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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
Is this Snoopy?
That piece is titled "Should I Be Attacking" and it's by KAWS, the same artist who created the large wooden sculpture on view in the lobby. 
That's a great question! KAWS often alludes to familiar cartoon characters in his works but changes aspects about them. Here you do see Snoopy looking much different than in the original cartoons!
If you go around the corner to the left from "Should I Be Attacking," you will see another KAWS painting that uses a popular cartoon character. See if you can figure out who it is!
How is this playing by itself?
Great question! The work uses as MIDI player piano system which allows the keys to move and the music you hear comes from a recording. It's a song titled "Strange Fruit," popularized in the 1930s by the jazz vocalist Billie Holiday.The arrangement of the song twas done by the artist himself (Sanford Biggers).  It laments and protests the lynching of African-Americans.
This room is furnished in the, "Aesthetic Movement Style." This describes "a Western style based on the architecture and decorative arts of the Muslim inhabitants (the Moors) of north-west Africa and (between 8th and 15th centuries) of southern Spain; it is often used imprecisely to include Arab and Indian influences." Studies of Moorish art and architecture began around 1815 and focused on the design and color patterns. The Moorish style was reserved for masculine spaces such as billiards and smoking rooms as well as halls. Style characteristics include arches, patterned walls and fabrics, dark woodwork and tasseled and fringed chairs. The style evoked the romantic, "imaginary, dreamlike Orient," and was attractive to artists, writers and travelers. The style was popular in the West for the person seeking an eclectic design style. Interior architectural materials in United States interpretations of Moorish spaces particularly would include stone, brick or wood. The style fell out of fashion by the early twentieth century. 
The mask is unique! It would be worn on the back of a dancer during potlatch ceremonies and the dancer would be able to move the mouth and flippers to imitate the movements of a baleen whale.
Any information on George Bradford Brainerd? His photographs are wonderful.
George Brainerd, a lifelong Brooklynite, produced a total of 2,500 photographs before his early death at age 42 in 1887.
The majority of these were images of Brooklyn, a vast documentation of the urban landscape. He photographed dams and mills, bridges and train depots, engine houses and pumping stations -- but also, especially after 1880, city dwellers and street scenes.
If you're local, and you're interested in images of Coney Island -- an entire show of Coney Island-themed art will be opening here in November. A while away, I know. ;)
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.