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Read about the exhibit

This painting was chosen
79%
of the time over other paintings.

There might be a slight positive correlation between experience and favorability in this painting; The more a person knows about Indian Paintings, the more likely they are to like this painting! Jump to graph

Men slightly favor this painting. Jump to graph

Participants offered 204 unique terms to describe this painting! See them all

Caption: Stalling Elephant India (Deccan, Bijapur), mid 17th century Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper Overall: 6 1/2 x 4 7/8 in. (16.5 x 12.4 cm) Brooklyn Museum. Gift of Dr. Bertram H. Schaffner in honor of his 90th birthday, 2002.38

Label: This delicately-painted image shows an elephant refusing to obey its two drivers (mahouts). Elephants were prized possessions for India’s aristocracy, and they were used for transportation in battle, when hunting, and on ritual occasions. Elephants consume large quantities of food each day, so they are exceedingly expensive to keep. Because elephants are so large, and because taming elephants can be difficult and dangerous, these animals became important emblems of a ruler’s power and leadership skills.

Close examination of this painting reveals that the body of the elephant, its saddle blanket, and the costumes of the two mahouts are rendered in marbleized patterns, a decorative effect that is achieved by swirling oil-based paints on the surface of water and then lowering paper carefully onto the paint. The artist would have had to repeat this process at least four times to achieve the different colors and patterns in this painting, using stencils or some sort of resist coating to keep the paint in the desired areas. This highly specialized technique was practiced briefly in only one or two courts in the southern Indian region known as the Deccan and appears to have fallen out of use after the seventeenth century.

Biggest Reactions

These groups differed the most from the average rating

25-34 y.o. women with "no experience" 35-44 y.o. women with "some experience" 45-54 y.o. women with "some experience" 45-54 y.o. women with "more than a little experience" 45-54 y.o. women with "above average experience"
Liked this painting:        
+5%
Preferred others:
-18%
-6%
-6%
-6%
 

Experience

There might be a slight positive correlation between experience and favorability in this painting; The more a person knows about Indian Paintings, the more likely they are to like this painting!

Not so much Some More than a little Above average Expert
Liked this painting:      
+5%
+6%
Preferred others:
-6%
-1%
-1%
   

Age

0-17 * 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ *
Liked this painting:
+1%
+3%
     
+2%
+4%
+13%
Preferred others:    
-1%
-1%
-3%
     

Gender

Men slightly favor this painting.

Women Men
Liked this painting:  
+2%
Preferred others:
-1%
 

* We have low confidence in this metric because relatively few people in this group (less than 50) rated this object.

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