Exhibitions: National Print Exhibition, 17th Biennial

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    Arts of Africa, Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden
  • 2nd Floor
    Arts of Asia and the Islamic World
  • 3rd Floor
    Egyptian Art, European Paintings
  • 4th Floor
    Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art
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    Luce Center for American Art

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Hiroshige's One Hundred Famous Views of Edo

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    On View: Hand Cross

    Ethiopian Crosses
    Christianity most likely arrived in Ethiopia in the first century. The conversion of King Ezana in 330

     

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    National Print Exhibition, 17th Biennial

    Press Releases ?
    • May 4, 1970: Prints with a message will characterize the Seventeenth National Print Biennial Exhibition to open June 2 at The Brooklyn Museum, Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn. As in the past, the purpose of the print exhibition is to introduce and encourage new talent. Its primary interest is the artist who does not as yet have a gallery. Admission is free.

      The exhibition, assembled by Miss Jo Miller, Curator of Prints and Drawings for the Museum, will include approximately one-hundred and fifty prints selected with a concern for artists who make graphic statements, rather than accomplished technicians who focus on media.

      In the introduction to the catalog prepared for the show Miss Miller states, "In the 1960’s the print grew to door size and our first look into the 1970's suggests that prints may become not only smaller but more intimate. In many instances, the artists invite you closer to read and contemplate his work. At the beginning of a chaotic decade this message is important and reaffirms our conviction that art is a constructive endeavor ranking high on the list of humane and compassionate activities."

      Artists who will be represented are: Marshall Arisman, Robert Bermelin, John Cage, David Finkbeiner, Al Held, Masuo Ikeda, Robert Indiana, Nicholas Krushenick, Roy Lichtenstein, Byron NcKeeby, Ed O’Connell, Kenneth Price and Edward Ruscha, Arnaldo Pomodoro, Saul Steinberg, Carol Summers and Richard Zeimann.

      Brooklyn Museum Archives. Records of the Department of Public Information. Press releases, 1953 - 1970. 1970, 006. View Original

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      "Hi Aimee, I think you mean Oreet Ashery? More information can be found in her profile on the Feminist Art Base: http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/feminist_art_base/gallery/oreet_ashery.php?i=266"
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      Prints, Drawings and Photographs

      Over the years, the collections of the Brooklyn Museum have been organized and reorganized in different ways. Collections of the former Department of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs include works on paper that may fall into other categories: American Art, European Art, Asian Art, Contemporary Art, and Photography.
      The Brooklyn Museum Archives maintains a collection of historical press releases. Many of these have been scanned and made available on our Web site. The releases range from brief announcements to extensive articles; images of the original releases have been included for your reference. Please note that all the original typographical elements, including occasional errors, have been retained. Releases may also contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
      For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the informative text panels written by the curator or organizer. Called "didactics," these panels are presented to the public during the exhibition's run, and we reproduce them here for your reference and archival interest. Please note that any illustrations on the original didactics have not been retained, and that the text may contain errors as a result of the scanning process. We welcome your feedback about corrections.
      For select exhibitions, we have made available some or all of the objects from the Brooklyn Museum collection that were in the installation. These objects are listed here for your reference and archival interest, but the list may be incomplete and does not contain objects owned by other institutions or lenders.
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