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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
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ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

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Here's what people are asking.

I really like this painting - is there any special inspiration behind the subject?
This work is part of a whole series of night scenes painted by the artist of things she saw out the window of her Times Square painting studio.
That's interesting, thanks!
This painting reminds me of works by Gauguin, do you know if this artist was inspired him?
You may have read this on the label, but Bob Thompson was a noted African American artist who studied at the University of Louisville and at Boston University. In the early and mid-1960s, he traveled throughout Europe and experienced many Renaissance paintings and other artworks firsthand.Thompson was definitely aware of Gauguin. He borrowed freely from Gauguin, Goya, and others.(He often based his compositions on those of his predecessors.)
Can you tell me why these two art works were paired to be shown next to each other?
That's a great question, our curators have teamed up to combine fine arts (painting, sculpture) with decorative arts (furniture, household objects) in the galleries. These two works are close in date, the Manship sculpture is 1924, and the Frankl piece is late 1920s. They are both associated with the Art Deco, or Art Moderne, movement and they use streamlined forms and fine materials.
That makes sense because even though they look really different they sort of feel similar. Thanks!
The Frankl piece is inspired by 1920s skyscraper architecture, and Manship was looking back to ancient Greek sculpture but they were both interested in smooth contours and surfaces.
How did this advertising piece end up in the collection?
The artist, Lewis Simon, sold this piece to a dealer named Ivan Karp in 1961. This was purchased by this museum in 1974 from a gallery. This was a time when American museums were interested in collecting American "folk art" and even showing it alongside "fine art" by traditionally trained artists. 
I have a question about this because I didn't fully understand the artist's quote in the description that explained the art historical reference. It says: "the chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house , the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof..."
That is a somewhat mysterious quote! The forms of the chair's back do resemble a ladder, that's true. A "caryatid" is an architectural column shaped like a human figure. They were used in classical Greek temples, for example.
However, ancient Greek architecture is always centralized and harmoniously proportioned, but this work is very "modern" in being so awkwardly placed. Everything is off-center, and I'm guessing that was likely the artist's intention -- to make us feel a little uneasy.
Could you provide more explanation about the light in this painting?
Yes, the light in this painting is very striking, and quite dramatic and done very deliberately. The artist idealizes the female laborers in warm sunlight, in front of a glowing background. By casting the figures and the landscape in this light Breton presents an idyllic vision of both the women farm workers and rural life. This is typical of much of Breton's work, who was particularly known for this type of image - poetic rendering of peasant female figures situated within a landscape.
Breton visited the outskirts of Paris to get inspiration for his rural subject matter, which was made popular by avant-garde Realist painters in the mid-to-late 19th century. Breton, however, was trained at the Academy of Fine Arts at Ghent. His works are more refined than the rough painterly style of Realists and his subjects more idealized. Also, unlike the Barbizon School painters who painted landscapes outdoors, Breton painted his rural landscapes indoors in his studio. Like the Barbizon painters, however, he embraced the French landscape as subject matter. Traditionally, landscape painting was considered less important than history or allegorical paintings. 
It's beautiful!
So glad you like it! It is stunning the way that he uses light. I like to compare the way that he uses light with the way that Monet is using light in his paintings that are hanging on the same wall. Have you seen those yet?
The contrast between the light and the women gives it a more profound feel. I am going to go and see the Monet.
I definitely agree about creating a deeper effect around the women and how we interpret them. The way you phrased it made me look more closely - thanks! Enjoy the Monet.
This painting is haunting and also slightly off putting. Can you tell us more about the artist's intent?
There's definitely something surreal about this scene -- it isn't meant to look "real." Instead, the artist is thinking about emotional bonds and complex interactions between individuals. He has often spoken about the fear that comes with new parenthood -- taking on a new role in life. His wife modeled for the female figure; he has included her, and himself, in many of his works. We have this wonderful quote from the artist: "This painting portrays birth as a moment where one is pulled from one form of existence into another. I was thinking about the day when my son came home from the hospital, and the complex nature of these first interactions, the powerful and strange dynamic with this new human - both intimate and completely foreign."
Could you tell me why this sculpture has not been on display for about 80 years? Anything special about this one?
The piece wasn't displayed for so long because it was in very poor condition and needed conservation work that the curators had to save up for. It is also interesting because it originally held a cat mummy but is in a different shape. And, the fact that it is wood (which was rare in Ancient Egypt) makes it valuable as well. It is amazing that wood pieces like this and some of the mummy boards you see throughout the galleries survived since they are so much more perishable than stone.
Totally agreed, thanks. Also, please send the highest respect to the people who fixed this piece. They have done an outstanding job!
I will! We have a whole in-house conservation department that is amazing with specialists in everything from just paper or just paintings to stone and enamels, which makes us very lucky as a museum.
This piece reminds me of Yayoi Kusama!
I can definitely see that! Although that piece is Italian, the dots are definitely a connection. We in fact have a few Yayoi Kusamas paintings, but none of them are currently on view.
That's sad!
I can definitely tell this piece was influenced by Andy Warhol, however, Kass made this one. How can we tell if it is a copy or just get influenced by Warhol?
Kass is inserting herself into iconic works from art history, so she is definitely referencing Warhol, but in a way that asserts her identity as a female artist into the Pop art reference.
Okay, I see. As an art history student, I was confused by these copy and reference issues. I'm glad to hear some opinions from professionals!
Oh, I see!
I intend to hear opinions from different people.
We like hearing your opinions too!
Well, so far this is the best $10 I've spent in the U.S. The exhibitions, galleries, and collections are amazing!
That makes us so happy! I'm glad you like the collections (and you have visited quite a few different galleries). 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.