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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until spring 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Saul Restaurant + Bar
We're delighted to welcome Brooklyn's acclaimed Saul restaurant and bar into the Museum, brought to you by Chef Saul Bolton. Saul offers lunch, brunch, dinner, and tasting menus, complemented by an impressive wine list. Children are welcome. For more information and reservations, call 718.501.6462 or visit Saul's website.

The Counter
Stop by The Counter café for a casual brunch or lunch, with fare overseen by Chef Bolton. We offer freshly prepared sandwiches, salads, sweets, and daily specials, which you can enjoy at the café or to go. The Counter also serves wine and local beer.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Stop by the BKM Café or BKM Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group. (Saul is temporarily closed to bring you an exciting new Brooklyn dining experience.)

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (Saul is temporarily closed. Stop by our BKM Café and Bowl.)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this?
That is "The Awakening" by Maurice Sterne, dating from 1926.
The awakening from what or to what?
Sterne lived a bohemian life in Paris, where he first saw the art of Cézanne and other French modernists at the Salons d’Automne. He then traveled through Europe, to India and the Far East, and returned to New York in 1915.
He may have made this sculpture in response to the end of World War I, so it could be interpreted as waking up from the horrors of the War. Writers at the time also suggested it was in reference to the awakening of the modern woman.
Why does there seem to be a halo around the figures?
As the label might already explain, this is a fragment of a larger work originally titled "In the Park." After this piece was cut away from the original work, it was re-cut into an oval.  
Then those "spandrels" (triangular additions to the corners) were cut from another piece of canvas and added later. Weir painted them to fill out the composition into a rectangle again!  He matched the colors on the spandrels to the colors resulting from the dark varnish that was on the original composition. Because the varnish was later removed, we're left with a lighter oval center. Complicated, right?
Makes sense but yes, complicated!
Wow!
That work was a collaboration between a husband-and-wife team of artists, Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtova. They are from the Czech Republic, a place with a long, rich history of glass art. I'm glad you're here on a sunny day so that you can see it naturally lit!
Who is Lois Martin?
She was a research associate here at the Brooklyn Museum, working on the "Paracas textile" in the early 1990s.
She specialized in pre-Columbian art. She's not on the staff currently, but we're certainly still using her research, as you can see!
Can you tell me more about the artist who painted The Root?
Lynette Yiadon-Boakye was born in London in 1977 and she attended St Martins School of Art and Design and the Royal Academy Schools in London. She usually paints figures, and her influences include Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, and the British artist Walter Sickert. Here's an interesting quote from Yiadom-Boakye: “People are tempted to politicize the fact that I paint black figures, and the complexity of this is an essential part of the work. But my starting point is always the language of painting itself and how that relates to the subject matter.”
Thanks!
You're welcome!
How many ounces do these glasses hold? What drink were they probably used for?
Those were designed by Elsa Tennhardt and were used for mixed drinks and cocktails. I'm not sure how many ounces they might hold, but they are certainly smaller than modern-day martini glasses! The idea of mixing alcohols into a cocktail was new in the 20th century.
Why is he pointing at the ground?
I believe it's just the way he is holding his sword, which is a ceremonial sword, more for symbolism and status than for actual use.
His right hand does have a specific meaning though, it's an "oratorical" gesture, showing that he is about to speak. In fact, many of the objects in that portrait are symbolic and have meanings related to Washington's career and accomplishments!
Are the colors on the paper original or are they rewritten with colors believed to be used back then?
The colors are original, with red being used for the titles of spells.
Amazing, thank you!
You're welcome!
I'm looking at a pile of clothes with a vaguely feminine form. What makes these found object arrangements museum quality?
Thoughtful question. With this work, as with many, many contemporary works that utilize found objects and materials, it is really the intent and the idea of the artist that makes them of interest to collectors and museums.
The artist, Shinique Smith, was inspired by a film that tracks a T-shirt with a university logo from a thrift shop in New York to a mountain village in Africa, where it is purchased by a man and becomes his second shirt. Her piece really comments on the global economy through the path of second hand clothing. The title "Mitumba" is a Swahili word that literally means “bundles” and refers to the packages and articles of used clothing donated by people in prosperous countries to charitable causes. Smith has a series of sculptures like this.
Ok, I see that. Is the Santa Claus an original part of it?
Yes, her bundles include fabric scraps, clothing and toys and it was a complete piece when it was gifted to the Museum in 2009.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
I'm going to be volunteering here soon and I need to learn more about the collections. How many mummies are here? Is the mummy still in Nespanetjerenpere's container?
Their are four mummies on view. "Mummy and Cartonnage of Hor," "Anthropoid Coffin of Thothirdes," "Inner Cartonnage of Gautsesheni," and "Cartonnage and Mummy." Nespanetjerenpere's cartonnage is empty, the mummy has been lost.
Hor and Gautsesheni are inside of their cartonnages so you can't actually see the mummies themselves, but those two are in there. You can see Thothirdes and one more unnamed mummy. Those would be the two the kids are really after!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.