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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What can you tell me about these butter dishes?
These were created in the United States in 1880 and they are made of a material called "milk glass."
The dish at the center of your image shows the figure of Uncle Sam sitting atop the Battleship Maine and is a souvenir of the Spanish American War (Uncle Sam actually serves as the handle for removing the top). This may be representative of the push towards patriotism that was being felt in the United States during this time period. The other dish has a portrait bust of Admiral Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy during the Civil War and the only man to hold that title. He sits atop a US shop and it actually says his last name 'DEWEY,' below his bust.
What species of bird is shown on the top of this chest?
The species depicted there is a falcon. This bird was the animal representation of the Egyptian god Sokar, a form of the sun-god sometimes combined with Osiris, god of the dead.
Can you tell me more about Arabella Duval Yarrington Worsham? She has the Moorish Room preserved here in Brooklyn, and a pendant room in the Virginia museum of Fine Art, but how could she afford so much?
Arabella became a resident of New York City after the Civil War. Before she moved, it is suspected she had an illegitimate child by a man named John A. Worsham, whose last name she took. She was married multiple times and one of her marriages was to the railroad tycoon Collis Huntington (who may also be the father of her son, it is not certain).
Through her marriage to Huntington, she was able to purchase the home on West 54th street, where this room comes from, and lived comfortably and fashionably.
Was she wealthy before the war? She was a wealthy Virginian who fled to the North when the war broke out, correct?
Not much is known about her before the war. In fact, she would tell people different years that she was born so no one knows when she was really born, and it is not truly known if she is actually from Virginia (although this is widely accepted).
Why is this cat wearing earrings? Did Egyptians pierce their cat's ears?
Cat statues like this one often wear earrings, nose-rings, necklaces, and collars. It is likely that the ancient Egyptians actually pierced their cats' ears. Some tomb paintings and hieroglyphs depict cats wearing such jewelry.
It says that is the "Sun God;" what sun god is it and what does that mean?
Shamash was an originally Mesopotamian deity and the Sun god in the Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Canaanite pantheons. Both in early and in late inscriptions, Shamash is designated as the "offspring of Nannar" (the Moon-god). It is in relationship, presumably, to the Moon-god that the Sun-god appears as the dependent power.
Since Shamash could see everything on Earth, he also represented the god of justice. That is why Shamash is depicted as a ruler seated on a throne. Every morning, the gates in the East open up, and Shamash appears. He travels across the sky, and enters the gate in the West. He travels through the Underworld at night in order to begin in the East the next day. In Babylon, located in the south of Mesopotamia, the symbol of Shamash was the solar disk, with a four-pointed star inside it.
We are looking at Serapis. Could you tell us more about this statue?
You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). Worship of Serapis continued in the Roman period and eventually spread to Europe. 
This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Marcel Breuer was the first designer to develop tubular steel furniture. This kind of furniture was meant to be functional, comfortable, and lightweight all at once. Breuer started working on these designs when he was teaching at the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany.
With the Gerrit Dou portrait/self portrait, I'm curious why the portrait has not been displayed in public since 1946? 
The painting was acquired in 1932, but for many years it was believed to have been a copy of a Dou painting made by a lesser-known artist. In 2011, it was conclusively attributed to Dou, which gave it greater historical value and made it much more interesting for display.
Were these weapons ceremonial, or functional?
It is likely that this was a ceremonial blade due to the high artistic quality of the object. Both ceremonial and functional objects like this would be placed in the tomb of the deceased for use in the afterlife.
Do you know who the couple was and what they did?
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weil were a Jewish couple who lived on Park Ave in an apartment that housed the room you see in the Museum today. The Weil family was and still is a prominent banking family.
After Mr. Weil passed, Mrs. re-married a man by the name of Raymond Worgelt, who donated the room to the Museum in 1970.
Alavoine was the firm that the Weil's hired to decorate the room. The firm manufactured furniture and woodwork out of offices in NY and Paris.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.