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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until spring 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Saul Restaurant + Bar
We're delighted to welcome Brooklyn's acclaimed Saul restaurant and bar into the Museum, brought to you by Chef Saul Bolton. Saul offers lunch, brunch, dinner, and tasting menus, complemented by an impressive wine list. Children are welcome. For more information and reservations, call 718.501.6462 or visit Saul's website.

The Counter
Stop by The Counter café for a casual brunch or lunch, with fare overseen by Chef Bolton. We offer freshly prepared sandwiches, salads, sweets, and daily specials, which you can enjoy at the café or to go. The Counter also serves wine and local beer.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Stop by the BKM Café or BKM Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group. (Saul is temporarily closed to bring you an exciting new Brooklyn dining experience.)

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (Saul is temporarily closed. Stop by our BKM Café and Bowl.)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Feelin' fancy!
That is a really ornately decorated room! It was the parlor of an upper-middle-class family in Saratoga Springs, NY. The furniture and other objects were inspired by older (mid-8th century) styles of French furniture, curving lines and carved ornament, floral patterns, etc.
Is this a painting or a photo?
It's a photo that's inkjet printed.
Does the BKM have any more Pacific Coast American Indian Art on view? (Or in its collection?)
Yes, we do have other Kwakwaka'wakw (the tribal group from which the Baleen Whale Mask artist comes from) pieces in the museum, as well as pieces from other Northwest Coast Native American groups.
There are a few pieces in the Connecting Cultures exhibition that you are in right now: a "Dzunuk'wa Cannibal Woman Mask" in the far Southeastern corner and a Haida "Talking Man" mask right behind you. There are also many pieces in our "Life, Death, and Transformation" exhibition of the Arts of the Americas collection on the 5th floor. There, you can see a beautiful Transformation Mask that is also Kwakwaka'wakw, Heiltsuk house posts, Tlingit rattles, and more!
Hi guys! Can you tell me about this?
Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle. She was very beautiful and had a quite voluptuous figure! To the artist, she represented womanhood in general. He portrayed her on every scale --- big, small, in between! This was created at a time when many American artists were exploring abstraction but Lachaise was interested in the human (especially female) figure more than anything else.
He also took inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman sculptures of the human body.
Why is this called a "helmet mask"?
It is called a helmet mask because it a two-in-one object -- it's worn on the head like a helmet or hat, but the front covers the face like a mask. It is a term that we can use to describe the object which makes sense to us.
If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head. If you look closely, you can see amazing details like the horizontal hair braiding - are you able to see the back at all? If you can see it in the round, you can see the knob-like bumps where each braid ends at the back of the head.
Can you tell me more about use of cowrie shells?
Cowrie shells were a form of currency in 19th century Congo.
These are objects that have traveled thousands of miles from the coast to the center of the Congo to where the Kuba live.
They are on the mask as a symbol of the king's wealth and power.
What can you tell me about this work?
Elger Esser's photo of landscapes are made with long exposure times. Many of his compositions have long, expansive horizons and bodies of water with reflections. This particular work, titled "Nil I, Ägypten," was a great addition to our collection because it was taken on the Nile River in Egypt, and as you may know the Brooklyn Museum has the third largest Egyptian collection in the United States. 
Who is the Artist?
The artist is KAWS -- his birth name is Brian Donnelly. He's from Jersey City, but now lives in Brooklyn and he got his start as a graffiti artist in New Jersey and NYC.
This large-scale sculpture is titled "Along the Way" and it shows two of his signature "Companion" figures -- like big cartoon mice with Xs on their eyes and heads shaped like skulls-and-crossbones. There are two other works by him nearby (1 painting on the wall above the museum store and 1 on the wall on the way to the bathrooms towards the street).
What kind of wood is this? Where was this made?
The sculpture was made in the Netherlands, from a type of wood commonly known as African Teak or Afrormosia.
Is the artist's name KAWS?
Yes, this is KAWS's work. The title of this piece is "Along the Way."
Hey there. Is this based on the Mayan calendar? It has modern items baked into it.
No, the work is based upon the Aztec Calendar Stone. The artist Fernando Mastrangelo appropriates one of Mexico’s national symbols, the Aztec Calendar Stone that symbolizes the creation of the Aztec universe. Retaining the central skeletal face of Tonatiuh, the Sun God, Mastrangelo fills the surrounding areas with contemporary consumer products. Replacing the representation of objects that the Aztecs would use to worship their gods with present-day products that corporations today create based on corn such as corn syrup, cardboard, logos of companies that produce ethanol, Coca-Cola, Brazil and Mexico (3rd-4th largest producers of corn), beer, tortillas, tires, etc.  The piece advances a critical comment on the overproduction of maize by a highly subsidized the agricultural sector in the United States in anticipation of an ethanol boom; corporate proponents of this overproduction keep much of Mexico’s fertile soil ‘parked’ and unavailable to the use of hunger-troubled local populations. It was made with white corn, white and yellow corn meal, epoxy, fiberglass, wood, metal.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.