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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Do you have any guess on when this frog was created?
We have on file that it was created circa 1390-1353 BCE, it's very old!
Who was Francis William Edmonds?
He was an American artist active in the mid-19th century and he lived in New York State. He became known for his scenes of everyday life. His work often included a moral or some humor. He was inspired by scenes of everyday life in Dutch art of the 17th century and English art of the 18th century.
Hubert Robert, an 18th-century French artist, traveled to Italy and created drawings and paintings of the different ancient ruins/monuments that he saw.
What is this about?
This artist has made a whole series of works on mirrors. I see you took that shot without your own reflection -- but did you see yourself in it when you first walked up to the work?
Yes I did. I was mostly trying to understand why the Atwood people on the mirror were looking "away from" me. Or perhaps it is that they are actually looking back at me through the reflection?
The artist is playing with the boundaries between a work if art and the person looking at it. We can't help becoming part of this work when we look directly at it.
Regarding your question, we could probably interpret it either way. Either we and they are part of the same audience -- or -- maybe they are facing inward so that they can look at you.
Can you tell me about this? It looks neo-classical.
It's not neo-classical but it is definitely an academic work of art, based on traditions of study in established academies. The artist, Daniel Ridgway Knight trained in Paris, and later in his career began to focus on pensive, single-figure subjects. 
Can you explain this piece? Are the males in it famous rappers?
That is a painting by Kehinde Wiley. The men are not famous rappers. They are ordinary men that Wiley met on the streets who chose to pose for him.
You may have read this on the label already, but if not: "This ceiling mural of five panels depicts five young black men in various poses floating through a blue sky scattered with cumulus clouds. Large, ornate doily-like halos surround the head and most of the body of three of the figures. Only the legs of one figure are visible; a figure in the far distance has a doily-like halo encircling his head."
The artist is using famous art history paintings and art historical styles such as Baroque and Rococo but with contemporary sitters dressed in their own clothing to make a comment about the absence of Black sitters in art history.
What is this?
This is a version of the Virgin Mary from a Hispano-Philippine culture. Objects like these would have been displayed in a home among the most valuable belongings on a mostrador. At banquets and other social occasions, mostradores—flights of steps covered with rich textiles (seen at upper left of illustration)— displayed a household’s finest and most valuable objects. These pieces of furniture were particularly ideal for showcasing silver and gilt-silver trays. Imported porcelain, glass, ivory, and lacquer objects were also ostentatiously exhibited, alongside locally made lacquerware and earthenware cups. In Mexico, round lacquerware trays (bateas), often decorated with religious and mythological subjects, coats of arms, or chinoiserie (Chinese motifs), were particularly prized. Mostradores were also temporarily assembled in the family chapels of local churches, where the elite would display their costly possessions during important religious ceremonies such as the baptism of a new heir.
Where did this vase come from?
The designer, Hald, studied in Dresden, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Paris. Hald invented this glass making technique, called fishgraal. He painted the design onto the glass, a green layer in this case, with liquid bitumen. Then, all the green layer which isn't covered with the pattern is acid-etched away, so that the pattern stands out on a clear background. Then it is reheated to 400-500 degrees Celcius and carefully covered with another thick layer of crystal. The name, fish graal, comes from the fact that the first collection featured fish.
Can I know more about this Rothko series?
It is certainly unusual if you're familiar with the works that Mark Rothko is famous for -- his colorful Abstract Expressionist works. These came early in Rothko's career and were all focused on urban life during the Great Depression (1930s). He depicted city-dwellers in subway stations looking isolated and anxious.
We're wondering about the horses in the courtyard. Where are they from or were they made for the Museum?
Those are versions of Pegasus and they came to us from Coney Island! Most of the sculptures and statuary in that space (including some of those benches) are from other places in New York.
The Double Pegasus statues were on the Coney Island Fire Service High Pressure Pumping Station and they reflect a style now called "Art Deco" that was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.