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Read about the exhibit

This painting was chosen
76%
of the time over other paintings.

Participants offered 158 unique terms to describe this painting! See them all

Caption: King Solomon and His Court India (Deccan, Hyderabad), 1875-1900 Opaque watercolor and gold on paper Overall: 19 11/16 x 11 7/8 in. (50.0 x 30.2 cm) Brooklyn Museum. Gift of James S. Hayes, 59.205.16

Label: As in the Jewish and Christian traditions, Islam promotes the ancient king Solomon as a model ruler, wise and just. This painting celebrates one element of the considerable lore about Solomon that developed outside of orthodox scriptural accounts: the belief that Solomon’s influence was so great that he was able to rule the kingdoms of animals and angels. Images of Solomon’s court populated by all manner of creatures, celestial beings, and even demons, were very popular in the court of the Ottoman rulers of Turkey; this fantastic painting, from the southern Indian city of Hyderabad, appears to draw on a Turkish prototype.

Biggest Reactions

These groups differed the most from the average rating

35-44 y.o. women with "some experience" 55-64 y.o. women with "some experience" 18-24 y.o. women with "more than a little experience" 25-34 y.o. women with "above average experience" 35-44 y.o. women with "above average experience"
Liked this painting:
+5%
   
+5%
+7%
Preferred others:  
-8%
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Experience

Not so much Some More than a little Above average Expert
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+1%
+8%
Preferred others:    
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Age

0-17 * 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ *
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0%
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Preferred others:
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-6%

Gender

Women Men
Liked this painting:
0%
 
Preferred others:  
-1%

* We have low confidence in this metric because relatively few people in this group (less than 50) rated this object.

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