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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until spring 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Stop by the BKM Café or BKM Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group. (Saul is temporarily closed to bring you an exciting new Brooklyn dining experience.)

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (Saul is temporarily closed. Stop by our BKM Café and Bowl.)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Who was Sobekmose?
Sobekmose appears to have been a gold worker, otherwise known as a goldsmith.
Oh ok. I thought he may have a more, "honorable" title, like a scribe of the pharaoh or a philosopher.
Gold smiths were a skilled labor force, so they would have been relatively high on the social scale of ancient Egypt. From what I see here, the papyrus translates to "Gold Worker of Amun", so it's likely that he worked in a temple of the god Amun, a very prominent deity.
I see that you are looking at Standing Woman by Gaston Lachaise. Lachaise's favorite model was his wife, an American woman named Isabel Nagle :)
I'm looking at "Macombs Dam Bridge" by Edward Hopper.
So soulful and evocative. I love this Hopper.
I agree! A city scene without noise or motion. The broad format of this painting implies the continuation of the scene and the bridge and perhaps other, identical brownstone buildings beyond the limits of the canvas. 
What is Anasazi?
The Anasazi are a native people originating it what is now the American Southwest. They hail from Acoma Pueblo in the Four-Corners region.
This is neat!
This pitcher was created about 1860 in England, but it includes some very Ancient Greek styles and motifs speaking to the "Connecting Cultures" theme of this gallery. It is interesting to note that this is not a specific scene from Greek mythology, but part of the Neo-Classical tradition of referring to Classical motifs.
Thanks!
You're welcome!
Yo, why are these eyes so weird?!
Yo, I was just thinking about that the other day! The artist Joshua Johnson was self-taught. He tended to use oval-shaped faces that are more simplified than completely realist shapes. Johnson was influenced by portraits by Charles Willson Peale and the Peale family, for whom he initially may have worked as a servant in Philadelphia.
The very act of commissioning and owning a portrait was often more important to clients of the time than having a completely accurate likeness.
The Century Vase is one of many decorative arts objects produced in commemoration of the United States' 100th birthday. You can see related pieces in American Identities: The Centennial Era on the 5th floor.
If you look closely, you will see many "American" scenes in those vignettes. This served as a sort of advertisement for all of the innovations happening in the US at the time--various farming scenes, a woman at a sewing machine, as well as telegraph poles.
Thank you for the information!
You're welcome! Let us know if you have any questions as you continue to explore the museum!
You are looking at a fascinating and important papyrus scroll. The Book of the Dead was a key piece of tomb equipment for New Kingdom era Egyptians; the "book" provides instructions and prayers that pertain to the arduous journey from the world of the living to the world of the dead. Each manuscript pulls from a collection of around 200 "chapters" or "spells" and is specifically tailored to the book's owner, in this case, a prominent goldsmith named Sobekmose. This example is remarkably complete and one of our curators is currently working on publishing the text.
This is very interesting, thank you. Do you know at what age he started this scroll?
Sobekmose would not have written the scroll himself, he would have commissioned a professional scribe to do it for him. As a prestigious, skilled artisan he would have been able to afford such a commission.
Got it. Do you when the scroll will be published?
The last I heard, it is due out in 2016, so hopefully soon!
Thank you! I am learning so many things today.
You're welcome, I'm glad!
Was this particular piece an inspiration for the artist Bill Reid?
Bill Reid was definitely looking at works like the Figural Group made by a Haida artist. Reid developed a keen interest in Haida art in his late teens/early twenties. His mother was from the Kaadaas gaah Kiiguwaay, Raven/Wolf Clan of T'anuu, more commonly known as the Haida, one of the First Nations of the Pacific coast. His maternal grandfather first taught him about Haida art. He had himself been trained by Charles Edenshaw, a Haida artist of great renown. Looking at his work and this Figural Group: Raven Surmounted by Three Seated Figures, I can definitely see similarities.
Yes me too, I instantly thought of his work at the YVR airport The Spirit of Haida Gwaii in how the figures are rendered, and setting in a vessel.
Can this boy still "pedal" the bike or is it too old to work anymore?
The sculpture no longer has the electric motor that made it pedal and it is in delicate condition so I don't know that we would ever try it out. However, I assume if our conservation team said it could be done, he would pedal again with a new motor!
Interetsing, thanks.
You're very welcome.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.