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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What is being given to the woman?
I don't know the answer exactly, but the tortures of the damned in scenes of Hell and the Last Judgment are appropriate to the nature of their sins--the gluttonous wallow in a mire and the lecherous burn eternally in a sulfurous pit. The ball could be a reference to a sin. Whatever it symbolizes, this visual was likely obvious to the artist's contemporaries.
All of the other figures are being tortured in some capacity, so whatever the ball is, it can't be a pleasant sign!
Is this a specific style of painting?
Marc Chagall was an early-twentieth-century modernist who was famous for his poetic and dream-like figurative imagery.
Chagall absorbed many different stylistic qualities from the avant-garde movements of his time--like the expressive bright colors of Fauvism, the distorted, simplified forms of Cubism, and the mysterious psychological qualities of Symbolism and Surrealism. He also looked to folk art and folkloric imagery. While many of his contemporaries pursued ambitious experiments that led often to abstraction, Chagall's distinction lies in his steady faith in the power of figurative and narrative art. His idiosyncratic style developed in the years before World War I and underwent little change over the course of his long career. He was a prominent figure within the so-called Ecole de Paris, a group of predominantly foreign-born painters working in expressionistic figuratve styles in Paris between the two world wars.
And Impressionist too?
He was not a part of the Impressionist movement, no. He was certainly also exposed to Impressionism, but was working long after the actual movement.  
One of his most popular works, of which I am more familiar than the one in our collection, is titled, "I and the Village," and incorporates elements of Fauvism and Cubism. However, Chagall's work is very different in comparison to those working strictly within those movements.
Could you translate this for me, please?
Yes, the inscription is all in hieroglyphs and the king Arametelqo's name is located in the "cartouche" -- the oval with symbols inside of it on the left side of the object in the photo you sent me. We do have the inscription. One side reads, "Son of Re, the lord of diadems, Aramatelqo, living forever, beloved of Hathor, lady of Heliopolis, mistress of the gods, given/giver of life." And the other says, "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Wadjkare, living forever, beloved of Re-Horakhty, the great god, the lord of heaven, given/giver of life forever."
Why do these statues of the same person look so different?
The statues all show the same man, but at different points in his life--from young to old. In the statue with the long kilt you see Metjetji later in later life, with the long kilt of a senior official and, if viewed from the side, a rather flabby torso!
Even though he looks different in each statue and his clothing changes, you can see that his stance (with the left foot forward) is the same in each. You will see this pose throughout the Egyptian galleries.
Is the wallpaper original? How was it printed?
No, it is not original. The room used to be painted grey. However, wallpaper was in fashion at the time it was first built (the late 1800s). The Museum searched for documented wallpaper that would enhance the Rococo Revival style of the room. The wallpaper pattern seen today was found as a watercolor study in an illustration. In the late 1800s, Rococo Revival rooms (like the Milligan library) walls were either painted or covered with large patterned wallpapers. So it is not original but it is definitely accurate to the time period. 
Wallpaper would not have been screen printed in the Victorian era. The main method was block printing. Wallpapers would be hand-printed with the pattern carved into a block of wood, all work was done by hand. Vinyl wallpapers came into fashion in the 1940s and in the 1950s and are still used today.
Does Anselm Kiefer use his own fingernails? In a lot of his works?
Most of his textures were developed through the build up of unique materials: he explored things such as lead, concrete, straw, clay, twigs, flowers and seeds. This work does include fingernails, on the cord that makes up the anchor's line.
However, we don't know how often he used fingernails in other works.
Did Degas often paint portraits?
Yes, he did! Degas painted many portraits early in his career, before he became known for his paintings of the ballet. Before 1872, Degas spent most of his time working on portraits of his family and friends. Although portraits are usually commissioned and some of fellow Impressionists (Monet and Renoir) sought fashionable portrait commissions throughout their careers, Degas never painted a portrait on commission, always maintaining a certain independence.
Throughout his life, he chose his own subjects and was interested in capturing unguarded moments and something of an internal psychology.
How can I find the meaning for each figure on the Paracas textile?
They're not actually identified, so we don't know. We do know that you can tell if they are human or supernatural by the feet.
The one on the left in your photo is a severed trophy head, and the vines growing up from the head represent the cycle of death and rebirth.
Hi, I wanted to ask whether this is related somehow with Cretan art.
You are absolutely correct! Good eye...
This jug comes from the Minoan culture based out of Crete. It was created in Crete but was found in Egypt. It's an interesting testament to trade between Greece and Egypt around 1500 BCE! 
What is this? Tell me.
That is a block statue made of granite. The figure is wearing a cloak with an opening at the neck, with his arms folded underneath the fabric. The subject is identified as "the son of Tita," although we don't know much about him today.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.