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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this piece by Ganzeer about?
It combines motifs that the artist has used over the course of several years, up to late 2015. He usually distributes his art as stickers, stencils, and prints.
He likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. He says that he feels like a "bicycle chain" -- “We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
How was it actually applied to the wall? Was it painted here?
It is one large vinyl image with several digital prints layered on top. It was installed here by in-housestaff (the artist was not present) and the Museum's conservation team was very involved in the process.
Hi there! Welcome to "This Place." How are you liking the exhibition so far?
Josef Koudelka's contribution to the project focuses on the wall that divides the region. He says, referring to the Berlin Wall, "You know, I grew up in Czechoslovakia, behind a wall. I always wanted to get to the other side. I know what a wall is about."
Yes, but who painted it and what is "this place"? It's not just a wall, it's an abandoned building.
It is actually a large-print photograph, not a painting. If you look closely, you will see the wall out of the window on the right and the hole in the wall on the left.
"This Place" refers to Israel and the West Bank, the region that all of the work in the show focuses on.
Throughout this series of photographs, Koudelka photographed the many different components that make up the wall: the razor wire, the checkpoints, access roads, etc.
I know it's a photograph, but what is the painting on the wall in the photo?
Oh, I see, sorry I misunderstood! This image depicts a Crusader map mural painted on the walls of a building in Kalia Junction, near the Dead Sea. The structure dates from either the British Mandate period (1923-1948) or later Jordanian era (1948-1967).
Hi! I am in the "This Place" exhibit. Is there a site where I can read a description about each of the photos?
Hi there, so happy you're checking out our new exhibition! While the official website of the project does not describe every photo you will see (there are over 600 in the exhibition!), you can definitely check it out for much more info on each photographer and their individual project: http://www.this-place.org/
Of course, you can also send us a question about what you see! We are happy to help!
Thanks Megan! I was looking for descriptions about each piece, but thank you!
Unfortunately, I don't think each, individual piece is described anywhere! My best recommendation would be to read the artist's statements about their projects and then to decipher the photos from there--knowing what the photographer's goal was really helps to unpack the photographs, I think.
Thanks!
Of course---enjoy and let us know if you have questions!
What were the materials & tools used for this?
This head is made of greywacke, a type of schist. The tools likely would have metal, likely bronze, and polishing was done by rubbing granulated stone.
What's this?
You're looking at "Donation Stela with a Curse" from the Third Intermediate Period. A stela (stelae, plural) is just a standing slab, usually with carved relief or inscriptions on it. In the Egyptian culture, as in most cultures, stelae usually had commemorative or funerary purposes.
As you may have read on the label it is a representation of the Libyan chieftain Hornakht accompanied by the flute player Ankh-hor-pa-khered, making donation of a field of 10 acres to Harpocrates, a representation of Horus as a child.
What is this scene?
That's a photograph by Thomas Struth. It depicts the West Bank city of Hebron, a place with a politically complex history.
Hebron is the largest city in the West Bank, and as of 1997, the city has been split into two sectors Israeli and Palestinian. The Palestinian population in H2 (under control of the Palestinian Authority; H1 is under Israeli control) has greatly declined due to the impact of Israeli security measures which include extended curfews, strict restrictions on movement, and general harassment. Palestinians are barred from using Al-Shuhada Street, which is a major road in the city.
How would you say that changed the way you view Shore's work? It certainly changed the way I see the images he took.
The question I would ask back is WHY were they banned? Two stories. No?
You're certainly right, there are two sides to that issue. Shore may not be overtly political, but by depicting the tangled, tense streets of Hebron, he is inviting us to consider the political realities, not to ignore them.
Huh?
What I mean to say is the artist isn't taking a stance in that issue, just presenting the city. We are the ones tasked with appreciating the aesthetics of the images, while trying to reconcile the political issues.
Which I found refreshing!
I'm glad you appreciated it! I loved the subtlety as well.
Quick question, what are these and what are they for?
You might notice that those are the only non-photograph works in the show! They're from Nick Waplington.
These are disused water tanks or water heaters. Waplington says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For him, these everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Waplington took them to a Palestinian auto-body shop in the refugee camp of Abu Dis in the West Bank just outside Jerusalem and asked the workers there to make them look like race cars. Auto racing is a shared passion in the region! In this way, the tanks have been repurposed into works of art. They're pieces with complex, shifting histories, just like the region itself.
Thanks a lot!
You're welcome! 
What's the meaning behind this photo?
Great question! The artist Martin Kollar doesn't try to pin down meaning in his works. He was granted access to medical research sites and animal research facilities, military practice areas and other places with restricted access. It looks like some kind of study on the animal's digestion is being done here. It's awfully surreal and disturbing if you ask me!
Same here!
How about these? Can you explain?
Those are painted water heater tanks by Nick Waplington. He says he found them at dumps outside the settlements, where Palestinian children play and the adults look for useful things. For the artist, these functional, everyday objects were a symbol of the entire Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
"The settlers," he says, "who are better-off economically, discard their broken things. The Palestinians, for their part, often have to recycle them and repurpose them." The settlers "heat the water in their homes using the heaters," he continues. "The Palestinians make ovens out of them. The Bedouin use them as a drinking trough for their sheep. Others turn them into barbecues. Soldiers told me there are also Palestinians who fill them with explosives and make anti-tank devices from them."
What is a cone and what does it do?
Scholars aren't completely sure what the cone is, but it greatly resembles a pinecone. In Assyrian art, the basket and cone almost always appear in the hands of supernatural creatures rather than humans, suggesting that these objects may have served a magical purpose. Assyrian texts refer to the basket and cone carried by the genies in many of these reliefs as a "bucket" and "purifier." This terminology may indicate that in addition to serving to pollinate the sacred tree many of the figures on these reliefs hold buckets or "sacred pails" which were thought to contain holy water, used to sprinkle and purify the king and the Sacred Tree using symbolic fir cones.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.