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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I see that you are in Connecting Cultures. This innovative, cross-cultural installation was developed to create new ways of looking at art by making connections between cultures as well as objects.
Which objects does the one above relate to?
This tree and its unlocated companion panel, part of the decorative mosaics from an ancient synagogue, probably represented the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life, from the Garden of Eden and described in the biblical Book of Genesis. It is surrounded by other religious and spiritual objects: Buddhas, Yoruba masks, Kachina Dolls, etc., from around the world. See what connections you can draw between those objects!
I recognize this piece. What other museums is it located in?
You are very welcome! Great question. Gaston Lachaise made many large-scale sculptures of standing women. I know that The Metropolitan of Art, MoMA and the Whitney have similar works by Lachaise.
Got it. I knew it looked familiar!
Was this made at the Paris opera? Or done from Degas' memory?
The initial impulse for one of Degas's paintings was usually a scene or figure that he had actually observed—in this case, a pause in the rehearsal for the ballet "La Source," which opened at the Paris Opera on November 12, 1866. (This was not the Garnier Opera we think of today; it was still being built. Rather, Degas attended the Paris Opera on the rue Peletier.) However, he actually painted the picture back in his studio.The final work was the result of a complex, carefully planned process that drew on the sketches he made at the rehearsal and other sources.
Degas wrote of his process: "No art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the Old Masters—of inspiration, temperament, spontaneity... I know nothing."
Degas began work on the Portrait of Mlle Fiocre in the Ballet "La Source" in the summer of 1867 and had it ready for exhibition at the Salon in the spring of 1868. Following his academic training, he first made many preparatory studies of the individual parts of the picture before putting them together in a finished composition.
When was the Spacelander Bicycle built?
It was designed in 1946 and a prototype was made, but the Spacelander didn't go into production until 1960. Its molded fiberglass design was very innovative and was patented by the designer, Benjamin Bowden.
It was only manufactured for one year, with only about 500 models sold before Bomard Industries went bankrupt in 1961. It was available in five colors and this one was called "Stop Sign Red." It has faded over time!
What can you tell me about this chest?
That's a really interesting room, in general. It shows the ways that so many American artists and craftsmen were influenced by foreign cultures in their work at the turn of the last century.
The overall shape/form of this chest of drawers is European, but the materials are Asian-inspired: bamboo and woven cane. Americans had a particular interest in Japan in the later 1800s, after the US reopened trade with Japan in the 1850s and Japanese goods were imported in large quantities. You might also notice Asian influences in other objects in that gallery, like the folding mirror in a case to the left and the porcelain dishes nearby.
What is this?
It's a stained glass window dating to circa 1869, designed by Henry Sharp. Sharp was based in Manhattan and designed windows for churches up and down the East Coast.
What is this?
Everything in that case is made of materials that were innovative or unusual at the time! That armchair is made of cast iron and it incorporates a design of plant leaves. Can you see them? Behind it, you'll see a small table made from 42 animal horns!
I think I have an arm chair like that one at home!
The 1880s was a time of prosperity for the United States, and the expanding middle class and upper middle class were buying furniture for their newly built homes. Furniture manufacturers catered to this new market by coming up with surprising materials and new designs.
How will I know if it is authentic, from the time period?
If you were curious, you'd need to contact a professional appraiser who specializes in furniture.
Wow, thanks!
What is the significance of the text in red in the Book of the Dead vs the text in black?       
I see you're looking very closely at the Book of the Dead, red text signifies the title of a spell or similarly important words within the document.
This is cool!
Hello and thank you for using our app! I see you're looking at the formidable Speaker Figure. If you look closely, you can see the beautiful texture of the carving lines up the body made by the hand adze that was used, a detail the maker wanted to highlight. The Kwakwaka'wakw still perform ceremonies and celebrations with the figures and masks you see in this gallery.
Interesting, thank you.
Can you provide any history or background about this painting? I'm curious about what drove him to paint the spark in such dark background and some general background information would help, too.
The artist, Godfried Schalcken, worked in the Netherlands in the late-17th century, when there was a demand for intimately scaled scenes of everyday life from wealthy merchants and businessmen to in their families' homes. Between 1680 and 1690, however,  Schalcken won international fame, based, above all, on his subtle rendering of various kinds of natural and artificial light. He painted many scenes of figures blowing out candles or torches in dark interiors, but we aren't sure of the exact meaning behind that motif. His interest in artificial lighting came from his teacher, Gerrit Dou, who's self portrait you can see on this wall as well.
I see.
It did give him an opportunity to show his skill at representing light and shadow! I'm wondering whether he might have been aware of the earlier Italian painter Caravaggio who also explored effects of focused light in contrast with dark shadow.
There is a reflection of the fire in the boy's eye. Just one bright spot, it's gorgeous.
If you're curious about Northern Baroque painting, the Hals portrait of the man with the white ruff holding a small object in his hand is worth a look. He's holding a small painting, a portrait within a portrait! The trompe l'oeil ("fool the eye") effect of the oval "frame"-within-a-frame is also fascinating.
Thanks for your introduction.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.