Exhibitions: Inventions for Victory

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    Inventions for Victory

    • Dates: October 23, 1942 through January 3, 1943
    • Collections: Decorative Arts
    Press Releases ?
    • February 14, 1942: The Brooklyn Museum announces that the first of its major exhibitions for the next season will be one of war-inspired new materials and new uses of familiar materials in the fields of architecture, house furnishings, appliances, clothing and accessories. This exhibition, which will be entitled “Inventions for Victory,” will open on October 22, 1942, and run through Sunday, January 10, 1943.

      This exhibition is announced as a specific example of the Brooklyn Museum’s reorganization of its exhibition schedule in coordination with the times.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1942 - 1946. 01-03/1942, 044. View Original

    • September 17, 1942: The Brooklyn Museum’s first major exhibition of the new season will be entitled “Inventions for Victory,” and will open to the public on Friday, October 23, to remain current through January 3. The public opening will be preceded by a private view on the afternoon of Thursday, October 22. The exhibition will be installed in the Museum’s large Special Exhibitions Gallery, first floor.

      “Inventions for Victory” will be an exhibition of new materials, and expansions and new uses of familiar materials which have resulted from the exigencies of wartime civilian production. The Museum presents this exhibition, demonstrative of American manufacturers’ ingenuity, as a part of its wartime program, both to familiarize the public with new consumer items now available and to forecast what the public may expect in post-war production. The material in the exhibition will be roughly divided into two categories: those currently available to the consumer, and those which, though of recent invention, have been lately added to the priorities list.

      In the section dealing with the new consumer products now available, the Museum expects to demonstrate that civilians may now procure household materials and clothing which will perform the functions previously performed by such well-known materials as wool, silk, rubber, metals, etc. In many instances these new products prove more satisfactory than the older ones and show promise of progressive replacement.

      (NOTE TO EDITORS – In view of the frequent changes in priorities, there cannot be a listing of specific items in the exhibition at this time.)

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1942 - 1946. 7-9/1942, 156. View Original

    • October 17, 1942: The Brooklyn Museum announces that, due to current transportation difficulties, the opening of its major exhibition, “Inventions for Victory,” has been postponed from Friday, October 23, to Friday, October 30. The invitation preview will now be held on Thursday, October 29, from four to six in the afternoon. The closing date of the show remains as previously announced, January 3, 1943.

      The following is a list of individuals and manufacturers from whom exhibition material has been received to date:

      The Emeloid Company. Inc.; Swift Manufacturing Company; Dazey Churn & Manufacturing Co., Inc.; Charles P. Cochrane Company; Joaquin Potteries; Grand Rapids Varnish Corp.; David Korn & Co., Inc.; The Sunlite Manufacturing Company; The Silex Company; Miss Steel Grayson; Mr. Calvert Coggeshall; H.H. Turchin Company; Whitehouse Research Bureau; Consolidated Trimming Company; Stanford D. Goodman Co., Inc.; Sneath Glass Company; Belmar Manufacturing Company; Nutone, Inc.; F. Shumacher & Company; Pittsburgh Corning Corp.; Leipzig & Lippe, Inc.; So-Klean Container Company; Armstrong Cork Company.

      The Rochow Swirl Mixer Company; Flashlight Company of America; Celanese Corporation of America; Humphrey-Horsley; Congoleum-Nairn Company; E.I. Dupont de Nemours, Rayon Division; Dow Chemical Company; Sandell Manufacturing Company; Comprehensive Fabrics, Inc., distributors of “Koroseal” for the B.F. Goodrich Company; Sally Victor, Inc.; Nathan Milstein, Inc.; Hampton Coat Company, Inc.; and Mr. C.N. Macksoud.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1942 - 1946. 10-12/1942, 166. View Original

    • October 25, 1942: A section of a prefabricated house will be one of the features in the Brooklyn Museum’s exhibition “Inventions for Victory,” which will open to the public on Friday, October 30, following an invitation preview the preceding afternoon. Since the Museum feels that prefabricated housing and minimum expense furnishings will have great post-war possibilities, a prominent place in the exhibition will be given to this furnished section.

      The section of the prefabricated house, showing two half rooms, was fabricated in the Museum’s carpenter shop from plans supplied by Humphrey-Horsley Company, Inc., New York, designers of prefabricated houses and other structural units. The house is created from panels weighing less than four pounds per square foot, or one hundred and twenty-eight pounds per panel. Two men can place and secure these panels to the structure in several minutes. All panels, either window, door or flat wall surfaces, are interchangeable in their structural entities in and of themselves. Just as millions of words are created from an alphabet of twenty-six letters, so innumerable types of houses may be designed from the twenty types of panels, giving standardization without monotony.

      The house is demountable and may be disassembled and re-erected without loss or injury to the structural units. If it is to be erected as a permanent house, the joints are glued with waterproof resin glue. The house may be made to conform to any standard plan and can be finished with either gable or flat roof.

      The two half rooms in the exhibition will be furnished as a demonstration of minimum expense in house furnishings. The actual pieces will be made of plywood in sound design, capable of mass production. Inexpensive cottons will be used for draperies and bed coverings, the floor covered with rugs of re-used wool, and the bed supplied with a cotton felt mattress.

      At one side of the house will be exhibited blue prints of a complete Humphrey-Horsley structure and a cross section of panels to show the actual construction of the joints.

      The cross section of paneling will have as insulation “Foamglas,” a new product of the Pittsburgh Corning Corporation. “Foamglas” has approximately the insulating qualities of cork, but has the advantage of being waterproof, verminproof, rotproof and fireproof. “Foamglas” is also self contained and self supporting.

      Since the list of exhibitors was issued in the release of October 17-18, additional material for the exhibition have been received from the following individuals and companies: Decorative Cabinet Corp., Masonite Corp., Miss Johanne Jansen, William Zinssor & Co., Strong Rug Company, Vera Maxwell, Helen Cookman, Miller Fabrics Corp., Mrs. Y. Kiviette, Hafner Associates, Alexander Smith & Sons Carpet Co., Chemex Corp., Raymode Negligees, Inc., Kleinert Rubber Co., and the National Dairy Products Co., Inc., producers of “Aralac,” and Breinig Bros.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1942 - 1946. 10-12/1942, 176-7. View Original 1 . View Original 2

    • Date unknown, approximately 1942: Wednesday, October 28, has been set by the Brooklyn Museum for the press preview of its forthcoming exhibition, INVENTIONS FOR VICTORY. The hours for this preview are from ten to four.

      The exhibition opens to the public on Friday, October 30, following a private view for invited guests, Thursday, October 29, four to six. The exhibition will be current through January 3, 1943.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1942 - 1946. 10-12/1942, 178. View Original

    • October 30, 1942: Today, (Friday, October 30) the Brooklyn Museum opens to the public its first major exhibition of the new season. Entitled “Inventions for Victory,” the exhibition is installed in the Special Exhibitions Galleries, first floor, where it will remain on view through Sunday, January 3, 1943.

      A private view of the show was held yesterday afternoon, (October 29) for Museum Members, the exhibitors and other invited guests.

      Presented by the Museum’s Industrial Division, “Inventions for Victory” is an exhibition of new materials and new uses of familiar materials, resulting from the exigencies of wartime production, in the fields of architecture, house furnishings and equipment, textiles, clothing and accessories.

      Though some of the exhibits are now procurable by civilians, the show is presented primarily as a forecast of what civilians may expect of production after Victory, not as an exhibition of “war babies” for current use. The majority of the exhibits are finished products based upon researches which have been expedited to meet wartime requirements. A few others are shown as examples of work in progress.

      The exhibits have been selected by the Industrial Division on the basis of the service which the object or material will perform in a particular function.

      A special feature of the exhibition is a section of a prefabricated house showing two half rooms and built by the Museum from a design supplied by an architect of such dwellings. This furnished section is given a prominent place in the exhibition since the Museum feels prefabricated housing and minimum expense furnishings will have great post-war possibilities.

      The house is created of panels weighing less than four pounds per square foot. Two men can place and secure these panels to the structure in several minutes. All panels – window, door or flat wall surface – are interchangeable in their structural entities in and of themselves. Innumerable types of houses may be designed from the twenty types of panels, giving standardization without monotony. A house built with these panels may be made to conform to any standard plan and can be finished with either a gable or flat roof.

      The two half-rooms in the house section are furnished as a demonstration of minimum expense in furnishings. The actual pieces are made of plywood in sound design, capable of mass production. The built-in furnishings, such as closets, bureau, shelves, and sofa, are also made of plywood. Inexpensive cottons are used for the draperies and bed coverings, the floors covered with rugs of re-used wool, and the bed supplied with a cotton felt mattress.

      At one side of the house-section are shown blue prints demonstrating some of the variety which may be achieved by different arrangements of the panel units. Also there is exhibited an actual cross section of panels, explanatory of the actual construction of the joints and interlined with a new insulation brick of glass.

      At the other side of the house-section there is set up a corner of a “Duration Dormitory,” accompanied by pictures presenting Government selection of floor coverings and projected plans for furnishing these units. It is expected that the findings made in the construction and furnishings of these dormitories will be of great value in planning post-war rehabilitation housing.

      In the plastic section there are included such metal-less objects as flashlights, fruit juice extractors, ice cube containers, measuring cups and mixers, knives and forks; also plastic insulation, piping, hose nozzles, trim and upholstery material, etc. Among the fabrics treated with plastic are an ironing pad, shower curtains, shower and bathing caps, upholstery and curtain materials, and a new permanent wrinkle-proof laminated rayon which is used for holding in shape shirt collars and cuff-less trousers.

      One of the large divisions of the exhibition is that of glass, showing the further developments in this field since the stimulation of World War I. Objects of glass cover a wide range: mail box, stove top, dish pan, washing machine agitator, hose nozzle, kitchen sink, furniture, and cooking utensils.

      Though the manufacture of rayon rags has been in process for some time, current events have increased their desirability. Several examples are shown of this type of rug which, in addition to performing the functions of wool rugs, has an amazing resilience and is moth, dirt and fire resistant.

      In this section on floor coverings are also exhibited linoleums with new backings: one with a duplex felt backing which does away with extra felt lining and double cementing; and another with a backing of a specially treated cotton which gives an unusually smooth surface and is less brittle and easier to cut than the average pre-war linoleum.

      The actual costumes in the exhibition are mostly of man-made fibers which are either not available in large quantities or are still in the experimental stage, but are shown as forecasts of materials to come. The exception to this is the brushed rayon material now on the market. Two garments of this material are exhibited: one a luxurious housecoat, the other a tweed coat lined with a brushed rayon fabric which makes an inner lining unnecessary. Also shown are two patent-applied-for patterns for dresses and coats to be fastened without buttons, zippers or hooks, using a tie of the fabric. These patterns are, in addition, so designed as to use a minimum of material.

      Though millinery is not on the priority list, there are certain decorations which are becoming scarce and, therefore the[re] are displayed three types of hats forecasting the plastic trend in millinery decoration.

      Other items in the exhibition include: metal-less garbage cans, ice boxes, coat hangers, fluorescent light fixtures, utility cabinets, curtain hangings, etc.

      LIST ATTACHED

      List of Articles in Exhibition
      “INVENTIONS FOR VICTORY”

      FOYER

      (Beginning on right as you enter and following in order around gallery.)

      Mail boxes and fluorescent lighting fixtures. Nutone, Inc.

      Fluorescent lighting fixture. Masonite Corporation

      “Trundle stick.” Leipzig & Lippe

      Wood and plastic stirrup pump. F. Shumacher & Company

      WALL CASE

      New lacquers and wood finishes. Grand Rapids Varnish Company; Wm. Zinssor & Company

      Garbage can, using masonite. So-Klean Container Company

      Masonite icebox. Masonite Corporation

      Wood and cardboard utility cabinet. Decorative Cabinet Company

      Patented fabric pleater for use without hooks, on smooth wooden rod. Consolidated Trimmings Corporation.

      WALL PANEL

      All-wood hangers. Belmar Manufacturing Company

      MAIN GALLERY

      PLATFORM I (to right as you enter)

      Robe of brushed knit jersey. Dupont rayon yarn. Raymode, Inc.

      “Aralac” costume designed by Helen Cookman. National Dairy Products Company

      Two “Wing-Over Cut” dresses designed by Steel Grayson.

      Ensemble designed by Vera Maxwell of “celanese.” Celanese Corporation of America

      Brushed knit jersey rayon housecoat of Dupont yarn. C.N. Macksoud

      WALL PEDESTAL

      Coat designed by Vera Maxwell, with brushed knit rayon lining of Dupont yarn. E.I. Dupont de Nemours, Rayon Division

      PILLAR PLATFORM

      Evening gown designed by Kiviette for the future, of “Cordura,” a Dupont rayon yarn. Shown with samples of cordura yarn as used in tires.

      ON WALL

      Three hats designed by Sally Victor; one of Dupont spun rayon and two of Dupont’s new “Bubblfil,” a continuous stream of cellophane air-filled bubbles. E. I. Dupont de Nemours, Rayon Division

      PLATFORM 2

      Two occasional tables of glass and wood. Sandel Manufacturing Company

      Mirror of “black” glass, and all-glass table. Turchin Glass Company

      WALL CASE 1

      Aquarium and vase of glass block, decorative glass bubbles and marbles, glass block book end with etched design, ashtray carved from glass block, plate glass tray that is heat resistant, green and opaque “Sea Spray” glass tableware. Turchin Glass Company

      WALL CASE 2

      Open flame glassware: double boiler, kettle, bean pot, frying pan, chicken fryer of Triplex glass distributed by Stanford P. Goodman Company, and a coffee maker produced by the Silex Company.

      BACK OF WALL CASE NO. 2

      Blue prints of war housing dormitory. Federal Public Housing Authorities

      PLATFORM NO. 3

      Three-dimensional architect’s blue print of a section of a war dormitory, on which is indicated the room appointments. Federal Public Housing Authorities

      PLATFORM NO. 4

      Drawings and patterns for plywood furniture and examples of plywood furniture made from the patterns. Designed by C. Coggeshall

      WALL PANEL
      Bracketless shelf and wooden hinges. Whitehouse [sic] Research Bureau

      CROSS SECTION OF A PREFABRICATED HOUSE
      Designed by Humphrey-Horsley Company

      End view of Living Room showing minimum standard furniture of plywood, consisting of: folding dining table, two chairs, two serving table on rollers, built-in book shelves and built-in sofa. Designed by C. Coggeshall

      Hand-woven rug of re-used wool. Strong Rug Company

      Lighting fixture. Designed by Kurt Versin

      End view of Bedroom, containing: bed and stool of plywood, built-in chest, cupboard and clothes closet, and plywood utility unit. Designed by C. Coggehsall

      Hand-woven rug of re-used wool. Strong Rug Company

      PEDESTAL IN FRONT OF HOUSE

      Sample of “Foamglas”. Pittsburgh Corning Corporation

      CURVED WALL PANEL

      Scale drawings of demountable prefabricated houses: multiple housing, dormitory and airplane hangar. Humphrey-Horsley Company

      FREE-STANDING PEDESTAL

      Cross section of a Humphrey-Horsley panel showing joint construction and insulation with “Foamglas.”

      ON WALL

      Three samples of linoleum showing backing of specially treated cotton fabric, and backing of a special felt made from rags. Armstrong Cork Company

      Two pieces of linoleum; one old type, and one new with built-in duplex backing. Congoleum-Nairn Company

      Bathroom rug of “celanese” acetate rayon. Celanese Corporation of America

      All face rayon rug of Dupont yarn. Charles P. Cochrane Company

      All face rayon rug of Dupont yarn. Alexander Smith Carpet Company

      WALL CASE NO. 3

      Pottery for open flame cooking, consisting of sauce pans, double boiler, frying pans, etc. Joaquin Potteries, Courtesy of Rheta Coles

      WALL CASE NO. 4

      Glass dish pan, flashlight case, razor blade sharpener, hose nozzle, washing machine agitator, stove top, and mail box. Sneath Glass Company

      Laboratory glass coffee maker with birch handle. Chemex Company

      PILLAR PEDESTAL

      Glass sink. Sneath Glass Company

      WALL CASE NO. 5

      Ice cube tray with plastic cups. Swift Manufacturing Company

      Hose nozzle of a Dow Chemical Company plastic. H. B. Sherman Manufacturing Company

      All plastic fruit juicer. Dazey Churn & Manufacturing Company

      Two plastic mixers. Rochow Swirl Mixer Company

      Plastic fork and knives. Emeloid Company

      “Ristlite” flashlight of plastic. American Flashlight Company

      WALL CASE NO.6

      Products of “Koroseal,” manufactured by the B. F. Goodrich Company

      Extruded strips, wire insulation, semi-rigid tubing, flexible tubing; moulded gaskets. Comprehensive Fabrics, Inc.

      Miniature raincoat of "Koroseal" treated marquisette. Warren Featherbone Company

      Umbrella of “Koroseal” treated marquisette. Haas-Jordan Company

      “Koroseal” ironing pad. The Sunlite Manufacturing Company

      WALL CASE NO. 7
      Plastics manufactured by the Dow Chemical Company.

      Miniature table top with moulded “ethocel” trim. Macklanburg-Duncan Company

      Rattan-like upholstery of woven extruded “saran”; moulded and threaded plastic pipe joint; rigid piping, one example with welded joint; flexible “saran” piping and moulded plastic joints; woven and twisted cords of extruded plastic. Dow Chemical Company

      Insect screen of extruded plastic. Chicopee Sales Corporation

      WALL CASE NO. 8

      Samples of collars and cuff-less trousers interlined with sanforized and wrinkle-proof “lamicol,” a pro[duct] of the Celanese Corporation of America.

      Blanket of 50% “celanese" rayon, 25% wool, and 25% cotton. The Celanese Corporation of America

      WALL POLE NO. 1 (left to right)

      Plastic yarn upholstery fabric (“Velon”), heat resistant and waterproof. Hafner Associates

      “Celanese” rayon satin with heavy faille back, split proof. Celanese Corporation of America

      Brocaded upholstery fabric with plastic thread. Hafner Associates

      WALL POLE NO. 2 (left to right)

      Two “celanese” sheers, black sheet for dim-out. Celanese Corporation of America

      “Koroseal” treated curtain material. Comprehensive Fabrics, Inc.

      WALL POLE NO. 3 (left to right)

      “Koroseal” treated shower curtain. Comprehensive Fabrics, Inc.

      Permanent moire shower curtain of “celanese” rayon. Celanese Coporation of America.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1942 - 1946. 10-12/1942, 180-8. View Original 1 . View Original 2 . View Original 3 . View Original 4 . View Original 5 . View Original 6 . View Original 7 . View Original 8 . View Original 9

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    The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
    For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the informative text panels written by the curator or organizer. Called "didactics," these panels are presented to the public during the exhibition's run, and we reproduce them here for your reference and archival interest. Please note that any illustrations on the original didactics have not been retained, and that the text may contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
    For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the objects from the Brooklyn Museum collection that were in the installation. These objects are listed here for your reference and archival interest, but the list may be incomplete and does not contain objects owned by other institutions or lenders.
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