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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until spring 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Stop by the BKM Café or BKM Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group. (Saul is temporarily closed to bring you an exciting new Brooklyn dining experience.)

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (Saul is temporarily closed. Stop by our BKM Café and Bowl.)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

This is titled 'Winged Genie'. What does genie mean in the Syrian context?
Winged genius is a translation of the ancient Akkadian “apkallu,”  or antediluvian sage. In their belief system, These sages lived before the great flood that nearly destroyed the earth. The translation "genius" goes back to a 14th century use in English, a tutelary or moral spirit who guides and governs an individual through life. Or it may come from Arabic "jinn," a pre-Islamic demon. 
Were colonial paintings so flat because it was the style or did the painters lack the training?
The flatness is primarily due to a lack of training! Most professional painters in the colonies had not received much formal education. They might have apprenticed with an older painter, but there were no art schools yet. They weren't able to study perspective and lighting in an academy, so their finished works often have that flat appearance. They were concentrating more on basic shapes and outlines.
Also, they were sometimes working from printed reproductions of European paintings, so something could be lost in translation.
How would this have been stored so it didn't tip over?
These vessels were placed either in holes in the mud floor of a house or in pot stands of clay or wood. Occasionally representations of these vessels show them simply leaning against a convenient wall. 
What is the significance of the material in which the different Egyptian statues are made (i.e. Granite vs marble vs other etc)?
Good question! With stone, it was mainly about the value and durability and what level of quality a person could afford. Interestingly, the Metjetji sculptures you are looking at were highly valuable because they were made of wood: wood was VERY rare in Egypt and had to be imported. Wood is also rare archaeologically because it does not survive as well as stone, so we do not have as many wooden examples in museums.
What are clappers?
This is a kind of musical instrument -- they would have been rattled against one another, as a percussive instrument. The ivory is actually quite durable!
What is a toilet dish is and why is it so small?
That is actually a dish used during a "toilet" in the sense of toilet rituals like cleansing, putting on makeup, shaving, etc.  We don't know the exact use of this dish in particular because it has not yet been tested for residues, but potential uses could have been for makeup, perfume, or oils.
It seems like most of these women are already pretty well known and already part of the historical record...I'm a bit unclear as to how a celebration of these women is supposed to "pay tribute to all women who have been lost to history." Any clarity on this?
That is a good point. Although we thankfully now know much about these women now,  the same couldn't be said in the 1970s, when the piece was created. Most of these women were unknown, or their biographies and contributions were lesser known. The process for  discovering these women and their contributions required years of intensive research to flesh out their biographies.
Judy Chicago wanted to restore women to the historical narrative, and she employed a team of research assistants to help her learn more about these women's lives in the pre-digital and pre-internet world. But it is a good point that now some of the women at the Dinner Party are known. It doesn't mean the work is over, however! I think the work also encourages us to move beyond this list and continue to include more women who are overlooked by history. 
What poem by Robert Southey inspired this?
The poem is called "The Voyage." It recounted the ocean voyage of a medieval king across the ocean to the New World: "Day after day, day after day the same . . . A weary waste of waters!"
Southey was an English poet active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
What's the significance of this piece to Brooklyn?
This was designed by a very influential Italian firm in the 1980s that went by the name 'Memphis' and was acquired just a few years after it was made. The decorative arts collection here is international, and it included objects that were groundbreaking works of design and that also were influential.
The style of this sideboard became huge in the 80s the bold colors, the speckled finishes, the geometrical forms. The Memphis Group consciously designed furniture that pushed traditional boundaries between elite culture and low culture and between high and low art. 
How was this produced?
Fred Wilson made this work on the island of Murano near Venice, Italy, which has a centuries-long glassmaking tradition. He was able to collaborate with master glassmakers...It was made in layers. The layers were painted black and they were placed on top of one another. It was inspired by 18th-century mirror designs -- some of them similar to the other, older mirrors on this wall!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.