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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is that a real piano?
That type of piano is actually called a 'spinet,' it is just a smaller version of a piano or harpsichord and yes, it is real! It is not original to the home, though.
It is original to the time period! It is often hard to get items original to the rooms because the architecture was collected after the time of the original owners. The Milligan Parlor and Library (also on view on the 4th floor) have many of the original furnishings, we even have some receipts on display. But what curators try to do when they cannot get the originals of the rooms is to furnish them in ways that they would have been in that time period.
The pose this woman takes in her portrait is amazing, especially considering the time at which it was painted. It's very daring!
Indeed, it was unusual for a woman to pose that way in the 1870s. You could easily contrast it with other images of women in that gallery like women looking off to the side, sitting quietly, looking as if they were waiting to be looked "at."
The sitter is an actress named Sarah Cowell. According to a book from 1908, she was a New Yorker who made her debut in a theater on Union Square in 1878 (a year after this painting was made). She also performed in England. She was especially known for performing works based on the writing of the poet Robert Browning. She was married to a man named William Lemoyne, and she continued to perform after she was married, also bold! A final interesting fact about this is that is was painted by a woman -- these were women with professional ambitions.
I've never seen anything like this - it's very haunting.
I agree! The artist's style is often deliberately awkward, and he seems to have a Surrealist sensibility sometimes.
We have a good quote from the artist about this work, "I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human -- both intimate and completely foreign."
He has also mentioned the fear that is part of being a new parent. His wife posed for this painting, in fact, he often uses his family members as models.
He's not afraid to tackle big themes, that's for sure!
Where did the Egyptians get the materials to make this dagger?
The materials used were from trade and local resources. Bronze is made from copper--likely imported from Cyprus--and tin--possibly imported from Anatolia. Ivory would have come from either a hippo or an elephant. Ebony was imported from Sub-Saharan Africa.
Why is this covered with sugar and molasses?
This is a resin replica of a piece that was originally made entirely out of sugar by Kara Walker for her installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn last summer. Brown sugar has been sprinkled on the resin to call back to the sculpture's original material. You may have read the wall text explaining that Walker's installation was a commentary on sugar as a commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries and the enslaved people who were the backbone of that industry.
That's cool! Thank you. Is there an image of the original sugar sculpture?
You can see an image on the wall by the elevators. There is a lot of text there too about the original installation and Walker's intent. Also, the website for the installation has a lot of great information, including her research resources and inspirations, the curatorial statement and process.
Is the arrow missing or was this sculpted without one?
The arrow has been lost over time.
"Diana of the Tower" is a variation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens's famous weathervane of the Roman goddess of the hunt that stood atop the Madison Square Garden Tower in New York City from 1894 until the Garden was demolished in 1925.
Were the needles so flimsy in the early days that you constantly needed new ones? Or why did this item needed a compartment for new needles?
The needles not only broke easily but they would often go missing or wear out so having a compartment for needles were necessary.
Although aluminum, in which this streamlined phonograph is encased, is taken for granted today as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications, it was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Hall, discovered an electrolytic process that made its commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple.
Isn't this bed a little short for an adult?
To be honest, although it may seem shorter, it is not considerably shorter than a modern bed! It may be the bed-hangings giving you that illusion.
May I please have more information on the waterspout shaped like a lion?
As you might have already read on the label, this spout would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall.
It's like a forerunner of the gargoyles that we see much later in French Gothic architecture on cathedrals like Notre Dame. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose. Felines of many kinds were closely associated with royalty (especially the pharaoh himself) and various deities in ancient Egyptian culture/religion. They were important symbolic guardians, just like the everyday cats that protected the Egyptians' granaries from mice!
Are the portraits in the Milligan parlor of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan?
Yes, in fact those portraits are of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan. What is so fascinating about this particular period room is that we have many of the original furnishings from the actual house in our collection.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.