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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
Where did the museum find this jewelry and how many people do you think wore them?
Like much of the finest ancient art, this jewelry likely comes from a Sumerian tomb. Pieces like these made of such precious materials would have belonged to elite--even royal--members of society. We don't know how many hands they may have passed through before being buried though.
It says on the description that it is the 'Torso of Akhenaten.' Who was he and what did he do?
Akhenaten was a pharaoh called, by some modern Egyptologists, the heretical king. He reigned during the 18th Dynasty and was the son and successor of Amunhotep III who you may have seen in other galleries. Akhenaten restructured the entire Ancient Egyptian religion around a single solar deity: the Aten. The capital city was moved to Akhetaten or modern Tell el-Amarna which is why Akhenaten's reign is referred to as the Amarna period.
Akhenaten's religion and very existence was rejected after his death which is why you see the cartouches chiseled off of this bust.
Where is this?
This is the former Palace Hotel on Agron Street in Jerusalem, now the Waldorf-Astoria, and Frederic Brenner is the photographer.
Brenner wanted to capture the idea of identity and place and how one thing affects the other. He also initiated the project for "This Place" and invited these other photographers to collaborate on the project.
Brenner said that the ruins of the Palace Hotel represented to him "the real gifts of life for those who dare to adventure beyond the narrow pattern of the known and I believe that as much as we act, we are being acted upon and as much as we choose, we are being chosen."
The label on this said this was worn on a belt? How did they wear it if it was so heavy?
Great question! Palmas, like this one, were intended to represent similar items that were attached to the belts of ball-players during the game. The stone versions served ceremonial purposes.
This piece emulates actual palm branches that were attached to the belts of ball-players in Mesoamerican cultures.
The abstract curls carved into the stone possibly symbolized flowing blood. Blood has connotations of sacrifice. The ballgame in Mesoamerica was played for both recreational and ceremonial purposes. Other ceremonial ballgame accessories include iconography of death as well.
Cool!
Indeed!
Who made this?
This is a Reclining Jaguar from the Aztec culture in current day Mexico. As you may have read on the label Jaguars held special significance in Aztec culture, representing power and might (not too far of a stretch given how powerful and dangerous these animals are). Often Jaguars were associated with warriors and rulers. This sculpture may have been placed in a temple, palace, or the home of an elite family. Due to the jaguar imagery, it may have adorned a military academy where warriors were trained.
The Aztecs have a hugely complex society and many people are familiar with their step pyramids, impressive gold jewelry and elaborate and beautiful frescos. One interesting fact is that despite their skilled metal working techniques, due to the rarity of copper in the region the majority of stone cutting was done with flint tools. These amazing details and sumptuous forms are even more impressive when you realize the difficulty of the process!
What am I looking at?
You're looking at the mummy of Thothirdes. His coffin is shown in a nearby case. As you can see, the body is covered in many shrouds of linen, and would then have been placed in the wooden coffin. The process of mummifying the body was incredibly elaborate, and involved many religious rituals during the embalming process. This was to ensure the protection of both the body and the soul of the person as they made the long and difficult journey through the afterlife.
There are currently four mummies in the galleries: Thothrides, Hor, Gautseshenu, and the Anonymous Man. Let me know if you'd like any more information about the mummification process or any of the mummies on view.
Before becoming mummies, most of them were important people?
Important might not be the right word, wealthy might be a better term. Generally, royalty, the nobility or the very wealthy could afford lavish and highly decorative funerary rites. Thothirdes, for example, was a priest.
Hi! I see that the film "Misery and the Fortune of Women" was commissioned by a producer, and I was wondering: was this an activist/passion project of his?
Hi there! That's a great question! The film was something of personal interest to the producer Lazar Wechsler and he looked to Soviet directors like Eisenstein and Tisse because abortion was already legal there.
I see! On the same film: I noticed that the couple very conspicuously aren't very intimate: they shake hands rather than kiss. Censorship/morality code?
I would guess (given some knowledge of Soviet customs) that it does have to do with some level of public decorum. 
Cool!! Really cool to see public health films about women's health that humanize abortion, so I wondered if there was a personal angle.
Turns out you were right on! I'm not sure exactly what his personal motivation was, but as a social goal he was working against the very unsafe abortion market in places where the procedure wasn't legal.
Very interesting!! Thank you :)
You're welcome! It looks like Wechsler produced a few films with political agendas and a number of documentaries later in his career.
The Book of the Dead, So amazing to have such an early writing survive in this condition. Where was it found?
It is pretty exciting! Thanks to the Egypt's dry arid climate many examples of papyrus and plant-based materials survive to this day. Pair that with  the Egyptian belief was that the dead needed all the things a living person needs (food, clothes, games etc.) there are a plethora of objects that were created but were never physically used. This copy of the Book of the Dead was reportedly found in Saqqara, which was the primary burial site near Memphis (now known as Cairo).
It would have belonged to (or it still belongs to) Sobekmose, who held the title "Goldworker of Amun;" which means he was a goldsmith, and he likely worked in a temple to the god Amun, the most prominent deity of the New Kingdom period.
Do we know what happened to the man in this photo?
Hi there! I can't seem to find a specific answer to your question, unfortunately. Frederic Brenner, the photographer, has spoken extensively about his work and the project but I have not found anywhere that he describes what happened to this subject, other than that this man was a victim of the conflict in the region. We're not sure whether he was an Israeli soldier or something else, but Brenner talks about people who are “sacrificed on the altar of ideology” in general.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.