Exhibitions: Valerie Hegarty: Alternative Histories

  • 1st Floor
    Arts of Africa, Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden
  • 2nd Floor
    Arts of Asia and the Islamic World
  • 3rd Floor
    Egyptian Art, European Paintings
  • 4th Floor
    Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art
  • 5th Floor
    Luce Center for American Art

Hiroshige's One Hundred Famous Views of Edo

Hiroshige's 118 woodblock landscape and genre scenes of mid-nineteenth-century Tokyo, is one of the greatest achievements of Japanese art.

    On View: Marble Head of Serapis

    Serapis was a composite god deliberately created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite the Greeks and the Egyptians. The dei...

     
    Want to add this object to a set? Please join the Posse, or log in.

    close

    DIG_E_2013_Valerie_Hegarty_Alternative_Histories_Cane_Acres_Plantation_view1_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2013_Valerie_Hegarty_Alternative_Histories_Cane_Acres_Plantation_view2_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2013_Valerie_Hegarty_Alternative_Histories_Cupola_House_hall_view1_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2013_Valerie_Hegarty_Alternative_Histories_Cupola_House_hall_view2_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2013_Valerie_Hegarty_Alternative_Histories_Cupola_House_hall_view3_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2013_Valerie_Hegarty_Alternative_Histories_Cupola_House_parlor_view1_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2013_Valerie_Hegarty_Alternative_Histories_Cupola_House_parlor_view2_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2013_Valerie_Hegarty_Alternative_Histories_Cupola_House_parlor_view3_PS4.jpg DIG_E_2013_Valerie_Hegarty_Alternative_Histories_Cupola_House_parlor_view4_PS4.jpg

    Valerie Hegarty: Alternative Histories

    Exhibition Didactics ?
    • Valerie Hegarty: Alternative Histories Three special projects in the Brooklyn Museum period rooms [i]
      Alternative Histories, by Brooklyn artist Valerie Hegarty, is the second in a series of “activations,” or installations, in which artists are invited to place site-specific works in the Museum’s period rooms in order to forge new connections between the past and the present. Hegarty’s artworks, on display here, in the parlor and hall of the Cupola House, and around the corner, in the Cane Acres Plantation dining room, address aspects of American history that she feels are missing from the rooms as they are usually installed.

      In the Cupola House parlor, Hegarty has inserted two unusual portraits and a rug alluding to the displacement of Native Americans during the European colonization of North America. Her portrait of George Washington, based on a painting by Rembrandt Peale (1778–1860), could be seen as her response to what she calls Washington’s attempt to “intimidate and subdue the Indians,” while the second portrait, based on a painting of the Pawnee Chief Sharitarish by Charles Bird King (1785–1862), suggests Native Americans’ resistance and resilience. The rug recalls nineteenth-century American blankets that reflect stereotypical Native American patterns, many created by the Pendleton Woolen Mills, which sent its artisans to live with Native Americans.

      In the Cupola House hall, Hegarty has replaced some of the furniture and dishes with her own, while adding her version of The Pic-Nic (1846) by Thomas Cole (1801–1848). All of these objects are riddled with holes. Who or what is responsible for the holes? The two woodpeckers perhaps? Or the violence associated with colonization and war alluded to in the parlor?

      You can see another example of Hegarty’s longstanding interest in examining American history in her painting Fallen Bierstadt (2007), on display in American Identities on the fifth floor.

    • Valerie Hegarty: Alternative Histories Three special projects in the Brooklyn Museum period rooms [ii]
      Alternative Histories, by Brooklyn artist Valerie Hegarty, is the second in a series of “activations,” or installations, in which artists are invited to place site-specific works in the Museum’s period rooms in order to forge new connections between the past and the present. Hegarty’s artworks, on display here, in the Cane Acres Plantation dining room, and around the corner, in the parlor and hall of the Cupola House, address aspects of American history that she feels are missing from the rooms as they are usually installed.

      Here Hegarty has added two still-life “paintings”—actually trompe l’oeil sculptures—that appear to have come to life, spilling fruit onto the lace-covered dining room table, where it provides a feast for a flock of crows. These works, which resemble vanitas paintings, allude to mortality and introduce a suggestion of passing time to a room that might otherwise appear frozen in a particular moment. They also add an element of disquiet and violence that belies the room’s elegant appearance, suggesting the system of enslaved labor and oppression behind plantation society.

      You can see another example of Hegarty’s longstanding interest in examining American history in her painting Fallen Bierstadt (2007), on display in American Identities on the fifth floor.

    advanced 106,538 records currently online.

    Separate each tag with a space: painting portrait.

    Or join words together in one tag by using double quotes: "Brooklyn Museum."


    Recently Tagged Exhibitions

    Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /home/www/default/views/opencollection/_tags_list.php on line 15

    Recent Comments

    "Hi Aimee, I think you mean Oreet Ashery? More information can be found in her profile on the Feminist Art Base: http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/feminist_art_base/gallery/oreet_ashery.php?i=266"
    By shelley

    "Hi, I am trying to find the name of the artist who took and is in the photograph that follows- http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/exhibitions/664/Global_Feminisms_Remix/image/216/Global_Feminisms_Remix._%7C08032007_-_03032008%7C._Installation_view. I believe the artist takes pictures of herself dressed as a man but then exposes her femaleness, as in the photo of her dressed as an Ascetic Jew exposing her breast. Can you help me find her information? Thanks in advance- Aimee Record"
    By Aimee Record

    "For more information on Louis Schanker and the New York Art Scene of the mid 1900's go to http://www.LouisSchanker.info "
    By Lou Siegel

    Join the posse or log in to work with our collections. Your tags, comments and favorites will display with your attribution.


    The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
    For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the informative text panels written by the curator or organizer. Called "didactics," these panels are presented to the public during the exhibition's run, and we reproduce them here for your reference and archival interest. Please note that any illustrations on the original didactics have not been retained, and that the text may contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
    For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the objects from the Brooklyn Museum collection that were in the installation. These objects are listed here for your reference and archival interest, but the list may be incomplete and does not contain objects owned by other institutions or lenders.
    This section utilizes the New York Times API in order to display related materials in New York Times publications.