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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the death cart!
Me too! Although the piece depicts human bones, the only thing on the object that may be human is the hair (and we have not yet tested it). The potential human hair is held in place with a piece of animal hide/skin.
It is a miniature version of one of the death carts pulled in processions by Roman Catholic penitent societies in Mexico and the American Southwest during Holy Week. Some carts carry images of the suffering Jesus. This one's passenger may be a female: Doña Sebastiana, the Angel of Death.
The "tooth" work along the crown molding, is that wood or bronze?
That molding is all very fine wood with metallic paint applied.
Ah, metallic paint! Thanks for checking.
The rest of the family's apartment was decorated in a way that was more typical for affluent NYC-ers of this time: historical styles borrowed from 18th century France, etc. But they invited the design firm to do something new and different with this study!
Very interesting! Thanks so much for your help.
You are welcome! Enjoy the rest of the 4th floor, and the rest of your visit. We'll be here to chat if you have any additional thoughts or questions to share.
Do you know what you call these window treatments? Like the name of the style?
These are called 'balloon curtains.' Curtains were available only to the most affluent families in the 18th century American colonies. They were most commonly made from wool and they were often color-coordinated with the rest of the room.
These aren't the original curtains from the Cupola House, of course, they're a curatorial re-construction of something that's accurate to the period.
I like how they are bunched up and gather as they are pulled up. I appreciate these details in the rooms.
I agree, and they're so full. They require lots of material! The curators have put so much research and thought into installing these rooms, it's amazing.
For real! Kudos to them, and to you for looking these things up.
This is cool, what's it for? Holding flowers?
No, actually! Although the word 'vase' in the title would make you believe that. It was actually a sort of advertisement for the US during the country's centennial. It was put on display to showcase important ideas and innovations happening at the time, 1870s, in the United States. If you look closely at the vignettes you'll see a woman with a sewing machine and telegraph wires.
Ah, thanks!
You're welcome!
Can you tell me a little about it?
Yes! To make this specific work, Deborah Kass photographed herself posing just like one of Andy Warhol's Self-Portraits and then she painted her new self-portrait in Warhol's style, in multiples with bright screen-printed colors. Kass is inserting herself into an iconic work from art history, but in a way that asserts her own identity as a female artist.       
She has produced many works inspired by Warhol's most famous paintings, inserting herself or another woman -- for example, in her "Jewish Jackie" series, she put Barbra Streisand's face into paintings that otherwise look like Warhol's paintings of Jacqueline Kennedy! In the work you're looking at right now, Kass is making us think about originality and the process of making art as well as about gender.
Thank you!
Can you tell me about this one?
Deana Lawson is a Brooklyn artist but has photographed across the world. This one is so mysterious! It makes us think about a person or a body without actually seeing that person/body.
The artist was visiting a beach in Jamaica that's popular with locals rather than tourists. She asked to photograph a woman who was watching TV on this cot/mat in a nearby beach shack. Then the woman excused herself and left, and Lawson noticed the imprint of the woman's body on the towel, and the marks of her sweat, and the flies that started to gather there (in the heat!). This ended up being the photo that she used from that day.
So it was an impromptu moment, not something staged, the artist liked to remember how this happened!
Very interesting. I keep going back to look at it. Almost as if I expect the woman to appear back on the towel!
I like that! It's like a picture of absence the person just got up and could come back at any moment, right?
Why are there stars of David as well as a Maltese cross on this piece?
Because the Christian church accepts the Old Testament as a pre-cursor to the New Testament, the Star of David you see was an acceptable symbol to have in a stained glass windows. These motifs were used often in stained glass windows in churches and other public spaces in the mid 1850s when stained glass was beginning to see a revival in the US. Sharp designed windows for churches all over the east coast. The Met Museum actually has another one by Sharp that has similar motifs to the ones you see there.
What language is on these reliefs? Is it lost to us or can people today understand it?
The writing system is called Cuneiform and the language itself is called Akkadian. There are many scholars who can read Akkadian, but it is very difficult to learn. Let me see if I can find you some translation.
Ok. Yes, I'd like to know the gist of what it says!
Here is a sample: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Much of the text you see has a similar theme, Ashurnasirpal II glorifies the gods and reminds people of his own greatness. These reliefs are originally from the walls of his palace.
If the text glorifies the king, then why is it juxtaposed against mythological beings?
That juxtaposition serves two main purposes. One is that, in Ashurnasirpal II's time in Assyria, kings were understood as at least partially divine so it would make sense in that context to place him with other supernatural beings.
Another is that one role of the king was to worship and glorify the gods on behalf of his kingdom/empire. They occupy the same space so that Ashurnasirpal II can directly worship and honor them including delivering offerings. The winged figures are called genies and also serve as guardians protecting the king and his palace.
I saw this portrait of George Washington also in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. So is the portrait here painted by the same person? Are they the same work of art?
Gilbert Stuart did paint multiple versions of this portrait of George Washington, and one of them is at the National Portrait Gallery! This format is known as Stuart's "Lansdowne" portrait of Washington. Washington posed for Stuart in 1795 and 1796, when he was President. He was 63 at the time.
The one in the National Portrait Gallery is Stuart's very first version of this full-length portrait of Washington, and then he made copies of it for other clients.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.