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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's this?
That's a really funny sketch from New Kingdom Egypt! Though the exact origin of this imagery is not known, scholars' best guess is that the cat serving the mouse scene comes from a fable that was popular during the 19th or 20th Dynasty. It think it's a fun departure from the typically programmatic Egyptian artwork in the galleries.
Do you know what kind of material they used to draw or paint in this sketch?
The Ancient Egyptians typically used mineral-based pigments like carbon black and ochre red. Iron oxides were also used for reds. As far as tools: reed brushes were common.
The sketches give you a window into daily life. The cat and mouse were probably just for fun, but this image of the god Osiris may have been an artist's sketch while preparing for a larger piece or just practicing.
I'm curious about this.
Such a beautiful necklace! This deep rich blue that is made of is a really interesting material called faience, considered by Egyptologists as the first high-tech ceramic. The material is made of pure ground quartz, which has a dazzling, white look to it, which is why the ancient Egyptians called it tjehenet (dazzling). The quartz would have several other ingredients added to it; a small part of lime or calcium oxide and soda, all found in the rich desert sands and quarries in their landscape. These ingredients were either added to it before firing in the kiln, so that the beautiful blue would rise to the surface, or it would be put in a vessel of this powder so it would be coated from the outside while fired. Faience is glazed in many different shades of green and blue, which you'll see throughout the galleries.
Does faience still exist or do we only use ceramics now?
That's a great question! There may be artists that currently work in this method, but I'm not entirely sure if their process would be the same as an Ancient Egyptian's.
What material was used to make this?
This Funerary Wreath is made of gold which was highly valued for its beauty in the Ancient World much like it is today. This wreath is styled after Greek laurels which represents the multicultural nature of Ancient Egyptian society.
What is happening in this photo?
That photograph is by Martin Kollar and it is likely that this photograph was taken in a medical testing facility. You will find other photographs from medical testing sites in Kollar's section of the installation, too.
Kollar has experience in moviemaking, and many of his images almost resemble eerie-looking film stills. He explains a bit about his feelings photographing in this region: "I was trying to deal with how the future can be imagined in Israel---what might happen, the fear of possible danger, what that can look like. I recognize that this is a highly fictionalizing act, reflecting upon how it could be. That’s why I was always looking for those images that present a possibility or a preparation for something.”
I would like to know more about this mummy. What is the mummification process?
Mummification was a long process that had many iterations over Ancient Egyptian history. The most basic step was that the body was dried to slow decomposition by being packed in natron (a type of salt) and then linen or other materials were packed in the the face and torso help restore shape. Earlier in history most of the internal organs were removed before the drying process, but in the Roman period it was common for mummies to have their organs left inside the torso--like this man--so they would not have to be buried separately.
After all of this, of course, the body was tightly wrapped in linen. The tradition of adding a cartonnage mask (like the one you see here) began in the First Intermediate period almost 2000 years before this man died. The style of his mask though is distinctly Roman and was common at Deir el-Bahri where this mummy was excavated.
In the Tomb Reliefs of the Vizier Nespeqahuty what is the process of relief carving?
There are hints revealing the process on the fragments we have here. Initial drawings would be done in red paint, then they would carve the larger outlines and then smaller details.
Who is this artist?
This work is by Egyptian artist Ganzeer. You may have read on the label that he is a graffiti artist who rose to prominence during the Egyptian revolution in 2011.
The name Ganzeer is Arabic for "bicycle chain" and he says he chose that name because he likes to think of artists as the mechanism that pushes change forward. Here's a quote from Ganzeer: “We are not the driving force. We are not the people pedaling, but we can connect ideas and by doing this we allow the thing to move.”
Cool, thanks.
You're welcome.
This has the Star of David, is there any indication of a connection with East African Jewish heritage?
Hi, good eye and great question! The Ethopian Orthodox Church, the religion that this pendant comes from, has existed since 330 CE and throughout it's long history has been influenced by a multitude of religions. Christianity and Judaism are very prominent in the teachings and symbols of the religion, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church places emphasis on the Hebrew Bible, and even the Egyptian Coptic church, have remained somewhat significant. So yes, there is certainly a connection there.
I see, thanks!
You're very welcome! Feel free to send other questions you have as you explore the Museum today.
What are the headdresses these men are wearing?
Hi there! I'm happy to see you're checking out our new exhibition, this photograph is by Frederic Brenner, who was also the driving force behind the "This Place" project.
It seems that these headdresses are merely called "hoods" or "scarves"---I have not yet found an official name for them. Brenner has said that men who are part of a certain ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism will wear these hoods to keep them from seeing things they should not see in public in the modern world.
Thanks.
You're welcome!
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.