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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me a bit about these two chairs?
The goal of this installation is to showcase how European conceptions of chair have influenced and are influenced by African and non-Western seat design. As well as the cross cultural importance implied by sitting in a chair. Often times you'll see only the most important person in a room gets to sit in a chair --  to the left you'll see an American example and to the right you'll see an Asante example. 
For the Asante , chairs and stools play a key role in stately regalia. Based on European furniture forms this type of chair represents the stability and commitment of a chief or king. The two finials on the top rear of the char are thought to represent an eagle’s talons and further reference to power of the seated individual.  I personally love the highly ornamental use of the brass tacks. Kings and court officials had to sit in a highly prescribed symmetrical pose to embody stately grace and composure.
As you may have read on the label the American Wainscot Chair was intended for the most important person in the house -- and also took comfort second to the appearance of power and grace. 
What is this?
You may have read on the label that this mask would be used in Yaka circumcision and initiation rituals. After the boys are initiated as men, they travel through numerous villages and are presented as adults. This mask was crucial in these presentations however, it wouldn't be worn. Instead it would actually be held by with a stick . The stick on this particular mask is hidden by the rafia.
Is this Muhammad Ali? 
This iconic image of Muhammad Ali was by Flip Schulke!  While on assignment to photograph the young Ali, Schulke mentioned, in passing, that he specialized in underwater photography. Ali — wanting to do something special to get into LIFE magazine told the photographer that he worked out every day in the water; that an old trainer had told him that water resistance would add strength to his arms and quickness to his punches. Truthfully he never trained underwater and couldn’t even swim! Sure enough the two produced this iconic image together along with many other and they ran in LIFE’s September 8, 1961, issue.
Can you tell me about this?
My favorite thing about Frakes' photo of the NCAA finals is the perfect timing: for a brief moment, the camera overlaid the bodies of two players -- UCSB's #10 and UofC's #22 as they flew through the air.
Despite our knowledge of gravity, both women seem to be flying upwards, not downwards. To a large degree, Frakes accomplishes this by placing the camera almost on the ground and tilting it slightly
Instant replay please!
In this photograph, we get to see football (soccer) as it was long before the advent of the amount of padding and helmets we see today! The photograph is by Martin Munkàsci, who specialized in photographing people in motion, from athletes to fashion models
Who is number 31?
#31 would be Shane Battier for Duke. 2001 would be his last season as a collegiate athlete and he would go on to remain #31 for several NBA teams until his retirement in 2014. 
How did they discover this?
Many pieces from Benin were acquired by colonial powers, so Britain or France. In later times, people would often travel to collect objects for Museums or to sell in European art markets. After leaving Nigeria this work first belonged to a Doctor in London (from 1897-98) and eventually made its way to the Brooklyn Museum in 1958.
The Edo, who currently live in Nigeria and Benin, trace their ancestry to the Kingdom of Benin, which was a powerful state back during the 15th and 16th century.
Was there resistance from the local communities about this?
In some cases. Many objects did leave after Europeans started their colonies. In other cases, things would be sold by the communities if they were no longer of use.
Tell me about this!
This photograph by Hy Peskin shows the boxer Carmen Basilio. Basilio may be best-known for his defeat of Sugar Ray Robinson, in 1958, two years after this photograph.
I just love how, despite this photograph's title being focused on Basilio's victory, he is actually in the background of the photograph. In the foreground we instead see the defeated Tony DeMarco, the previous Welterweight Champion. There's such a great amount of visual and metaphorical tension between to two figures -- one victorious the other defeated. 
I agree! How many rounds did he last?
DeMarco lasted12 rounds! Basilio won by a KO in the 12th round. Pretty dramatic!
How about this photo?
This is another great photo by Hy Peskin, a pioneer of modern sports photography. 
Jim Taylor (running with the football) was a fullback for the Packers, who were the NFL champions for that year (1962). There's a real sense of anticipation in this one. Will the the player rushing towards us overtake Taylor?
What attracted you to this one?
It's my dad's.
Do you mean the phone you're using is your dad's? Or does your dad own a copy of that last photo you sent me???
My dad is Hy Peskin.
WOW! Well you must know more about these photographs than I do!
Awesome dancelike photo, are there others by Manny Millan in the collection?
That's the only one!
And, how were these photos chosen and by whom?
The exhibition was chosen by Gail Buckland, who returns as guest curator after the 2009 exhibition "Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History."
She grouped them thematically as aesthetic objects, not necessarily keeping depictions of the same sport in one grouping.
Fantastic exhibit! Thanks!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.