Exhibitions: American Identities: A New Look

  • 1st Floor
    Arts of Africa, Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden
  • 2nd Floor
    Arts of Asia and the Islamic World
  • 3rd Floor
    Egyptian Art, European Paintings
  • 4th Floor
    Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art
  • 5th Floor
    Luce Center for American Art

On View: Tankard

A tankard made out of valuable material was part of its owner's capital. In the eighteenth century, a tankard might cost more than the annua...

Hiroshige's One Hundred Famous Views of Edo

Hiroshige's 118 woodblock landscape and genre scenes of mid-nineteenth-century Tokyo, is one of the greatest achievements of Japanese art.

    On View: Funerary Mask

    On the South Coast of Peru a mythological figure began appearing on ceramics and textiles about 200 to 100  

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    American Identities: A New Look

    • Dates: On view since September 12, 2001
    • Collections: American Art , Contemporary Art , Decorative Arts
    • Location: On view in Luce Center for American Art, 5th Floor
    • Description: American Identities: A New Look (long-term installation) [09/12/2001 - --/--/2---]. Installation view.
    • Citation: Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Painting and Sculpture. (P&S_E_2001_American)
    • Source: color slide 1 x 1.5 in. (3 x 4 cm)
    • Related Links: Main Exhibition Page
    Press Releases ?
    • May 2001: To expand and enhance the visitor’s experience of American art, the Brooklyn Museum of Art has undertaken a major reinstallation of its American art holdings, considered one of the great collections of its kind in the world. The new presentation will integrate, for the first time, important objects from the Museum’s exceptional collections of paintings and sculpture, decorative arts, Spanish colonial art, and Native American material. American Identities: A Reinterpretation of American Art at the BMA, which will go on long-term view on September 7, is the first phase in creating the Luce Center for American Art. It will be followed in 2002 with a new public study center adjacent to the existing galleries that will make available to the public an additional 3,000 objects.

      American Identities will be installed in 12,000 square feet of gallery space on the fifth floor of the Museum’s East Wing [and] will include nearly two hundred paintings, sculptures, and works on paper ranging from colonial portraits to distinguished works by artists such as John Singleton Copley, Thomas Cole, Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Eakins, Childe Hassam, and John Singer Sargent, to twentieth-century paintings by Stuart Davis, Ad Reinhardt, Richard Diebenkorn, Barbara Kruger, and others. These works will be complemented by more than 125 related holdings representing the depth and quality of the Museum’s Decorative Arts collections, among them furniture, ceramics, silver, Tiffany objects, textiles, Spanish colonial material, and Native American objects.

      The installation of American Identities: A Reinterpretation of American Art at the BMA will be thematic and intended to present the concerns of daily life as expressed and reflected in works of art. It will also include contemporaneous photographs; and four film and video stations throughout the galleries, where short period films related to the themes will play on a continuous loop. Text panels will explore each of the themes and for the first time, descriptive labels will accompany many of the individual works, as well as statements from “new voices” such as artists and members of the Museum’s community, and commentary from period literature. Highlights from the collection will also be included in an audio tour of the entire permanent collection that is planned for the near future.

      The new presentation will begin with an Orientation Section that will include Asher B. Durand’s The First Harvest in the Wilderness; Francis Guy’s Winter Scene in Brooklyn, which illustrates Brooklyn’s racial diversity in the early 19th century and was one of the first works to enter the collection; Georgia O’Keeffe’s rendering of the Brooklyn Bridge; and a basket made by the last living Brooklyn Canarsie Indian.

      From Colony to Nation will explore the transformation of colonial societies into an emerging nation in search of a symbolic and stylistic identity. Works on view will include portraits by painters such John Singleton Copley, Gilbert Stuart, and Charles Willson Peale, along with objects including an 18th-century silver tankard made in New York; a pair of early 19th-century Sevres vases adorned with portraits of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, and a door and doorframe from a Brooklyn house, as well as Spanish colonial material.

      Inventing American Landscape will deal with the development of the American tradition of landscape painting in the 19th century and its continuing role in expressing the national identity. Among the works in this section will be Albert Bierstadt’s monumental A Storm in the Rocky Mountains-Mount Rosalie and Thomas Cole’s A View of the Two Lakes Mountain House, Catskill Mountains Morning, along with such 20th-century works as Arthur B. Dove’s Flat Surfaces; Richard Diebenkorn’s non-objective Ocean Park No. 27; and Pat Steir’s Everlasting Waterfall.

      Home Life, which will explore how Americans have defined their daily customs from the early Republic to the present, will include works such as George Caleb Bingham’s genre frontier landscape Shooting for the Beef; Eastman Johnson’s urban interior Not At Home; Larry Rivers’s July; and Florine Stettheimer’s evocation of ennui, Heat; a Herter Brothers Mantel from the Sloan Griswold House that has not been on view for a quarter century; along with 19th- and 20th[-]century still-life paintings; household objects and furniture; and works by women of the Arts and Crafts movement.

      The visual culture of the Civil War is examined in A Nation Divided. Included will be Alexander Pope’s Emblems of the Civil War; Eastman Johnson’s Ride for Liberty; Hiram Powers’s master work in the history of American Neoclassical 1869 sculpture, The Greek Slave, which came to be interpreted as an expression of anti-slavery sentiments; and related contemporary works such as Melvyn Edwards’s Lynch Fragment.

      Post Civil War expansion of American worldliness and the fascination with the exotic are dealt with in the section Crossing Borders. The new and energetic eclecticism in artistic styles and subjects will be represented by works such as Frederic Church’s Tropical Scenery; William Merritt Chase’s The Moorish Warrior; and Edwin Lord Weeks’s The Old Blue-Tiled Mosque Outside of Delhi, India; as well as by objects such as a chest of drawers in the Japanese style made of woven cane, bamboo, and brass, which was sold on Fulton Street in Brooklyn.

      Art Making is an examination of the artistic process from folk art to academic figure styles and will include material as diverse as Edward Hicks’s The Peaceable Kingdom; the African American folk art sculptor William Edmondson’s Angel; Louise Bourgeois’s Decontractée; Gaston Lachaise’s monumental Standing Woman; Alex Katz’s Ann; the folk art Giraffe Head; a Kwakiutl male potlatch figure; and a side chair decorated with gold stenciled swans.

      The Centennial Era, examining visual culture from the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia through the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, will include George Inness’s Sunrise; Winslow Homer’s In the Mountains; Augustus Saint-Gaudens’s Amor Caritas; Cheyenne ledger book drawings; the Union Porcelain Works masterpiece, Century Vase, which was exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition and depicts icons such as bison heads and the American eagle; as well as Native American ceramics, clothing, and basketry.

      Modern Life will focus on the transformation of American life and landscape through technology, urbanization, and successive waves of immigration. This evolution was manifested in representations of industry and cities, the introduction of a machine aesthetic, and new artistic methods and styles. Among the works in this section will be new interpretations of natural forces such as Adolph Gottlieb’s Premonition of Evil; Stuart Davis’s abstract master piece The Mellow Pad, which captures the movement of the jazz music he loved; Barbara Kruger’s Untitled (We Are Notifying You of a Change of Address); and objects such as Norman Bel Geddes’ Skyscraper Cocktail Set; a 1930s RCA Victor portable phonograph; and a Frank Lloyd Wright side chair.

      This project will be organized by a team of BMA curators: Teresa A. Carbone (Project Director), Dr. Linda S. Ferber, Andrew W. Mellon Curator of American Art and Chair of the department of American Art; Dr. Barbara Dayer Gallati, Curator of American Painting and Sculpture; Dr. Barry Harwood, Curator of Decorative Arts; Charlotta Kotik, Curator of Contemporary Art; and Susan Kennedy Zeller, Assistant Curator of Arts of the Americas. Vice Director of Education Dr. Joel Hoffman will play a major role in the project. Matthew Yokobosky will design the reinstallation.

      American Identities: A Reinterpretation of American Art at the BMA is supported by a generous grant from the Independence Community Foundation for the Museum’s project American Identities: Building Audiences for the Future. American Identities: A Reinterpretation of American Art at the BMA is the first phase in creating the Luce Center for American Art.

      The Brooklyn Museum of Art is recognized as a leader in the acquisition, study, and exhibition of American art with a collection distinguished by its breadth, quality, and size comprising some 2,500 oil paintings, sculptures, watercolors, and pastels that range in date from 1720 to the late 20th century. Its exceptional holdings of decorative arts are considered among the finest in the United States. Its important collection of Native American material is one of only two on view in New York City.

      View Original

    • June 2001: Continuing Exhibitions

      Arts of Africa
      Long-Term Installation

      Leon Golub: Paintings, 1950–2000
      Through August 19, 2001

      Digital: Printmaking Now
      June 22-September 2, 2001

      Upcoming Exhibitions

      My Reality: Contemporary Art and the Culture of Japanese Animation
      July 28-October 7, 2001

      American Identities: A Reinterpretation of American Art at the BMA
      Opens September 5, 2001 (Long-Term Installation)

      Wit and Wine: A New Look at Ancient Iranian Ceramics from the Arthur M. Sackler Foundation
      September 7-December 30, 2001

      Vital Forms: American Art and Design in the Atomic Age, 1940–1960
      October 12, 2001-January 6, 2002

      Eternal Egypt: Masterworks of Ancient Art from The British Museum
      November 23, 2001-February 24, 2002

      Star Wars: The Magic of Myth
      April 5-July, 7 2002

      Exposed: The Victorian Nude
      September 2, 2002-January 5, 2003

      The Last Expression: Art from Auschwitz
      February 28-May 11, 2003

      Great Expectations: John Singer Sargent Painting Children
      September 19-November 30, 2003


      Continuing Exhibitions

      Arts of Africa
      Long-Term Installation
      (African Galleries, 1st floor)
      More than twenty important objects, previously not on view, will be integrated into a major reinstallation of some 225 works from the Museum's exceptional holdings of African art. Although a wide selection from the hundreds of African cultures will be represented, the reinstallation is exceptionally strong in works from Central Africa, particularly those from the Kongo, Luba, and Kuba peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The majority of the items on display were created for religious or political ceremonial life, but the presentation will also include furniture, textiles, architectural fragments, household items, and objects of personal adornment.
      Organization: The reinstallation has been organized by William C. Siegmann, Chair of the Department of the Arts of Africa and the Pacific Islands at the Brooklyn Museum of Art.

      Leon Golub: Paintings, 1950-2000
      Through August 19, 2001
      (European Painting and Sculpture Galleries, 5th floor)
      This exhibition examines the career of Leon Golub (b. 1922), dean of American political art, whose intense, gritty paintings examine the complexities of power. The artist's raw and expressive canvases span the second half of the twentieth century and explore issues of race, violence, war, and the human condition. The exhibition of some fifty-five works, many of which are mural-sized, includes such monumental paintings as Gigantomachy Il (1966), Vietnam II (1973), and the BMA's own Riot IV (1983). A selection of Golub's lesser-known political portraits and his recent paintings that consider mortality will also be included.
      Organization: Leon Golub: Paintings, 1950-2000 was curated by Jon Bird, an independent, London-based curator, and organized by the Irish Museum of Modern Art in Dublin. Brooke Kamin Rapaport, Associate Curator in the Department of Contemporary Art, organized the presentation at the BMA.
      Support: The BMA presentation is supported, in part, by the BMA's Barbara and Richard Debs Exhibition Fund. Additional support is provided by The Broad Art Foundation and Dr. and Mrs. Philip J. Kozinn. Educational activities are made possible by the Third Millennium Foundation.
      Publication: Leon Golub: Echoes of the Real, with an essay by Jon Bird, includes more than 130 color plates and is published by Reaktion Books, Ltd., London.

      Digital: Printmaking Now
      June 22-September 2, 2001
      (Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing, 4th floor)
      This installment of the Print National, a survey of important developments in the field of printmaking, will focus on the increasing use of computers in the printmaking process. The exhibition, one of the first to address this issue, will include traditionally printed works that have been manipulated digitally and works created entirely by computer.
      Organization: This exhibition was organized by Marilyn Kushner, Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Support: Digital: Printmaking Now is organized by the Brooklyn Museum of Art. The exhibition is made possible, in part, by the Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc., and the BMA's Prints and Photographs Council. Additional support is provided by Marc A. Schwartz, Seymour and Laura Schweber, and Philip and Alma Kalb, and The Fund—created by a gift from the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation. Educational activities are supported by the Third Millennium Foundation. Media sponsors are Artbyte Magazine and Art on Paper.
      Publication: A fully-illustrated color catalogue will be available.


      Upcoming Exhibitions

      My Reality: Contemporary Art and the Culture of Japanese Animation
      July 28-October 7, 2001
      Synergies between Japanese and American popular culture are explored in this showcase of photography, painting, sculpture, and video that investigates the influence of Japanese animation (anime) and techno-culture on art. Anime is incredibly versatile in its ability to comment on social and sexual mores, gender roles, and traditional values in the face of an increasingly alien future. The exhibition features work by Takashi Murakami, Mariko Mori, Paul McCarthy, and Charlie White, among others.
      Organization: My Reality: Contemporary Art and the Culture of Japanese Animation was originally curated by Jeff Fleming, Senior Curator, and Susan Lubowsky Talbott, Director of the Des Moines Art Center. The exhibition is coordinated at the Brooklyn Museum of Art by Charlotta Kotik, Department Chair of Contemporary Art.
      Support: Educational activities for the BMA's presentation are supported by the Third Millennium Foundation. Additional support provided by The Fund—created by a gift from the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation.
      Publication: An illustrated catalogue co-published by the Des Moines Art Center and Independent Curators International accompanies My Reality.

      American Identities: A Reinterpretation of American Art at the BMA
      September 5, 2001-Long Term
      (Luce Center for American Art, 5th floor)
      This reinstallation of approximately 350 works from the permanent collections will present an innovative thematic survey of American paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts from the early eighteenth century to the present. An orientation gallery will introduce the visitor to the scope of the collections, showcasing a number of icons in a Brooklyn context. The galleries will be organized in a general chronological fashion with richly interpreted installations devoted to such themes as Dutch New Yorkers, Shaping American Landscapes, The Civil War Era, Women's Worlds, Urban Experiences, and The Drive toward Abstraction.
      Organization: This project is a collaboration among curators of American Paintings and Sculpture: Teresa A. Carbone, Project Director; Linda S. Ferber and Barbara Dayer Gallati; Decorative Arts: Kevin L. Stayton, Chair of Department of Decorative Arts, Barry R. Harwood; Contemporary Art: Charlotta Kotik; Arts of Americas: Susan Kennedy Zeller
      Support: American Identities: A Reinterpretation of American Art at the BMA is supported by a generous grant from the Independence Community Foundation for the Museum's project American Identities: Building Audiences for the Future, and by the National Endowment for the Arts.

      Wit and Wine: A New Look at Ancient Iranian Ceramics from the Arthur M. Sackler Foundation
      September 7-December 30, 2001
      (Robert E. Blum Gallery, 1st floor)
      This exhibition comprises forty-five pottery vessels—most for holding or pouring wine—from ancient Iran, ranging in date from the fifth millennium B.C. to the third century A.D. Demonstrating the extraordinary range of Iranian pottery, the exhibition includes such whimsical examples as a juglike vessel in the shape of human feet, and sculptural works in the shape of camels and bulls. Some containers clearly imitate early metal prototypes, with their unusually thin walls and long spouts, while others are painted with sophisticated ornamental designs depicting the animals of the Iranian highland. The Brooklyn Museum of Art is the last scheduled venue for this traveling exhibition.
      Organization: The exhibition has been organized by the Arthur M. Sackler Foundation and curated by Dr. Trudy S. Kawami. James F. Romano, Curator of Egyptian, Classical, and Ancient Middle Eastern Art at the BMA, will organize the presentation at the Brooklyn Museum of Art.

      Vital Forms: American Art and Design in the Atomic Age, 1940-1960
      October 5, 2001-January 6, 2002
      (Grand Lobby, 1st floor; Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing, 4th floor)
      This interdisciplinary exhibition will present 250 of the most innovative works of the 1940s and 1950s that embraced a vocabulary of organic, or vital, forms. Through architecture, decorative and industrial arts, graphic design, painting, photography, and sculpture, Vital Forms will examine the use of nature-based imagery during the postwar era. The exhibition will show how this aesthetic development represented an affirmation of life in the face of the Cold War and at the dawn of the nuclear age. Exploring the organic visual language adopted by some of the era's most progressive creators, the exhibition will include works of art and design such as paintings by Willem de Kooning and Mark Rothko, the "Predicta" television set, images of Eero Saarinen's TWA Terminal at JFK International Airport, Tupperware, the "Slinky," and the Ford Thunderbird. Additionally, the exhibition will trace how that visual vocabulary was applied to objects of popular culture, such as Formica countertop laminate and paperback book covers. The exhibition is the third in a series organized by the BMA that began with The American Renaissance, 1876-1917 (1979) and continued with The Machine Age in America, 1918-1941 (1986).
      Organization: This exhibition will be organized by Brooke Kamin Rapaport, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, and Kevin Stayton, Department Head and Curator of Decorative Arts at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Martin Filler and Mildred Friedman are consulting co-curators, and Dr. Paul Boyer is the project's cultural historian.
      Publication: A full-color catalogue published by the Brooklyn Museum of Art and Harry N. Abrams, Inc., will accompany the exhibition.
      Tour:
      Brooklyn Museum
      of Art:
      October 12, 2001-January 6, 2002

      Walker Art Center:
      February 16-May 12, 2002

      Frist Center for the Visual Arts:
      June 21-September 15, 2002

      Los Angeles County Museum of Art:
      November 17, 2002-February 23, 2003

      Phoenix Art Museum:
      April 4-June 29, 2003

      Support: Vital Forms: American Art and Design in the Atomic Age, 1940-1960 was organized by the Brooklyn Museum of Art. The exhibition was made possible, in part, by generous grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts. Additional support was provided by the Mary Jean and Frank P. Smeal Foundation, The Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation, and the Gramercy Park Foundation. Support for the catalogue was provided through the generosity of Furthermore, the Publication Program of the J.M. Kaplan Fund, as well as a BMA publications endowment created by the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

      Eternal Egypt: Masterworks of Ancient Art from The British Museum
      November 23, 2001-February 24, 2002
      (Beatrice and Samuel A. Seaver Gallery, 5th floor)
      This exhibition will provide a unique opportunity to view more than 140 ancient Egyptian masterpieces from The British Museum in London, many of which have never before traveled to the United States. Many large-scale works will be presented, including the capital of a temple column with a monumental carving of the goddess Hathor, as well as a world-famous portrait statue of the great pharaoh Sesostris III, royal jewelry, and paintings on papyrus illustrating scenes from The Book of the Dead. The exhibition will span the entire pharaonic period, from Dynasty I (about 3100 B.C.) to the period of Roman rule (4th century A.D.).
      Organization: This exhibition was organized by the American Federation of Arts and the British Museum, with guest curator Edna R. Russmann, Curator of Egyptian, Classical, and Ancient Middle Eastern Art at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, and W. V. Davies, the British Museum's Keeper of Egyptian Antiquities.
      Support: This exhibition and its national tour are made possible by Ford Motor Company. The official hotel of the Brooklyn leg of exhibition is the New York Marriott Brooklyn. Promotional support for the BMA's presentation is provided by Bloomingdale's. Additional support has been provided by the Benefactors Circle of the AFA.
      Publication: A fully illustrated catalogue accompanies this exhibition.

      Star Wars: The Magic of Myth
      April 5-July 7, 2002
      (Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing, 4th & 5th floors)
      The exhibition showcases original artwork, props, models, costumes, and characters used to create the original Star Wars trilogy—Star Wars: A New Hope, The Empire Strikes Back, and Return of the Jedi—as well as Episode I: The Phantom Menace. Included will be over 30 mannequins, 35 models, and 50 pieces of framed artworks. Among them will be R2-D2, C-3P0, Darth Vader, Yoda, Boba Fett, and Yoda as well as Princess Leia's Slave Girl Costume, Han Solo frozen in carbonite, the Millennium Falcon, and one of Queen Amidala's royal gowns. Interpretive panels throughout the exhibition trace the mythological and literary sources that transform Star Wars into a timeless epic. Drawing upon the work of Joseph Campbell in his book The Hero with a Thousand Faces, the exhibition shows how the themes of the young hero, the faithful companions, the endangered maiden, the wise guide, and others resonate through the Star Wars saga and give it an enduring universality. The exhibition will include a 26-minute documentary film, which will play continuously, on the making of the Star Wars saga.
      Organization:
      Star Wars: The Magic of Myth was developed by the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum. The exhibition was organized for travel by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES). All artifacts in this exhibition are on loan from the archives of Lucasfilm Ltd. The Brooklyn Museum of Art will be the final stop of a national tour. Catalogue: An illustrated catalogue accompanies the exhibition, entitled Star Wars: The Magic of Myth, by Mary Henderson, exhibition curator from the National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution.

      Exposed: The Victorian Nude
      September 2, 2002-January 5, 2003
      (Schapiro Galleries, 4th floor)
      The nude figure was one of the most controversial subjects in Victorian England. It fired the Victorian imagination as the central focus of arguments about aesthetics, morality, sexuality, and desire—issues that continue to provoke debate. Exposed: The Victorian Nude is the first exhibition to survey the full range of representations of the nude in Victorian art. While the exhibition concentrates mainly on the "high arts" of painting and sculpture, photography, popular illustrations, advertising, and caricature are included to demonstrate the prevalence of the nude in Victorian visual culture and the meaning it held.
      Organization: Exposed: The Victorian Nude has been organized by Tate Britain. Barbara Dayer Gallati, Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture, will coordinate the presentation at the Brooklyn Museum of Art.
      Publication: A fully illustrated catalogue will be available.
      Tour: The Brooklyn Museum of Art will be the only North American stop of this exhibition tour.

      The Adventures of Hamza
      November 1, 2002-January 26, 2003
      (Blum Gallery, 1st floor)
      The Adventures of Hamza (or Hamzanama) is a fantastic adventure story about the exploits of Hamza, uncle of the Prophet Muhammad, who traveled throughout the world spreading the doctrines of Islam. The narrative tells of encounters with giants, demons, and dragons; of abductions and hair - raising chases; and of believers, as well as those who resisted Islam. A favorite story for illustration, it was also recited in coffeehouses from Iran to northern India. The greatest illustrated manuscript of the Hamzanama was made in India for the Mughal Emperor Akbar (reigned 1556-1605) when he was still a teenager. It originally contained 1,400 enormous illustrations, about a tenth of which have survived today. This exhibition brings together some 70 of these illustrations from collections all over the world, and places them alongside new translations of the related text passages. Organization: The Adventures of Hamza has been curated by Dr. John W. Seyller and organized by the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, at the Smithsonian Institution. Amy G. Poster, Chair of the Asian Art Department at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, will coordinate the exhibition at the BMA.
      Publication: A fully illustrated catalogue will accompany this exhibition.

      Great Expectations: John Singer Sargent Painting Children
      September 19-November 30, 2003
      (Schapiro Galleries, 4th floor)
      John Singer Sargent is best known for his portraits of society women. This exhibition will assemble some forty depictions of children by Sargent to present an unexpected and revealing examination of his art. Rather than presenting children in the saccharine, sentimentalized fashion of the day, Sargent often captured them in moments of sober contemplation. Portraying his young subjects as psychologically complex individuals, Sargent redefined children's portraiture, which typically treated childhood as a generic age of innocence.
      Organization: This exhibition will be organized by Barbara Dayer Gallati, Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture, at the Brooklyn Museum of Art.
      Publication: A fully illustrated color catalogue will accompany this exhibition.

      The Last Expression: Art from Auschwitz
      February 29-May 11, 2003
      The Last Expression: Art from Auschwitz will feature two- and three-dimensional art produced by interned victims of Auschwitz and other camps. Artwork served different functions in the camps—catharsis, documentation, resistance, decoration, and official commissions. This exhibition will present the role of visual arts in concentration camps. The works of Jewish inmates, as well as that of resistance fighters from throughout Europe, will be included in this show.
      Organization: The Last Expression: Art from Auschwitz will be organized by the Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art at Northwestern University. Marilyn Kushner, Curator of Prints and Drawings, will be managing the project at the Brooklyn Museum of Art.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1995 - 2003. 2001, 070-077 View Original 1 . View Original 2 . View Original 3 . View Original 4 . View Original 5 . View Original 6 . View Original 7 . View Original 8

    Press Coverage of this Exhibition ?

    • FootlightsSeptember 12, 2001 By LAWRENCE VAN GELDERStory of Salvador Tavora heroine Carmen de Triana will be retold at City Center by more than 35 singers, flamenco artists, musicians and dancing white stallion; photo; major reinstallation of American art is mounted at Brooklyn Museum of Art, with exhibition at new Luce Center for American Art; photo; Ian Marshall Fisher's Lost Musicals series of concert performances of neglected works from 1930's to 60's will present Let's Face It, at New-York Historical Society; New Jersey Symphony Orchestra is about to open 79th season (M)
    • Reopenings TodaySeptember 13, 2001 "Broadway theaters are to reopen today, as is the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Many museums and cultural institutions are resuming their normal schedules and operations today and tomorrow. At the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the exhibition ''American Identities: A New Look'' will open today as scheduled. But some concerts and other cultural events,..."
    • Reopenings and PostponementsSeptember 13, 2001 New York City theaters, museums and concert halls are reopening in wake of terrorist attacks; some cultural events are postponed or canceled (M)
    • ART REVIEW; In History's Comforting SweepSeptember 21, 2001 By ROBERTA SMITHRoberta Smith reviews reinstallation of Brooklyn Museum's American collection; photos (M)
    • ART GUIDESeptember 28, 2001 "A selective listing by critics of The Times of new or noteworthy art, design and photography exhibitions at New York museums and art galleries this weekend. Addresses, unless otherwise noted, are in Manhattan. Most galleries are closed on Sundays and Mondays, but hours vary and should be checked by telephone. Gallery admission is free. * denotes a..."
    • ART GUIDEOctober 5, 2001 "A selective listing by critics of The Times of new or noteworthy art, design and photography exhibitions at New York museums and art galleries this weekend. Addresses, unless otherwise noted, are in Manhattan. Most galleries are closed on Sundays and Mondays, but hours vary and should be checked by telephone. Gallery admission is free. * denotes a..."
    • ART GUIDEOctober 12, 2001 "A selective listing by critics of The Times of new or noteworthy art, design and photography exhibitions at New York museums and art galleries this weekend. Addresses, unless otherwise noted, are in Manhattan. Most galleries are closed on Sundays and Mondays, but hours vary and should be checked by telephone. Gallery admission is free. * denotes a..."
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      Recent Comments

      "Hi Aimee, I think you mean Oreet Ashery? More information can be found in her profile on the Feminist Art Base: http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/feminist_art_base/gallery/oreet_ashery.php?i=266"
      By shelley

      "Hi, I am trying to find the name of the artist who took and is in the photograph that follows- http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/exhibitions/664/Global_Feminisms_Remix/image/216/Global_Feminisms_Remix._%7C08032007_-_03032008%7C._Installation_view. I believe the artist takes pictures of herself dressed as a man but then exposes her femaleness, as in the photo of her dressed as an Ascetic Jew exposing her breast. Can you help me find her information? Thanks in advance- Aimee Record"
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      "For more information on Louis Schanker and the New York Art Scene of the mid 1900's go to http://www.LouisSchanker.info "
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      The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
      For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the informative text panels written by the curator or organizer. Called "didactics," these panels are presented to the public during the exhibition's run, and we reproduce them here for your reference and archival interest. Please note that any illustrations on the original didactics have not been retained, and that the text may contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
      For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the objects from the Brooklyn Museum collection that were in the installation. These objects are listed here for your reference and archival interest, but the list may be incomplete and does not contain objects owned by other institutions or lenders.
      This section utilizes the New York Times API in order to display related materials in New York Times publications.