Exhibitions: Seductive Subversion: Women Pop Artists, 1958–1968

  • 1st Floor
    Arts of Africa, Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden
  • 2nd Floor
    Arts of Asia and the Islamic World
  • 3rd Floor
    Egyptian Art, European Paintings
  • 4th Floor
    Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art
  • 5th Floor
    Luce Center for American Art

On View: Relief of a High Official

As perhaps the most powerful official of his time in southern Egypt, Montuemhat had one of the largest and most lavishly decorated nonroyal ...

Hiroshige's One Hundred Famous Views of Edo

Hiroshige's 118 woodblock landscape and genre scenes of mid-nineteenth-century Tokyo, is one of the greatest achievements of Japanese art.

    On View: Pendant Cross

    Ethiopian Crosses
    Christianity most likely arrived in Ethiopia in the first century. The conversion of King Ezana in 330

     
    Want to add this object to a set? Please join the Posse, or log in.

    close

    DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_01_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_21_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_20_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_19_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_18_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_17_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_16_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_15_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_14_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_13_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_12_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_11_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_10_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_09_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_08_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_07_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_06.PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_05_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_04_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_03_PS4.jpg DIG_E2010_Seductive_Subversion_02_PS4.jpg

    Seductive Subversion: Women Pop Artists, 1958–1968

    Press Releases ?
    • May 31, 2010: The first major exhibition to explore in depth the contributions of female Pop artists, Seductive Subversion: Women Pop Artists, 1958–1968, seeks to expand the definition of classic Pop art and re-evaluate the role of the women who worked alongside the movement’s more famous male practitioners. It features more than fifty works by Pop art’s most significant female artists and includes many pieces that have not been shown in nearly forty years. The exhibition will be on view in the Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art and in the adjacent fourth-floor Schapiro Wing galleries.

      Although radical social changes were taking place in America in the 1960s, the female Pop artists of the time remained largely unacknowledged by the contemporary art critics and academics. Relegated to the margins of history by discrimination, historical precedent, and social expectations, these women were forced to take a back seat to their male counterparts, who became icons of the era. Informed by their personal histories, the work of female Pop artists was often collaborative and incorporated empathetic social commentary.

      Seductive Subversion includes Marisol’s John Wayne sculpture, commissioned by Life magazine for an issue on movies; the French sculptor, painter, and filmmaker Niki de Saint Phalle’s eight-foot-tall Black Rosy, one of her “Nana” sculptures exploring the role of women; Rosalyn Drexler’s oil and acrylic work Chubby Checker, inspired by the poster for the movie Twist around the Clock, and Home Movies, based on frames from old gangster movies; the Times Square–inspired Ampersand, a multilayered, stylized, and illuminated neon ampersand in a Plexiglas cube by Chryssa, one of the first artists to utilize neon in her work; and a seventeen-foot-long triptych by Idelle Weber. Artwork has been loaned by the National Gallery; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (Washington, D.C.); the Neuberger Museum (Purchase, New York); and major private collectors.

      Works from the Brooklyn Museum’s holdings have been added exclusively for the Brooklyn exhibition. They include Squeeze Me and You Can’t Catch Me by Mara McAfee; Dear Diana and My Love We Won’t by Niki de Saint Phalle; Nestle’s Box by Marjorie Strider; and Cents Sign Travelling from Broadway to Africa via Guadeloupe by Chryssa, which will be on display at the Museum for the first time. Paintings and sculptures by Evelyne Axell, Pauline Boty, Vija Celmins, Dorothy Grebenak, Kay Kurt, Yayoi Kusama, Lee Lozano, Mara McAfee, Barbro Ostlihn, Faith Ringgold, Martha Rosler, Marjorie Strider, Kiki Kogelnik, Marta Minujin, and May Wilson will also be featured.

      Seductive Subversion: Women Pop Artists, 1958–1968 was organized by the Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. The Brooklyn presentation is coordinated by Catherine Morris, Curator of the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue published by the University of the Arts Press and Abbeville Press.

      Press Area of Website View Original

    Press Coverage of this Exhibition ?

    • THE NEW SEASON | ART; Dalí, Richter and Houdini in Chains!September 12, 2010 By KAREN ROSENBERG"Dates and touring sites are subject to change. SEPTEMBER FISH FORMS: LAMPS BY FRANK GEHRY Eight lamps and other works by the 81-year-old starchitect reveal an interest in piscine imagery. Through Oct. 31 at the Jewish Museum, Manhattan; (212) 423-3200, jewishmuseum.org. GABRIEL KURI The museum mounts a 10-year survey of this Mexico City artist,..."
    • Movements Expanded And RedefinedSeptember 12, 2010 By ROBERTA SMITH"ONE thing about art objects: they never shut up. If they survive, they continue to broadcast; they transmit information and spawn experiences that we savor, puzzle over, interpret and judge. With time, real people and actual events fade, but works of art of all disciplines often live to see another day, make a different impression and appear in a..."
    • THE WEEK AHEAD | OCT. 10--OCT. 16October 10, 2010 "Art Ken Johnson The five most famous Pop artists are all men: Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, James Rosenquist, Tom Wesselmann and Claes Oldenburg. What about the women? ''Seductive Subversion: Women Pop Artists, 1958-1968,'' a potentially revelatory exhibition opening Friday at the Brooklyn Museum, presents more than 50 works by 25 female artists..."
    • ART REVIEW; Before the Rebellion, Playful Pop Art NoveltyOctober 15, 2010 By KEN JOHNSON"Why have there been no great female Pop artists? That's the question posed by Sid Sachs at the start of his catalog essay for ''Seductive Subversion: Women Pop Artists, 1958-1968,'' a revelatory time capsule of an exhibition that he has organized at the Brooklyn Museum. He is paraphrasing the title of Linda Nochlin's monument of feminist art..."
    • The ListingsOctober 22, 2010 "Art Museums and galleries are in Manhattan unless otherwise noted. Full reviews of recent art shows: nytimes.com/art. Museums - Asia Society Museum: 'Yoshitomo Nara: Nobody's Fool,' through Jan. 2. This Japanese artist, known for paintings and sculptures of big-eyed toddlers and friendly dogs redolent of children's books, makes over the entire..."
    • The ListingsOctober 29, 2010 "Art Museums and galleries are in Manhattan unless otherwise noted. Full reviews of recent art shows: nytimes.com/art. Museums - Asia Society Museum: 'Yoshitomo Nara: Nobody's Fool,' through Jan. 2. This Japanese artist, known for paintings and sculptures of big-eyed toddlers and friendly dogs redolent of children's books, makes over the entire..."
    • The ListingsNovember 5, 2010 "Art Museums and galleries are in Manhattan unless otherwise noted. Full reviews of recent art shows: nytimes.com/art. Museums - Asia Society Museum: 'Yoshitomo Nara: Nobody's Fool,' through Jan. 2. This Japanese artist, known for paintings and sculptures of big-eyed toddlers and friendly dogs redolent of children's books, makes over the entire..."
    • The ListingsNovember 12, 2010 "Art Museums and galleries are in Manhattan unless otherwise noted. Full reviews of recent art shows: nytimes.com/art. Museums American Folk Art Museum: 'Eugene Von Bruenchenhein: 'Freelance Artist -- Poet and Sculptor -- Inovator -- Arrow maker and Plant man -- Bone artifacts constructor -- Photographer and Architect -- Philosopher,' through Oct...."
    advanced 108,124 records currently online.

    Separate each tag with a space: painting portrait.

    Or join words together in one tag by using double quotes: "Brooklyn Museum."


    Recently Tagged Exhibitions

    Recent Comments

    "Hi Aimee, I think you mean Oreet Ashery? More information can be found in her profile on the Feminist Art Base: http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/feminist_art_base/gallery/oreet_ashery.php?i=266"
    By shelley

    "Hi, I am trying to find the name of the artist who took and is in the photograph that follows- http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/exhibitions/664/Global_Feminisms_Remix/image/216/Global_Feminisms_Remix._%7C08032007_-_03032008%7C._Installation_view. I believe the artist takes pictures of herself dressed as a man but then exposes her femaleness, as in the photo of her dressed as an Ascetic Jew exposing her breast. Can you help me find her information? Thanks in advance- Aimee Record"
    By Aimee Record

    "For more information on Louis Schanker and the New York Art Scene of the mid 1900's go to http://www.LouisSchanker.info "
    By Lou Siegel

    Join the posse or log in to work with our collections. Your tags, comments and favorites will display with your attribution.


    The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
    For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the informative text panels written by the curator or organizer. Called "didactics," these panels are presented to the public during the exhibition's run, and we reproduce them here for your reference and archival interest. Please note that any illustrations on the original didactics have not been retained, and that the text may contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
    For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the objects from the Brooklyn Museum collection that were in the installation. These objects are listed here for your reference and archival interest, but the list may be incomplete and does not contain objects owned by other institutions or lenders.
    This section utilizes the New York Times API in order to display related materials in New York Times publications.