Skip Navigation

When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is this? I don't understand what it represents.
Well, that sculpture is a very large version of KAWS' "COMPANION sculptures" which were first produced in Japan in 1999 as a limited edition of small toys.The large sculpture is referencing many things--consumer products, brands, childhood characters (think Disney), companionship (through the hands on shoulder/waist), and even death (through the crossed out eyes). Many visitors are making their own interpretations from these mixed symbols.We wanted a large noticeable piece in the lobby because of the new open re-design that would draw people in and let them see art right away. If you like that piece, there are also two of his paintings in the lobby. They are the brightly colored pieces on the east wall.
What causes the spiral-shape in this painting's craquelure? It's a little difficult to capture in a photograph, but the painting has periodic spiral shapes (the 2 on her left shoulder are especially prominent) and I am wondering what they are. I am an art student and have never seen patterning like this.
In general, craquelure is caused by the shrinking and expanding of the medium over time, due to changes in temperature and humidity. Also, the tension of the canvas shifts over time, tightening and loosening.
All the cracking on this piece is the result of mechanical damage.  The straight cracks at the corners are due to the tension of the canvas at the stretcher or strainer.  There are also regular horizontal cracks across the surface which might indicate that the canvas was at one time rolled. The spiral and circular cracks are the result of pressure or a blow. The impact on the canvas does not have to be strong to cause such cracks. The cracking would not necessarily be immediately visible, but would show up over time.  A preventive measure, to reduce the likelihood of impact on the back of the canvas is to secure a fitted backboard to the strainer or stretcher which receives the impact rather than the canvas. 
What is this painting supposed to symbolize? The child appears to be an oddly shaped figure, and it looks like there is no movement in its limbs.
The artist, Aaron Gilbert, draws on Surrealist ideas in art by picturing a figure (in the tub) that appears like a child and an adult at the same time.
Gilbert has said of "The New One": "As a woman or man nears parenthood, there is a fear of being consumed by the role they are about to take on. One is also confronted with many of the issues that existed between them and their parent(s)."
The artist was inspired by the birth of his own son. The woman is modeled on his wife. The baby is puzzling! It's hard to know whether it's a male or female child, and his head looks almost like an adult's. The artist may just want us to think about cycles of life and age.
I'm wondering about the hole in the queen's forehead. It looks like something of the same material was inlaid but broke off?
Over her wig the Queen wears a headdress that shows a vulture's outspread wings, the vulture's head would have been made in stone or metal. If you look closely at the top of the head of Pepy's mother, you can see the depiction of the vulture wings.
A king's headdress was called a "nemes headdress" and would have shown a cobra, or the "uraeus". The "uraeus" was a protective goddess who took the form of the cobra and the image is seen primarily on royal headwear.
Is it typical that women had vultures and men cobras?
Yes, typically, the nemes headdress was reserved for men/pharaohs.
Hatshepsut (a female pharaoh from ancient Egypt) is often seen wearing this nemes-headdress which scholars believed was so that she could solidify her power and be seen on par with a male pharaoh.
What is this barn-like house?
The Schenck Houses are Old Dutch houses from when Brooklyn, or Breuckelen, was first settled in the 1600s. The red one that you're at was built by a Dutch settler, Jan Martense Schenck, and around the corner, the Nicholas Schenck House, is the house that Jan's grandson and his family inhabited. The houses were located in present-day Mill Basin (the red one, Jan's) and in Canarsie (Nicholas', with the blue interior.)
They rebuilt it in here?
Jan's house was deconstructed on site and reconstructed in the Museum first where the Dinner Party is currently located but, when the Museum acquired the Dinner Party, the decision was made to move the Jan Schenck House to where you see it now.
The house is actually one and a half stories (there is a loft) and the beams for the upper story and the rest of the roof are kept in storage in case it can ever be moved to a location where it can be fully rebuilt. And the Nicholas Schenck House was actually being used as a storage shed in a park until the Museum purchased it from the NYC Parks & Rec Department to save it from falling into total, irreversible disrepair.
What period is this from?
It is from the late 19th century; curators estimate the date at 1895. The artist, Hendrik Willem Mesdag, was among a group of Dutch painters known as the Hague School, who worked in that city from about 1870 to 1900. Their work is Realist in style and they were especially influenced by earlier French Realist landscape painters known as the Barbizon School (c. 1830s-1870s), as well as by the 17th-century Dutch landscape tradition. Unlike other Realist painters of the period, these artists preferred to emphasize a particular tone in their painting, which earned them the nickname of the ‘Grey school’.
Mesdag really chose his colors and his composition to create a mood so this painting also has a distinct Romantic quality. But he was also a careful and direct observer of nature. He painted this storm from sketches he made on-site on the beach near the Hague. The line between the Romantic era and the beginning of Realism isn't always clear. Often times movements don't end so 'neat and tidy' but blur together during times of transitions. 
Who are they?
This series of 14 bust-length portraits represents historical Inca kings. Their names and positions in the line of royal succession are inscribed on the decorative roundels around each portrait. 
What's the school of this painting? Is it Abstract?
The artist, Pat Steir, created this in 1989 and although it looks like abstract expressionism (think Jackson Pollock), the artist does not consider herself a member of that school, which took place earlier (1940s-50s).
The style is abstract (in the label, the curator comments that this work "verges on abstraction"), but the artist does not subscribe to a certain "art school" or "movement" per se. She has her own individual influences, such as Chinese and Japanese culture and art, as well as Abstract Expressionism.
: Who is this?
Abigail Pickman Gardiner, the woman in the portrait, was the wife of the wealthy landowner and physician Sylvester Gardiner who had made his fortune importing drugs for distribution and sale. It was painted within a year of the wealthy New England couple’s 1772 marriage. 
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.