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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Exactly where is the collar that is discussed in discription below?
The collar you're referring to is like a broad necklace. The area from Nespanetjernepere's neck to the top of the winged-ram deity, underneath the wig, is all the wesekh collar.
Okay, thank you!
You're welcome!
Is this "The Peaceable Kingdom" the only one that exists? I thought I had seen it before elsewhere but bigger?
You're right! This isn't the only version of Edward Hicks 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. From about 1820, the self-taught artist and Quaker preacher Edward Hicks painted approximately sixty versions of 'The Peaceable Kingdom'. The other versions are scattered at many different institutions across the nation. So you very well have seen a larger one.
Hi! I am wondering if you have any information regarding the commission of this work?
Hello, thanks for using the ASK app today. I have just been researching this mosaic window, it's so fascinating!
This work was created for the Charles Merrill Memorial Chapel at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Men. A woman named Abigail Merrill commissioned it in 1911 in memory of her husband, Charles. The window remained in the chapel until the 1960s when the chapel was torn down. The window came here as a gift from various donors to the Museum.
Neat, thanks!
You're welcome!
Marine mosaics are extremely captivating! I would love to hear your perspective on the window as well. It's truly an under appreciated style!
I am so intrigued by the window and just Brigham's style overall. The fact that he was using found materials, especially natural materials, well before it was popular in the arts to do so is fascinating to me. I also love that he followed in the footsteps of the big names in stained glass-Tiffany, Lamb-and created objects like lampshades and jewelry, as they were, but in the marine mosaic style. He's definitely under appreciated, I agree!
How long did this take to make?
While we don't know the exact number of man-hours put into this amazing El Anatsui work, I can tell you he hires and trains local craftsmen to assist with his projects. The work is made of aluminum and copper wire on which discarded bottle caps are then strung. I imagine it would take many people and many hours to create a finished project.
Wow!
The Fallen Angels is such a dramatic work! I encourage you to get as close as you can and look at how the artist, Salvatore Albano, handles flesh. He makes it seem so soft and realistic for being carved out of stone. This is a technical masterpiece of carving stressing how the figure can be seen in the round from all angles.
I like what you're doing there with the light and shadows against the geometric abstractions of the Brooklyn Works Progress Administration murals!
Times have changed in Williamsburg since these were made, that's for sure. The artist, Ilya Bolotowsky, was painting this mural for a narrow basement room used as a community lounge for the apartment building's residents. He intended those diagonals, horizontals and free-floating spaces to create a greater sense of space. The head of the WPA, Burgoyne Diller, wanted abstract works for this room. He felt it was appropriate for a space designed for recreation and leisure. (The prevailing style of the 1930s was a heroic figurative style showing people at work -- not a relaxing choice for a lounge area!)
How did they get the cloth to stay stiff like that?
The cloth has been gessoed, with a type of glue-like primer, to make it stiff and to keep its shape.
Who designed this?
This was designed by Terence Main, an American designer. This particular chair was designed to recall skeletal forms.
I used to know the answer to this but have forgotten. Why are the bodies shown facing toward us and the head and feet sideways?
When you see images like that, you're actually looking at multiple perspectives at once. The Ancient Egyptians would do this to communicate all of the most important aspects of an image/figure. In the case of people, they wanted to show both arms in action and, at the same time, the legs walking forward, and the face looking toward something else on the panel resulting in some strange body contortions.
Ahl, so that the parts can all be shown in their best "light."
Ancient Egyptian art frequently showed people in idealized forms, but you might notice of the some of the scribe statues, apply rolls of flab to an otherwise svelte frame as a way to demonstrate success and maturity as scribes were elite members of society.
I did notice that and I was going to ask why they had a little pudge!
You're very observant! It was basically a symbolic representation of age. Scribes were revered as some of the most learned in Ancient Egyptian society and it took them many years to achieve that status. Sometimes, men who were not scribes by trade would still have statues made that showed them seated this way to make themselves look scholarly. The Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry is an example of this.
Where is that? Both busts of Isis have a small paunch, too, I noticed.
Amunhotep is in the central "Orientation Gallery" within the Egyptian collection. He is a seated white limestone statue underneath the big ceiling mural. That might be to help illustrate her fertility as a mother goddess.
I don't see a paunched belly on Amunhotep, but what are the lines on his chest.
That's his sagging skin of old age. He's more wrinkly than paunchy.
Ah, thanks. I had noticed a slight belly on Isis.
In the case of Isis, the shape of her belly is common to many depictions of women and probably is seen as a differentiation between the shape of idealized men and women especially in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. It also something that stems from a representation of fertility.
Yes. Right as a representation of fertility
Fertility was very important to the Ancient Egyptians and all of their contemporaries in the ancient world. Numerous symbols developed to allude to the idead.
Was this painting always that dark? Or is it dark because of age?
Great question. John Quidor's work really evokes a sense of fear in the night. Likely, Quidor was inspired by Goya, who worked from a black canvas and gradually added light as opposed to the more common approach of working from light to dark. Although over time pigments do change, it's likely it was dark in general to begin with. What are some other things that catch your eye in this work?
The branches on the trees are really creepy, the way they extend like fingers toward the people in the scene. Also, that book is just barely safe from falling into the pit! It could be lost so easily.
You're right, there certainly is a lot of tension in the scene! This scene was taken from "The Adventure of the Black Fisherman," written by American author Washington Irving. Would you like a summary? It might change the way you see the painting.
Sure!
The story is that Wolfert Webber, a Dutchman of old Manhattan who recently lost all his money, becomes obsessed with the legends of buried treasure in the area. He, along with Dr. Knipperhausen (the guy in the cape and green glasses) and Sam (an African American fisherman) attempt to dig up some of the treasure supposedly buried by pirates years before.
Their midnight adventure reaches its peak when a supposedly deceased pirate appears leering at them from the cliff above. (This is the scene depicted by Quidor here.) The diggers are frightened out of their wits, as Quidor comically shows us!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.