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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Was Tanner interested in the work of Claude Monet? The colors in this painting remind me of French Impressionism.
That's interesting, I have never thought of it that way. Henry Ossawa Tanner was heavily inspired by the artist James McNeill Whistler, who experimented with tonal harmonies in his painting.
Here, Tanner is depicting the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, with a crowd gathered at the Place d'Etoile, you aren't far off in thinking about French Impressionism in terms of subject matter. 
Thanks! I love how the image appears to be constantly fading, but is vibrant and symbolic. Again, thanks much!
I totally agree. Let us know if you have more questions as you explore!
What is this?
Good find! It's called "OLPC XO Laptop." It was designed in 2006 by Yves Behar from Switzerland. The idea was to create a computer that was affordable and would be useful (especially for children) in the developing world. That's why it has those antennae to pick up data signals!
What is this made out of?
Amoeba Rocking Chair designed by Isabelle Moore is made out of plywood covered in recycled, multi-colored plastic.
What is this?
That is a 4-piece coffee set from circa 1959 designed by Michael Jerry.
What is it made of?
The metal is pewter, once very popular for dishes, and the handles are a material called cane.
Hi. This reminds me a lot of Canada's Group of 7? Were they contemporaries? Did they share influences?
That is a really interesting connection! Manievich painted "Birch Trees" in 1911.  Abraham Manievich was landscape painter from Kiev who exhibited in Paris in 1913, just before World War II.  While the Group of 7 was a little bit later, but they likely had similar influences. Manievich was heavily influenced by Cézanne in terms of his heavy brushstrokes and flattened landscapes. Cézanne's work had an impact on nearly every modernist painter of the early 20th century. In other works Manievich showed his interest in the bright harsh colors of the Blaue Reider school which is also apparent in the paintings of Canada’s Group of 7, particularly Lawren Harris. Common to all of these artists was a desire to have a distinctive voice apart from European painting that reflected their heritage and local.
Thanks. That's helpful and I suppose it makes sense that northern hemisphere landscape artists would have similar styles.
You're welcome! And you're right, before the reign of Stalin and ultimately the Cold War, Russia was a big part of the development of modern art in the early 20th century. Plus Russia and Canada are not so environmentally different in some areas.
Is this made from a sea shell?
It is a seashell! Specifically, a strombus shell. If you press the button on the case that corresponds with that object, you can hear it being played. Definitely try out some of those buttons, it makes the instruments so much more interesting being able to hear them!
What language is on that?
The language you see is called Akkadian, the language of diplomacy for thousands of years. The writing system is called Cuneiform which was developed in Mesopotamia in the 4th millennium BCE.
Thank you!
You're welcome! The text itself speaks to the greatness of the king, Ashurnasirpal II, he appears in these reliefs only once. Can you find the one human figure?
Is that it? That character has no wings.
You're right! You'll also notice that he is the only one wearing that type of headdress. Ashurnasirpal II was a king of the Assyrian Empire who commissioned the Northwest Palace at Nimrud or Kalhu where these reliefs come from.
What were the genies supposed to represent?
Genies, in the Assyrian tradition, are a type of supernatural being that largely serve protective purposes for the king and his domain. They were also seen as sages who could predict the future. They were understood to have existed since before the great flood that destroyed the world.
In some of the pictures, the genies are holding a bag. What is that supposed to represent?
That is called a "sacred pail." It may contain a liquid used for purification.
Tell me about this!
The artist, Jane Dickson, belonged to a generation of artists working in Manhattan's cheaper (and often more dangerous) neighborhoods in the 1980s. Her subject matter includes the sensory overload of city life and the un-beautiful edges and corners of America's urban and suburban environments. This was painted as a view out of the window of her Manhattan studio.
Jane Dickson has said of her work: "A wary observer of necessity, I paint to locate baseline reality within an unstable world. Child of immigrants, I have enlisted painting in my life-long study of American-ness to examine its cultural pivot points, shifting parameters and anomalies."
Can you tell me about these?
Sure! Dotty Attie is a painter, photographer and printmaker who is perhaps most well known for her feminist reworkings of Old Master paintings. This work appropriates details from two paintings by the artist Thomas Eakins, 'The Gross Clinic' and 'The Champion Single Sculls'.       
Attie has juxtaposed these details with text recounting a controversial event in Eakins's professional career, when he allowed female students to sketch from a live, nude male model and consequently lost his teaching position.
With this work she is encouraging the viewer to actively think about hypocrisy in American society (why do we allow images of violence against the human body but condemn nudity?) as well as gender discrimination in the art world.
If you're curious, you can see a work by Thomas Eakins himself that shows an artist working from a live female nude in his studio in that same gallery. The painting is titled, 'William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River."
How come this one doesn't have a description?
That's a great question! While I can't speak for the American Art curatorial staff, I can tell you that a lot of thought goes into which objects get expanded labels and which do not and many factors can go into those decisions. Perhaps, because this is clearly a provocative image, the curators wanted to leave it a bit of a mystery? Perhaps they felt it did not need further explanation? I can only speculate!
Is there something you would like to know about it?
Woah, that's cool
Yeah, what's the background or context for the painting?
Definitely! The artist, John Koch, depicts himself with a male model, Ernst Ulmer, who was a piano student of Koch's wife. The sculpture in the background of the painting is another work by Koch that depicts Prometheus, character in ancient Greek myth. Prometheus was punished by Zeus, king of the gods, for stealing fire and giving it to humans. This sculpture shows Prometheus chained to a rock and being tormented by a bird of prey. He is being freed by the god Hercules. There's some humorous interplay between the painting's figures and the sculpture in the back. The theme of fire comes back with the model giving fire to the painter (Koch) to light his cigarette.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.