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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who is Serapis?
He is a composite version of Zeus, and an Egyptian god, Amun (which is why he has ram's horns). It is actually a rare sculpture in that it depicts two faces - generally this is not the case. It is made at a time where there are a number of confluences of cultures happening.
Who is this guy?
This is a statue of Senenmut, a powerful official during the rule of Hatshepsut. He is kneeling which is a pose of worship and prayer. The combination of this pose and the symbolism of all the images together petition for Hatshepsut's well being, and for Senenmut's own eternal reward.
The symbol you see, a cobra resting on a pair of upraised arms and crowned with a cow's horns and a sun disk. All together these symbols create a specific message. It is identified in the inscription as Renenutet, a goddess of harvest and nourishment. However, it can also be read as a cryptogram for Maatkara, Hatshepsut's throne name—a visual pun made possible by the close relationship between Egyptian hieroglyphic writing and art.
Where can I find more work by Brigham?
His windows are in the Union Chapel in the Grove and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, both located on Shelter Island (off Long Island).
An interesting fact: Brigham had a second career as an illustrator for pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s!
Is this actual street art or was it made for the museum?
These works were made specifically for exhibition in an art gallery. In the early 1980s, collectors' interest in graffiti art was rising quickly, and some influential art dealers approached NYC graffiti artists and asked them to make canvases that could be shown indoors.
Street art as actual "Art" was a controversial issue at the time, when graffiti was still a big problem around the city. The people responsible for street art were seen as vandals, and their work wasn't seen as anything worthwhile. Art critics and viewers alike thought this wasn't suitable material for an art gallery.
I have a great quote from a New York Times review from 1983, for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery (a gallery that championed graffiti as art).
"...there's much to be said for encouraging some of these potentially talented kids to turn their efforts into more constructive channels. But pushing a few into the money jungle of the art world (some are 18, 17 and even 14) before they are ready will not solve anything. By and large, their products are as much an eyesore on canvas as they are on the trains."
How do we know his name?
So the god sitting on the throne, with the crook and the flail in his crossed arms is Osiris, one of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology. In ancient Egyptian his name was Wesir. At the base of the throne he sits on is a hieroglyph of a bird, (Ancient Egyptian: wr) which means great. Altogether it is the subject's name Wesirwer, or "Osiris is Great".
What is a calculator doing here?
When the American Art curator gave us a tour of these galleries, she reminded us that this calculator was really cutting-edge when it was first made. The clear silicone (the "squishy" plastic-like material) allows light to reach the solar-power battery; plus, it's unbreakable if the calculator is dropped or crushed. It also shows us exactly what's inside the object.
Many of those objects were innovative when they were first produced in their use of materials, or in their approach to shape/form. They're all everyday objects, too. Those little blue ceramics took a new approach to design because they were really made to be used by an adult holding a baby easy to grip when your hands are otherwise full!
You could also compare the calculator to other items in that case that use transparent materials -- but glass, instead of silicone! -- for see-through effects.
What is this picture of?
Oh well at least I caught you before you left the building, here is the curator's answer, it's quite interesting!:
"This vignette is sometimes accompanied by its own separate text, known as Chapter 126, while in other papyri it serves as one of the illustrations for Chapter 125. The six fire signs that surround the rectangular field help demarcate it as a lake or pool of fire that the deceased must pass to gain entrance to the Underworld. In the text that sometimes accompanying the vignette, the four baboons are described as divine guardians found in the prow of the solar boat of Re. It is to them that the deceased makes his appeal to be allowed entrance and access to the Underworld."
That illustration will help you to "read" the tiny figures along the dense border of the mantle!
The amount of detail is really remarkable. We can see the figures' garments and even their jewelry.
Also, some of them are double-sided, completely embroidered on both sides. Really labor-intensive!
This is called the "Rooster" folding stool and during this time designers and furniture makers were using 'unconventional' materials - like the plywood you see here - to create pieces.
Horus takes many different forms when he is depicted in Egyptian art: a falcon, a falcon-headed man or a sun. He symbolizes rule over disorder--something that Egyptian pharaohs wanted their subjects to understand and feel under their leadership.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.