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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

         Why is it missing its hands?
These wood sculptures were carved from a single tree trunk, but the elements that stuck out beyond the basic cylinder of the trunk, most notably the hands, were carved separately and pinned in. The hands are almost always the first thing to be lost, both because they’re separate and because they stick out.
What is 'faience'?
It is technically a synthetic compound consisting of ground quartz held together by an alkaline binder and usually covered with brightly colored glaze. Faience was frequently glazed with brilliant blues which served as a cheap alternative to 'lapus-lazuli,' a mineral with a brilliant blue color that was very valuable. Faience was modeled or pressed into molds and then fired to make amulets, statuettes, and other objects.
For the Egyptians, the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. 
Tell me about the Moorish Room.
This was a very fashionable style in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Can you see the arabesque detailing on the wall? The tiling and the gilt detailing? And the very detailed ceilings?
The owner brought in a design firm to decorate in this quite trendy style, and the firm chose elements typical of the Maghreb style.
It was a very romantic style. The woman who lived here clearly wanted her visitors to see her as creative, cultured, and cutting-edge in her taste.
Can you tell me about the piano?
That is a piano-harp. A person would play the keyboard like a piano, and the keys would cause delicate rods with hammer-like ends to spring up and pluck the strings. Interestingly, the sound that comes out is that of a piano, not of a harp.
This man reminds me of Jimmy Carter.
I can see that a bit in the face and his clothing. You may have already found the label, but this piece is a portrait of Jack Baur who was head of the Museum's department of Painting and Sculpture from 1936-1952. It is by Alice Neel, a pioneer Modernist woman painter and many of her faces have that slouchey look!
Any idea what the men are trawling the water for?
Many people love that painting. Its highly realistic style draws people in, but it also has an air of mystery and sadness. 
This was painted when people were just recognizing how polluted the Gowanus Canal was and efforts were being made to clean it up. There is also an air of ambiguity that feels ominous.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.