to the American sculptor Asa Ames (1823-51) is a gem. Its eight carved and painted wood portraits -- roughly two-thirds..."
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