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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I love the security this figure displays.
Yes! Do you get the meaning of the title? "Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses"?
I'm not sure. The spoon with molasses on it?
Yes! If the person she's talking to attempts to kiss her, he'll get a big hot spoon of molasses in his face.
Oh! I thought she had leftover molasses on her lips.
I'm sure the man in question would prefer that. Instead, he's getting a fair warning.
Haha. I love it!
This painting is by a female artist, as are many in this gallery. I like that it is a comment on portraiture in general. The subject refuses to be objectifed! It's as if she's saying, "Yes ,I'm a woman and I'm attractive, but I have more important things going on here."
Yeah exactly. Thanks for everything! It was fun chatting with you.
Is this "broken" detail a part of the work or was this piece damaged by many years and transportation?
This is actually a fairly recent piece (dated 1991-92). This "broken edge" effect is definitely a part of many of their glass works. If you ever see other pieces by them, it is likely you will see the same sort of edge.
What is this?
This is a "Double Kohl Tube with Applicator" and was used for makeup. Egyptian men and women alike wore dark black kohl, or eyeliner, both for fashion, and to protect their eyes from the sun.
What do the red, winged figures symbolize?
Those are Cherubim, which are very common in religious Renaissance paintings. They are a type of angel. They are usually depicted as cute, round faced angels with red wings. They are regarded in traditional Christian symbolism as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. But here they are depicted as winged heads. They were originally painted silver, but over time tarnishing has made them turn more reddish.
Do you see the circles behind their heads? What do they mean?
The golden circles represent halos and are used to show the divinity of the Madonna and the infant Christ. 
Thanks!
What are these pictures? I can't seem to find any information about them?
Oh fantastic, those are illustrations of the figures around the fringe of the Paracas Textile in this room, under the glass case.
Wow! They look so different in color!
These are hand-made, incredibly intricate figures, some human, some animal, some supernatural. You may see some of the figures in an illustration underneath, which shows how the back of the figure was also completed. It's mind-boggling to me how these pieces were made. We consider this piece to be one of the masterpieces of our collection. No other mantle of this type in the world is as large, intricate and preserved as well as this one.
What would it have been used for? Was it ceremonial?
Yes, most likely it was used as a ceremonial object. It was likely used as a funerary object. We don't know what its use was beforehand, but its small size (much smaller than mantles that were worn for everyday) and the complexity of the border figures suggest that it may have been used flat so the figures were more visible. It's so amazing to me that this is a 2000 year old object. I think we tend to understand history as an ever-evolving upward journey of innovation, but this handiwork, done thousands of years ago, proves how innovative, skilled and talented humans have been throughout time.
This may be a strange question, but if it was a ritual burial object, isn't it inappropriate for it to be separated from the body it was found with? I have this same feeling about the Egyptian mummies, it just feels sad.
Not at all a strange question. Excavations and archeological digs are handled much differently today than they were in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you can imagine, back in the early 1900s, mummy bodies from Egypt were unwrapped for entertainment at wealthy people's salon parties, and in earlier centuries (around 16th-17th) mummy remains were sold for medicinal purposes and for a paint pigment called "mummy brown". Humanity's ethical revolution is certainly a slow one.
Have there been attempts at any restoration or historically destroyed tombs?
No, archeologists do not try to restore tombs that have been destroyed. They try to preserve the historical context of the space and architecture as it is. It's an ethical issue, archeologists cannot be completely sure what the original tombs would look like, and their materials, tools and perceptions are different from what the original culture intended.
I can see why this is so complicated. Thanks so much for answering all my questions today. I had a great visit.
I'm so glad to hear that. Your inquiries were so thought provoking. Hope to hear from you again!
This reminds me of Max Beckmann what do you think?
Excellent comparison--I definitely see that! Beckmann painted a similar self-portrait in a tuxedo in 1927 (it's at the Harvard Art Museum). Although Beckmann was an Expressionist and Kees van Dongen here was inspired by the Fauves, the facial structure and use of color is definitely reminiscent of a Beckman.
Yes, it's the facial structure and colors! Thanks for educating on the nuances.
Of course, I love that it reminded you of a Beckmann, I've never seen that before but I certainly do now.
Hi, I'd like to know some more about this series of portraits.
You're looking at a Deborah Kass series of silkscreens. At first look many people assume it's a work by Andy Warhol. But Kass is a woman interested in interjecting herself into the mostly male art world.
I was just passing through on my way to the period rooms, but this caught my eye.
It's a pretty interesting exhibition on self-portraiture and identity. I know some people say, "Every work of art an artist makes is in a way a self portrait." Some of the works in this installation are easy to understand as a portrait, but others are much more abstract.
Why does everyone look so terrified? And who is the figure in the top right corner?
Early ethnic stereotypes animate this painting based on American author Washington Irving's raucous stores of life in colonial New York. In this scene from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," three money-mad characters hunt for treasure supposed to have been buried in a Dutch New York cemetery at the time of the British takeover.
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Doctor Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure climaxes when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
Oh, interesting! Thanks for the information!
What is in baby Jesus's hand? The Holy Spirit? It looks like a glass orb.
Yes you're right, the Christ child is holding a crystal orb. It is meant to symbolize that he is the "light of the world." I love how the delicate way the Madonna holds the Christ child in this picture actually mimics how he holds the fragile orb.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.