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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I don't think I've seen snow depicted in this way before.
What about it feels innovative or unique to you? It kind of goes against the natural order of events, or how we think of the progress of snow, right? Usually snow falls down, but this reversal, this violent sweeping upward, creates this sense of unease, and even violence.
Yes, you're right about the upwards motion, it seems cyclonic. The paint seems so thin in places. Can I see the canvas surface?
That's a great question, I can't tell from here, I would have to go up and look at it up close.
There's super thick paint next to untouched canvas, I think.
The artist painted these in Paris at the height of Impressionism, we can see this influence in the broken brushstrokes, but looked also to Gustave Courbet and Realism, note the mottled surfaces throughout. The condition of this picture is actually pristine. When it was treated in 2010 for the current hang, our conservators only removed a yellowed varnish layer and found the original paint intact.
Your colleague may be right. I see thicker paint in that grey brown too. I think now it might be washes!
Also, something about these figures reminds me of Goya's May 3rd. They're both horrific scenes.
I really like your Goya comparison. Vereshchagin's art, like Goya's, really does show us the horrors of war!
Were they painting at the same time?
I'm certain that Vereshchagin was aware of Goya's work as this was completed some 70 years later. Goya passed away in 1828, about 20 years before Vereshchagin was born.
Ah, there you go then. Dates are never my strong point! Thanks! I much prefer this to Google.
Thank you!
Why is the woman in this painting in the dark?
It's interesting that the parlor is more brightly lit and becomes the focus of the scene while she is off to the side and in the darker staircase area.
The title does provide a clue. Someone may be paying her a formal visit at her home. If a woman chose not to receive guests at that moment, she could tell her maid to tell the visitor that she was "not at home." She seems to be excusing herself from the scene and moving into the private, darker part of the house.
Yes, it looks as if she's hiding. But it's a great approach to portrait exactly this moment!
Indeed! We've probably all been "not at home" at some point when someone has stopped by.
What are the figures as you walk in meant to be?
They are titled "The Burghers of Calais" and were made by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. They depict an episode from the Hundred Years' War between France and England. In 1347, after the city of Calais had been under siege for eleven months, six prominent citizens offered their lives to the English king, Edward III, in return for his promise to spare the city. Upon hearing of their bravery, the English Queen Philippa interceded and obtained their release.
In 1884, Rodin was commissioned by the city of Calais to produce a monument honoring the six burghers. Rodin rejected the established conventions of public sculpture and portrayed the men not as glorious heroes, but as troubled and isolated individuals brought together by their anguish and common purpose.
Where in U.S. is Mt. Rosalie located?
The two snowy peaks just below the highest cloud cover in this view belong to the mountain first dubbed Mt. Rosalie but today known as Mt. Evans near Denver, Colorado. Today, another nearby peak is designated as Rosalie, while a neighboring mountain, fittingly, became Mount Bierstadt in 1914. Alfred Bierstadt would have people view his paintings through looking glasses to better see details of the works. Feel free to try this method of viewing his expansive landscape yourself! Look through your hand like a telescope, and maybe you'll see something surprising.
Was the artist a soldier?
With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, Vereshchagin a Russian who was living in Paris at the time, volunteered for the staff of the Russian army. He wanted to go to the front lines in order to "see with my own eyes a regular European war." He was assigned without salary or uniform. Although he fought actively in the war, he was not strictly or exclusively a soldier. He also acted as a correspondent, documenting the war of his own volition and as sanctioned by the military.
Can you tell me about "Sa-Iset the Younger"?
We can tell by his elaborately pleated and knotted garment that he is of a very high rank in society. From the inscription, we know that he was Sa-Iset the Younger from Asyut an official who held the title Overseer of the Granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Is this Arizona? California?
Great question! O'Keeffe would collect bones, rocks and other findings from her walks in New Mexico for these paintings. This is a really evocative piece. She was very adamant about not explaining her work to other people and she didn't like to discuss what different things symbolized in her art. So, you're free to make your own interpretations.
I always wondered what she was all about. It seems she was serendipitous with object selection. And why not!
I agree! Very serendipitous! Here is a quote from O'Keefe about her first trip to New Mexico: "The first year I was out here, because there were no flowers, I began picking up bones...So I brought home the bleached bones as my symbols of the desert. To me they are as beautiful as anything I know. To me they are strangely more living than the animals walking around—hair, eyes, and all, with their trails switching."
Thanks!
You're welcome!
What is this?
You are looking at five glazed tiles set in a wooden frame depicting female figures in the Classical style. They were probably displayed in a show room. They were designed by Isaac Broome and date to approximately 1880.
Thanks!
I would like to know more about this sculpture, please.
It dates to 2371–2298 B.C.E, which is relatively early in ancient Egyptian history, during the Old Kingdom. His name and job titles are written in the vertical strips of hieroglyphs beside his legs and feet. The pigment is remarkably well preserved!
What was the purpose of this piece?
Pieces like these were often placed in tombs. Also, the flat surfaces surrounding the figure create space for inscriptions and additional images like the three figures you can see on the sides, probably Nakhtsaes' wife and sons.
Thanks! What do you do think the sculptors class was in that society?
Sculptor was an important job in Ancient Egypt as sculpture played a key role in religion and the afterlife. Most sculptors were part of workshops. They worked together under a master artist who provided examples and training for apprentices to copy.
Do you know what the hieroglyphs on the chair say?
Recorded beside his legs are his name, Nakhtsaes, and his titles.
One other question from this exhibit, are there other pieces by Winslow Homer in the Museum? I see two here and I wasn't familiar with him, but I am now interested to learn more!
We do have a few other works by Homer in our collection but only one is on view. It is called "In the Mountains" and is an oil on canvas, you can find it in the 5th floor American Identities galleries.
Excellent, thank you!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.