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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I've always loved Florine Stettheimer's work. What are we seeing here?
"Heat" shows the five women of the Stettheimer family. Mother Rosetta appears at the top in a black dress, and she’s accompanied by her four daughters: Stella (also in black), Carrie (in yellow), Ettie (in flowered pink) and Florine herself (in white). All five women look like they're drooping from the heat, and so are the branches of the willow trees behind them and the cherry blossoms in a vase on the table. Stettheimer painted "Heat" to commemorate the summer of 1918, which the family spent at a rented country house in Bedford Hills, New York. Although she was inspired by a specific date and occasion—her mother’s birthday, as noted on the cake at the bottom!—time and place are ambiguous in this scene. The Stettheimer sisters appear ageless, or at least much younger than they really were in 1918.
Stettheimer spent much of her early life traveling and studying art in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Switzerland, but she and her sisters and mother came back to New York after World War I and settled permanently in Manhattan. She also designed theatrical stage sets and wrote poetry. However, she rarely exhibited her art during her life time, and since she was independently wealthy, she was free to practice her art without the financial concern of selling it as an income.
What can you tell me about this piece by Titus Kaphar?
That's a really powerful piece, he uses a really interesting mix of materials such as gold leaf and tar. I think the mixing of this one very expensive and one very cheap material alludes to the meaning of this series.
The label says it's about men who shared a name with his father and the common history of prison.
I think that the tar symbolizes the time these men spent in prison: this heavy, suffocating, dark, coating material covers their lives. However, the gold leaf sparkles on top, showing the humanity and resilience of the people who endure incarceration. The gold leaf also references religious iconography. Jerome also was the name of St. Jerome, the man who translated the Bible into Latin.
I know the show is called "I See Myself in You," I guess there's the identity of black men wrapped up in the prison system. And a shared identity of fathers and sons. Maybe the show is about identities being shared between people?
Definitely, I'm glad you're finding a thematic thread through the curation. I like that many of the pieces in this show are a little harder to decipher as "portraits" or reflections of identity. It requires us to really think through our associations.
They say everything an artist makes is a self portrait, right? Even if it's not a traditional self-portrait, a work of art reveals something about the maker.
Absolutely! Artists' works are a reflection of their own lived experiences and beliefs.
I don't see a hole underneath the chin for water to flow, did the water pour over the head and face?
The large pour spout is under the lower jaw. It would have been positioned on a temple roof or wall. In addition to channeling the rainwater down off the roof, the lion served a protective purpose.
Hegarty based this work on a painting by the nineteenth-century American artist Albert Bierstadt, who was famous for his large-scale depictions of the American West. You can see one of his paintings to your right. All the art in this room encourages us to look at and/or think about landscape in a new way. Hegarty is thinking about gradual changes (and potential destruction) of the American landscape, as well as the decline of a traditional way of showing landscapes in art.
Fascinating, thank you!
You're welcome!
What does the head piece that the male is wearing symbolize?
He is wearing a wig, which was common for men in ancient Egypt. Many people kept their heads shaved and wore wigs made of human hair and/or animal hair. In that hot climate, it was more comfortable to have a shaved head and the option of removing the wig.
Also, why does the sidelock and finger in the mouth indicate a young child?
The gesture of the child is often used for children, we think that's so because it's something that children naturally do.
Is it common for the woman to hold onto the mans leg in these times?
Not always but it's an interesting detail, right? This gesture was common in Old Kingdom family group statues. The label mentions that gesture as one of love and support. However, there are other works in the galleries that show the woman and the man on a more equal scale . You'll even see one sculpture, in the central gallery, where the husband and wife sit side by side with their arms around each others' shoulders.
Why did he become king so young? And why are they both looking straight ahead?
His father died, and his older half-brother reigned, but then he died, too. So Pepy II began to reign at a young age, but his mother was "regent," the adult appointed to reign in his place until he grew up.
What is the hole in the mothers head?
The queen wears a headdress decorated with the pattern of a vulture with outspread wings. Originally, the vulture's head would have been attached at that point. It may have even been made of gold!
Do the eyes mean anything?
The eyes are somewhat large and exaggerated, which was a stylistic trait of art in this era.
And is there anything I need to know about the writing on the foot piece?
Yes, that inscription at Pepy's feet reads: "King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pepy II, beloved of the god Khnum, given all life, like Re, forever." At Ankhnesmeryre's feet it read: "Mother of the king of Upper and Lower Egypt, daughter of the god, revered one, beloved of Khnum, Ankhnesmeryre"
Are these sorts of still life paintings just a display of skill, or are they supposed to mean something more?
They are actually both! They express or advertise the artist's skills, but still lifes also traditionally have overtones of the ephemerality of life.
The luxuries depicted here are beautiful but the fruit would go bad very quickly. See if you can spot any signs that any of it is past its prime.
Hi, I'm looking at this Block statue of Hor (57.66). I understand that these types of sculptures were used by private dedicators in temples, but do we know the social status of the person depicted here (Hor)?
Also, it appears that the figure is holding an object in its right hand. Is there any ideas on what that object is? And is there evidence that the object was ever painted?
We don't have much information about this specific block statue but we do know that Hor held several high, priestly titles like "God's Father" and "Scribe in the Temple of Amun." A block statue shows a nonroyal figure—almost always male—sitting on the ground with knees up and arms folded.
So would it be safe to say that he was certainly not the status of a Pharaoh, perhaps lending to the block statue form. But important enough to commission a work in black granite.
Yes, you are correct.
I really like this painting. Can you tell me anything else about the artist?
The artist was Ukrainian and died recently. Soviet Realism, art made in the republics and states under the influence of the Soviet Union from the 1950 through c.1990, is only beginning to be studied in the United States and information on individual artists that may have been well known in Russia is still limited here.
Interestingly, this work is on long term loan to the Museum from the collection of Jurii Maniichuk and Rose Brady, who collected close to 150 Ukrainian paintings of the Soviet era while living and working in Kyiv in the 1990s.
Thank you so much for the information, it's great to know that she's female, too!
You're welcome! Female artists actually had great opportunity in the arts under the Soviet system thanks to the policy that allowed them equal entry to art school and academies.
This object comes from a very interesting place and time, when the Southwest was Spanish.
At the time, churches were being decorated with work by native craftspeople rather than with European imports. So this was crafted with indigenous pine wood and local leather.
One aspect of this work that I really love is the unconventional imagery: it's almost as if Christ is standing on top of the Sacred Heart. Aragon did not have training in Academic conventions, so he was very inventive with how he was using Biblical imagery.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.