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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I'm curious about the use of folding stools in Versailles. Today, we think of folding furniture as practical for compact spaces or for shipping, but why did folks bother with folding furniture in the Palace of Versailles?
Folding stools were used by ancient Roman senators and so stools like this held allusions to Rome's imperial past. They signified power and so the design was used in Versailles. When not in use, such stools would have been placed around the walls of a room but would not have been folded. Their portability was useful in rooms that had many uses.
I went to the official Versailles website, and here's a direct quote for you: "folding chairs and seating chairs will testify to the revolution that the 18th century brought about in the history of furniture, a reflection of the evolving tastes of a society enamoured by modernity and wanting to live in comfort and luxury."
Is there a functional purpose to this mirror that inverts and distorts the image?
Indeed there was, the mirror would help illuminate the room by reflecting all of the candles in the space. It would also help show off the fancy furnishings of the elite who would own these Federal-era mirrors, since it gives a wide-angle view of the room.
Can you tell me what this green, yellow, and red model is for?
This is a model for a folding picnic table by Henry P. Glass Associates from 1961.
How many works by Monet does this museum have?
The Museum has 5 paintings by Claude Monet and currently two are on view in the Beaux-Arts Court. This one is called "Houses of Parliament." 
Along with a third Monet from our collections, we also have some very special Monet paintings on loan right now in our Special Exhibition on the 4th floor about Francisco Oller. There are paintings by Cézanne, Pissarro, Caillebotte and many other Impressionist artists in the show. I highly recommend taking a look!
I wanted to know more about Mlle Rosina, the subject of this painting.
This work is actually a "portrait" in quotations because it isn't actually a portrait of the woman Mademoiselle Rosina. Huntington based this work on a favorite model.
The woman is intended to be an ideal figure, personifying the art of drawing and the spirit of creativity. This was something artists commonly did at the time -- portraying women as symbols of virtues or other abstract ideas.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes he did! Especially earlier in his career (in the 1860s), before he came to his most famous subject (ballet dancers), Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends.  He was interested in capturing people in unguarded moments, and showing something of their psychology. Although portraits are usually commissioned, Degas never painted a portrait on commission. He always maintained a certain independence.
Who was wealthier? Abigail Pickman or Dona Cervantes?
Both women were wealthy. Even if we didn't know anything about them, we could guess this, because portraits were luxury items in the 18th century and only elite owned fine portraits like these. There might be clues of their status based on their clothing.
I think Cervantes' clothes look more expensive because of the materials and the amount of work that went into making them
Great observation! Typically during this period the Spanish dressed in this very luxurious way. Spain was exporting gold and silver from places like Mexico, but the English-American colonies (where Copley painted portraits, in New England) were not doing business on that scale so the Spanish territories often had more money.
What are the books under the table next to Washington?
The books underneath the table, including one titled The Constitution and Laws of the United States, refer to American history and politics. Washington wanted to show that he was a learned man, despite having limited formal education like most men in his high political position. His father had died when he was young, and the family couldn't send him to school. He was mostly self-taught.
Was "The Dinner Party" intended for this exact room?
  No, it wasn't. Elizabeth Sackler purchased it for the Brooklyn Museum under the provision that we would build a feminist art gallery for it. The Museum and Judy Chicago worked with designers to ensure that the piece would be able to stay on view long-term with minimal damage. Many considerations have gone into the installation to protect the work, such as the low lighting and the mirrored walls that help to reflect and maximize it. 
That's interesting. Has it ever been moved?
Since its installation, no. But when Judy Chicago first created the work it travelled the world for 9 years, visiting 16 venues in 6 countries on 3 continents, reaching a viewing audience of 15 million. Thankfully it has found its permanent home here and can finally rest a bit.   :~)
Do you know why she did not personalize the glasses and silverware on the table?
That's a fantastic question! On a purely visual level, I believe the sameness of the flatware and chalice is key in uniting all of the very different place settings. Chicago's conceptual reasoning is that despite how different these women were, and despite whatever they accomplished or unique their lives were, they were all essentially treated the same by society. Their accomplishments and contributions were all similarly erased and forgotten. 
I really enjoy how the silverware and cups are just slightly larger than human scale. It gives a really goddess-like feeling to these names.You can almost imagine 7-foot tall women seated at the table, and how powerful an image that would be.
Definitely the perfect size for those women! It does give more importance to the plates and settings and also allows for an easier read of the art.
Thank you so much for all the info!
You're very welcome!
Who was the designer?
That is the Spartan Table Radio and it was designed by Walter Dorwin Teague, an American designer born in 1883. This radio is an example of the streamlined American design popular in the 1930s. The Arens Meat Slicer in Connecting Cultures on the first floor is another excellent example of this design style.
Great, thank you!
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.