Exhibitions: The Mummy Chamber

  • 1st Floor
    Arts of Africa, Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden
  • 2nd Floor
    Arts of Asia and the Islamic World
  • 3rd Floor
    Egyptian Art, European Paintings
  • 4th Floor
    Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art
  • 5th Floor
    Luce Center for American Art

Hiroshige's One Hundred Famous Views of Edo

Hiroshige's 118 woodblock landscape and genre scenes of mid-nineteenth-century Tokyo, is one of the greatest achievements of Japanese art.

    On View: Colonel Robert J. Milligan House Parlor

    This parlor and library are from the house still standing in Saratoga Springs, New York, built by Robert J. Milligan in 1854–56 and il...

     

    Login to play

    Login with Google ID

    Forgot your password?

    Not a Posse member? Register

    Brooklyn Museum Posse:
    Exploring the collection

    When you join the posse, your tags comments and favorites will display with your attribution and save to your profile.

    Want to add this object to a set? Please join the Posse, or log in.

    close

    DIG_E_2010_Mummy_Chamber_01_PS2.jpg DIG_E_2013_Mummy_Chamber_09_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2013_Mummy_Chamber_10_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2010_Mummy_Chamber_08_PS2.jpg DIG_E_2010_Mummy_Chamber_07_PS2.jpg DIG_E_2010_Mummy_Chamber_06_PS2.jpg DIG_E_2010_Mummy_Chamber_05_PS2.jpg DIG_E_2010_Mummy_Chamber_04_PS2.jpg DIG_E_2010_Mummy_Chamber_03_PS2.jpg DIG_E_2010_Mummy_Chamber_02_PS2.jpg

    The Mummy Chamber

    Press Releases ?
    • November 30, 2009: An installation of more than 170 objects selected from the Brooklyn Museum’s world-famous holdings of ancient Egyptian material explores the complex rituals related to the practice of mummification and the Egyptian belief that the body must be preserved in order to ensure eternal life. The Mummy Chamber will open at the Brooklyn Museum on May 5 and will remain on long-term view.

      Included in the installation will be a portion of the nearly 26-foot-long papyrus Book of the Dead of Sobekmose, acquired in 1937 and never before on public view, which has undergone more than two years of conservation. Other segments of this extraordinary document, which contains spells to aid the dead in the afterlife, will be added to the gallery installation as they are conserved. Throughout the more than 3,000-year-old papyrus, which contains text on both sides as well as illustrations, Sobekmose’s name recurs frequently, accompanied by the title “Gold-worker of Amun.”

      The Mummy Chamber provides a look at the Museum’s collection of wrapped human and animal mummies. In addition, containers that physically protected the mummies will demonstrate the history of coffin making for humans and animals in Egypt, along with objects that illustrate the ancient Egyptians’ corporal and supernatural methods for protecting the mummy from harm and for ensuring a pleasant afterlife.

      On view will be the mummy of the Royal Prince, Count of Thebes, Pa-seba-khai-en-ipet, and the mummy of Hor, encased in an elaborately painted cartonnage. Also in the installation will be canopic jars used to store vital organs of a mummy, as well as several shabtis, small figurines placed in tombs, each of which was assigned to “work” in the afterlife. The installation will include related objects, among them stelae, reliefs, gold earrings, amulets, ritual statuettes, coffins, and mummy boards.

      In recent years, several of the human and animal mummies in the Brooklyn Museum have undergone a rigorous scientific testing, including CT scanning at North Shore University Hospital, to determine new information such as the sex, age, and living habits. Some of these findings will be made available in the installation.

      The presentation will examine the various processes of mummification available to ancient Egyptians’ depending on the budget of the deceased. The most expensive involved the surgical removal of the brain and internal organs and an embalming process that dehydrated the body over seventy days and culminated in priests pouring an expensive combination of resins inside the body to preserve it—all of which was related to the religious beliefs of the ancient Egyptians. Although the internal organs were separately mummified and stored in canopic jars, the heart remained in the body, which was wrapped in linen and placed in a coffin, finally ready for the funeral service.

      Portions of a recently rediscovered video of a 1958 Armstrong Circle Theater television program giving a fictionalized presentation relating to the Brooklyn Museum mummies will be a part of the installation. The program recounts an incident in the 1950s in which Museum officials, believing that mummies had no place in an art museum, attempted to get rid of some of the Brooklyn mummy holdings. Several staff members of the Brooklyn Museum have searched for a copy of the program over the past several decades, and it was only rediscovered in 2009.

      The exhibition was organized by Edward Bleiberg, Curator of Egyptian Art at the Brooklyn Museum. Dr. Bleiberg also organized the related touring exhibition To Live Forever: Art and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt, on view at the Brooklyn Museum February 12 through May 2, 2010, and is also working on an exhibition of animal mummies scheduled for 2012–2013. Another related exhibition, Body Parts: Ancient Egyptian Fragments and Amulets, organized by Associate Curator Ekaterina Barbash, is on view through October 2, 2011.

      The installation of The Mummy Chamber is being supported by the Leon Levy Foundation and the Museum’s Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund.

      Press Area of Website View Original

    Press Coverage of this Exhibition ?

    • Unwrapping the MummyMay 5, 2010 "Images from the “Mummy Chamber” exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum...."
    • Unwrapping the MummyMay 5, 2010 "Images from the “Mummy Chamber” exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum...."
    • Unwrapping the MummyMay 5, 2010 "Images from the “Mummy Chamber” exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum...."
    • Unwrapping the MummyMay 5, 2010 "Images from the “Mummy Chamber” exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum...."
    • Unwrapping the MummyMay 5, 2010 "Images from the “Mummy Chamber” exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum...."
    • Unwrapping the MummyMay 5, 2010 "Images from the “Mummy Chamber” exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum...."
    • Unwrapping the MummyMay 5, 2010 "Images from the “Mummy Chamber” exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum...."
    • Unwrapping the MummyMay 5, 2010 "Images from the “Mummy Chamber” exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum...."
    • Unwrapping the MummyMay 5, 2010 "Images from the “Mummy Chamber” exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum...."
    • Melvin the Mummy's New ClothesMay 9, 2010 By TED LOOS"WHEN it comes to names for Egyptian mummies, there's no question that Anonymous Man lacks the royal heft of, say, King Tutankhamun. Even the Anonymous Man's nickname, Melvin, isn't quite a head turner. Even so, as crowds swarm the mummy-less exhibition of treasures of the predictably famous King Tut at the Discovery Times Square Exposition, Melvin..."
    advanced 106,522 records currently online.

    Separate each tag with a space: painting portrait.

    Or join words together in one tag by using double quotes: "Brooklyn Museum."


      Recently Tagged Exhibitions

      Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /home/www/default/views/opencollection/_tags_list.php on line 15

      Recent Comments

      "Hi Aimee, I think you mean Oreet Ashery? More information can be found in her profile on the Feminist Art Base: http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/feminist_art_base/gallery/oreet_ashery.php?i=266"
      By shelley

      "Hi, I am trying to find the name of the artist who took and is in the photograph that follows- http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/exhibitions/664/Global_Feminisms_Remix/image/216/Global_Feminisms_Remix._%7C08032007_-_03032008%7C._Installation_view. I believe the artist takes pictures of herself dressed as a man but then exposes her femaleness, as in the photo of her dressed as an Ascetic Jew exposing her breast. Can you help me find her information? Thanks in advance- Aimee Record"
      By Aimee Record

      "For more information on Louis Schanker and the New York Art Scene of the mid 1900's go to http://www.LouisSchanker.info "
      By Lou Siegel

      Join the posse or log in to work with our collections. Your tags, comments and favorites will display with your attribution.


      The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
      For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the informative text panels written by the curator or organizer. Called "didactics," these panels are presented to the public during the exhibition's run, and we reproduce them here for your reference and archival interest. Please note that any illustrations on the original didactics have not been retained, and that the text may contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
      For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the objects from the Brooklyn Museum collection that were in the installation. These objects are listed here for your reference and archival interest, but the list may be incomplete and does not contain objects owned by other institutions or lenders.
      This section utilizes the New York Times API in order to display related materials in New York Times publications.