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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
Was Komai Japanese-American? Is this a face he is depicting?
Yes, Komai was Japanese American. In fact, in the 40s, he spent time in a Japanese internment camp. And, yes, the anthropomorphic chair is indeed designed to suggest a human face!
Do we know if Luigi Lucioni ever worked with Tamara de Lempicka?
That's a really interesting question, and I can see why you would wonder that. There's something similar about the way they both depict the human face, and they were working at the same time. However, I don't believe their paths ever directly overlapped.       
I. Lorser Feitelson's "Diana at the Bath," also in the collection here, also reminds me of de Lempicka. Its female figures are very elongated and stylized in the same way.
Lucioni definitely likes to work in the same very polished style that she does! -- all the details are so crisp and the surfaces are so smooth.
I really like this piece. Are there other O'Keeffe's that are similar in the museum?
Yes, we do have two other O'Keeffe paintings currently on view.
One is a desert landscape with other objects and one shows a composition of several trees. They are both located in the same installation you're in right now, American Identities, but in other rooms.
And if you would like to see cityscapes by other artists working in the 1920s-1940s, go through the door next to this painting you'll find some in the next gallery.
How was this painting made?
Pat Steir keeps the canvas vertical and lets the paint run down the surface. She thins the paint first, so that it streams down in fine rivulets and drips.
You can see how gravity pulls the paint downward. There's an element of chance because she can't control the paint once it starts moving. I think it gives the finished painting a very mysterious effect.
What can you tell me about General Blackburne?
John Blackburne Woodward was a lifelong Brooklyn resident who was active in business and local politics. He also served as a general in the Civil War.
It's beautiful and so well preserved! Where would it have been displayed?
We actually don't know what building these tiles were originally placed in, but many buildings from the same period include similar tiles. One example with particularly similar tiling is the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Damascus, Syria, in the 16th century.
These tiles would have originally been part of a much larger decorative scheme. It would have been amazing to experience such rooms in the 16th century!
What used to live in this shell?
That is actually a very old Conch shell. So a sea snail once lived inside of there! It was used as a ceremonial drinking cup for liquids made from the yaupon plant. It is believed that the drink made from the yaupon plant was hallucinogenic, connecting the drinker with the falcon spirit that's engraved on the shell. 
Also, what are "ear spools?"
Ear spools are like very large "gauged" earrings. If you look in the nearby galleries, you can see many examples in gold!
Ouch!
Yes, it would hurt if you got the extra large ones right away (and the most prominent pair in the next gallery are LARGE), but the people who wore ear spools, stretched their ear lobes slowly to avoid the pain.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.