Exhibitions: Raw/Cooked: Marela Zacarias

  • 1st Floor
    Arts of Africa, Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden
  • 2nd Floor
    Arts of Asia and the Islamic World
  • 3rd Floor
    Egyptian Art, European Paintings
  • 4th Floor
    Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art
  • 5th Floor
    Luce Center for American Art

On View: Le Havre, The Port (Le Havre, Le Port)

For Boudin, the sky—with its constant cloud motion and ever-changing light—proved a powerful source of inspiration throughout hi...

Hiroshige's One Hundred Famous Views of Edo

Hiroshige's 118 woodblock landscape and genre scenes of mid-nineteenth-century Tokyo, is one of the greatest achievements of Japanese art.

    On View: Pendant Cross with Crown and Star of David

    Ethiopian Crosses
    Christianity most likely arrived in Ethiopia in the first century. The conversion of King Ezana in 330

     

    Login to play

    Login with Google ID

    Forgot your password?

    Not a Posse member? Register

    Brooklyn Museum Posse:
    Exploring the collection

    When you join the posse, your tags comments and favorites will display with your attribution and save to your profile.

    Want to add this object to a set? Please join the Posse, or log in.

    close

    DIG_E_2013_Raw_Cooked_Marela_Zacarias_001_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2013_Raw_Cooked_Marela_Zacarias_002_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2013_Raw_Cooked_Marela_Zacarias_003_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2013_Raw_Cooked_Marela_Zacarias_004_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2013_Raw_Cooked_Marela_Zacarias_005_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2013_Raw_Cooked_Marela_Zacarias_006_PS4.jpg

    Raw/Cooked: Marela Zacarias

    Press Releases ?
    • November 1, 2012: An exhibition of four site-specific sculptures created by Brooklyn artist Marela Zacarias, inspired by the Williamsburg Murals on long-term loan to the Brooklyn Museum for more than twenty years, will be on view February 1 through April 28, 2013. Zacarias is the seventh artist in the continuing Raw/Cooked series of work by under-the-radar-Brooklyn artists, presented with support from Bloomberg.

      The artists in the series’ second season were recommended by an advisory panel of leading Brooklyn artists that includes Michael Joo, Paul Ramírez Jonas, Amy Sillman, and Mickalene Thomas, who each proposed three artists for consideration. The final selections were made by Eugenie Tsai, John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art at the Brooklyn Museum. The Museum offers each of the participating artists a variety of unconventional spaces in which they may make art interventions, creating projects that draw inspiration from the architecture of the building and/or works from the Museum’s collection.

      Zacarias, recommended by Ramírez Jonas, lives and works in the Gowanus neighborhood in Brooklyn. Her work combines painting and sculpture and is characterized by an interest in site specificity, the history contained in objects, and current events. Her Raw/Cooked exhibition, titled Supple Beat, draws on the concept of resilience in the Williamsburg Murals and explores the idea of bouncing back from adversity, relating to the history of the public housing project for which the Murals were commissioned. Zacarias’s large-scale wall sculptures are constructed from window screens and joint compound and painted with original patterns that the artist will design based on the unique color palettes and geometric abstract forms of the Murals. Positioned on the walls of the first-floor lobby and the Great Hall, the works in Supple Beat suggest movement and appear to be unfurling—climbing walls and interacting with objects as if they were murals that have come to life, escaping their confinement.

      A longtime resident of Brooklyn, Zacarias was born in Mexico City. In 2012 she was the first artist-in-residence at the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of Connecticut. She is a graduate of Kenyon College and received an MFA in painting from Hunter College. She has taught mural art in Washington, D.C., and Mexico City and is the cofounder of the Connecticut-based Latinos Contra La Guerra and the Regional Coalition for Immigrants Rights.

      The Williamsburg Murals, which were recently reinstalled in the Museum’s newly renovated Café, near the Zacarias installation, were executed by the pioneering American abstractionists Ilya Bolotowsky, Balcomb Greene, Paul Kelpe, and Albert Swinden. Commissioned in 1936 by the Works Progress Administration/Federal Art Project for the basement community rooms of Brooklyn’s Williamsburg Houses, these murals were the first nonobjective public murals in the United States, containing no recognizable figures, symbols, or objects. Over the years they suffered significant neglect, all but forgotten until they were rediscovered in the 1980s under layers of paint that were painstakingly removed. They have been on long-term loan to the Brooklyn Museum from the New York City Housing Authority since 1990.

      Each of the four Zacarias sculptures will relate to the location of one of the Williamsburg Houses: 163–213 Manhattan, 122–192 Bushwick, 202–254 Graham, and 215–274 Humboldt.

      Two additional exhibitions in the Raw/Cooked series will take place later in 2013. Williamsburg artist Michael Ballou will be the eighth Raw/Cooked artist, with an exhibition opening on April 12th, and another artist will be selected to exhibit in June 2013. Raw/Cooked continues the Brooklyn Museum’s long tradition of collecting and presenting work by both emerging and established Brooklyn artists. Over the past decade the Museum has presented several exhibitions focused on the borough’s artists, among them Open House, featuring the work of 200 artists, as well as solo exhibitions of work by Fred Tomaselli, Lorna Simpson, and Mickalene Thomas, and GO: a community-curated open studio project, on view December 1 through February 24, 2013.

      Press Area of Website View Original

    advanced 105,904 records currently online.

    Separate each tag with a space: painting portrait.

    Or join words together in one tag by using double quotes: "Brooklyn Museum."


      Recently Tagged Exhibitions

      Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /home/www/default/views/opencollection/_tags_list.php on line 15

      Recent Comments

      "Hi Aimee, I think you mean Oreet Ashery? More information can be found in her profile on the Feminist Art Base: http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/feminist_art_base/gallery/oreet_ashery.php?i=266"
      By shelley

      "Hi, I am trying to find the name of the artist who took and is in the photograph that follows- http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/exhibitions/664/Global_Feminisms_Remix/image/216/Global_Feminisms_Remix._%7C08032007_-_03032008%7C._Installation_view. I believe the artist takes pictures of herself dressed as a man but then exposes her femaleness, as in the photo of her dressed as an Ascetic Jew exposing her breast. Can you help me find her information? Thanks in advance- Aimee Record"
      By Aimee Record

      "For more information on Louis Schanker and the New York Art Scene of the mid 1900's go to http://www.LouisSchanker.info "
      By Lou Siegel

      Join the posse or log in to work with our collections. Your tags, comments and favorites will display with your attribution.


      The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
      For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the informative text panels written by the curator or organizer. Called "didactics," these panels are presented to the public during the exhibition's run, and we reproduce them here for your reference and archival interest. Please note that any illustrations on the original didactics have not been retained, and that the text may contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
      For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the objects from the Brooklyn Museum collection that were in the installation. These objects are listed here for your reference and archival interest, but the list may be incomplete and does not contain objects owned by other institutions or lenders.
      This section utilizes the New York Times API in order to display related materials in New York Times publications.