Exhibitions: New Black Artists

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New Black Artists

  • Dates: October 7, 1969 through November 9, 1969
  • Collections: American Art
Press Releases ?
  • August 1969: The first recent exhibition of Black artists in a major New York museum will open Tuesday, October 7, 1969 at The Brooklyn Museum, Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn.

    Conceived by Edward Taylor, Executive Director of The Harlem Cultural Council, the show will feature the work of 12, predomina[n]tly young, relatively unknown artists and will consist of 49 works - 30 paintings and 19 sculptures. They were selected by Mr. Taylor with the help of Robert Luck, Assistant Director of the American Federation of Arts.

    The Brooklyn Museum was asked to hold the exhibition after Mr. Taylor was successful in his efforts to obtain funding from The Urban Center at Columbia University and was assured of the cooperation of the School of the Arts and the Curator of Art Properties at Columbia University.

    Upon closing November 10, the exhibition will move to Columbia University, where it will be open from November 20 to December the 12th.

    Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1953 - 1970. 1969, 010. View Original

  • September 1969: The work of twelve “New Black Artists” will be on exhibit at The Brooklyn Museum, Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, October 7 through November 10. The exhibition, made possible by a pilot project developed by The Urban Center of Columbia University, was organized by The Harlem Cultural Council. The Brooklyn Museum is the first large New York museum to host a recent exhibition by Black artists.

    Upon closing, the show will move to Columbia University where it will be open from November 20 to December 12. The American Federation of Arts, which helped to organize the exhibition, plans to include it in its traveling exhibition program.

    The show does not purport to make a doctrinaire statement about Black Art; however, it does hope to raise the valid question of the role of Black feeling and experience in shaping the expression of Black artists. It is seen as explorative, and as a tool for developing dialogue and creative exchange between cultural and educational institutions and the predomina[n]tly Black communities in which they are now located. In addition, it is an opportunity to introduce the 30 paintings and 19 sculptures by relatively unknown artists to a wider audience.

    The participating artists, who work in a variety of personal styles, are: Ellsworth Ausby, Clifford Eubanks, Jr., Hugh Harrell, William J. Howell, Tonnie Jones, Charles McGee, Ted Moody, Joseph Overstreet, Anderson J. Pigatt, Daniel Pressley, Charles Searles and Erik W. A. Stephenson. The group, although individualistic in approach, have a common denominator in their concern for communication and Black identity. They also share a belief in dramatic statement, a feeling for brilliant color and a sense of form that is deliberately simple and straightforward.

    An illustrated catalogue, with a foreword by Edward Taylor, Executive Director of The Harlem Cultural Council, will be available.

    Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1953 - 1970. 1969, 011. View Original

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"Hi Aimee, I think you mean Oreet Ashery? More information can be found in her profile on the Feminist Art Base: http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/feminist_art_base/gallery/oreet_ashery.php?i=266"
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"Hi, I am trying to find the name of the artist who took and is in the photograph that follows- http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/exhibitions/664/Global_Feminisms_Remix/image/216/Global_Feminisms_Remix._%7C08032007_-_03032008%7C._Installation_view. I believe the artist takes pictures of herself dressed as a man but then exposes her femaleness, as in the photo of her dressed as an Ascetic Jew exposing her breast. Can you help me find her information? Thanks in advance- Aimee Record"
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The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the informative text panels written by the curator or organizer. Called "didactics," these panels are presented to the public during the exhibition's run, and we reproduce them here for your reference and archival interest. Please note that any illustrations on the original didactics have not been retained, and that the text may contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the objects from the Brooklyn Museum collection that were in the installation. These objects are listed here for your reference and archival interest, but the list may be incomplete and does not contain objects owned by other institutions or lenders.
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