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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

There are a lot of diagonals, and the neon enhances the dark blue. Can you tell there are, what looks like, a set of eyes behind all those lines?
If you are curious, KAWS' large-scale sculptures and brightly colored paintings play with imagery associated with consumer products and global brands.
KAWS' overall body of work makes reference to consumer imagery through its allusion to childhood characters and crossed-out eyes. If you look carefully, you will be able to see the eyes behind the lines have crosses on them. This is a signature motif of the artist, just like the eyes in the large sculpture in the lobby.
The bright colors and lines also come from the artist's background as a graffiti artist in the 1980s and 1990s.
I don't get this one...it's disturbing, grotesque, but hard to articulate what it represents
The significance of the piece is definitely open to interpretation, but it seems to suggest that she has gotten access to the chicken coop as she holds a key in the one hand and the head of a chicken in the other.             
Kara Walker often plays with provocative or problematic imagery. In the label, the curator also provides an additional interpretation of this scene when she writes: "Walker portrays a self-empowered anti-heroine who possesses the key to her own salvation, in stark black-and-white."
In general, the visual vocabulary of Walker alludes to the slave plantation world evoking stereotypical images and situations from black memorabilia, folklore, historical novels, movies, cartoons, and the 19th century slave autobiography. 
In general, Walker includes in her work stereotypical characters featuring the master, the mistress, the Negress/slave mistress, and other characters that reference Civil War imagery from the South such as plantation mansions, shackled slaves, Confederate soldiers, and Southern belles. This linocut representation of the girl with the keys is part of the artist's signature wall installations that Walker designs conveying distressing and provocative narratives of plantation life and slavery in the united states.
Do you know why George Lovett Kingsland Morris was so invested in Native American Art? Was he himself Native American?
No, he himself was not Native American at all. He was born into an old and affluent Anglo-American family.
He was interested in reinterpreting Native American art and craft as abstract "fine" art because he was looking for "authentic" American source material. Abstraction in American art was influenced by slightly earlier European movements like Cubism, and American artists were trying to put a homegrown stamp on the movement.
Ironically, Morris was part of a group known as the "Park Avenue Cubists."
Why is this piece is called "Landscape"?
Stuart Davis often made sketches of locations that he visited in New York or Paris or port towns in New England and later used them as sources for paintings.
In the process, he would simplify the forms, making them more geometrical and taking away shading, perspective, and other traditional means of showing space on a flat surface... "abstracting" the image.
I don't know the exact source for this one, but if you look closely... do you see forms and lines that could suggest ladders or the riggings of ships?
Also this Hartley painting nearby might represent marching band noises, that's a nice connection!
There's a nice cluster of several works that evoke music and sound in that corner! You already spotted the parade music of Marsden Hartley's painting. He liked attending military processions in Berlin and listening to the military brass bands. There are also details in this painting that refer to German military uniforms and military decorations.
During the interwar years, John B. Flannagan was a leading American proponent of the method of direct carving—working directly on the material with one's own hands, instead of having the sculpture reproduced from a model using mechanical aids or assistants. He also believed that, within every rock, there was an image waiting to be freed by the sculptor. It took Flannagan two years to discover the subject matter for "Jonah and the Whale" in a piece of bluestone he found in the fields around Woodstock, New York. The work depicts the biblical prophet Jonah imprisoned in the belly of a whale, his punishment for disobeying God. (He was released after repenting.) In the color, shape, and texture of the stone, Flannagan found the basic form of his whale, adding economical incisions to articulate the creature's mouth, eyes, and fins. Jonah's fetal position and the biblical promise of redemption evoke the theme of rebirth—a persistent theme in Flannagan's art and a metaphor for his creative process.
The process of direct carving is really important for that time -- and the way the artist revealed the true nature of the material, its texture and contours, is fascinating.
How do the curators know that these are humans in masks and not animals?
Visually it is possible to infer that these are masked human figures, because of their body. You can see that the upright position of the figures suggest that these are humans in disguise. If you look closely, you can see human ears beneath the masks, and on the back of the sculpture you can see that the figures have human feet and backsides. The back of the slab is decorated with eighteen crouching jaguars. The jaguar may have been a totem animal or clan symbol of the deceased. You can compare the rendering of the jaguar bodies to those of the human figures in masks.
Any ideas about this see-saw like roof opening on the model house?
The opening in the roof is actually to let the smoke out during ceremonies and other occasions when fires are lit.
Well, with the directions of wind and rains, you would want as much smoke as possible to get out of your house, yet let in as little rain, so you would want it to swing multiple directions-rather ingenious design!
The Northwest Coast's climate is a lot like a rainforest, but with the added winds of being so close to the Pacific ocean.
This work created in the form of a Nike Sneaker by Paa Joe is typical for the shape and style of a coffin in Ghana to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased. Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffin) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more. 
In this case, it is a Nike sneaker, a symbol of status and modernity in the late twentieth century. As people make the transition from one world to the unknown next, an object (a coffin) representing another object (in this case, a shoe) provides comforting familiarity. This particular one was created for the art market and was never actually used as a coffin. Funerals are often celebrations of the life of the deceased and include feasts. Morning turns to celebration as the coffin is carried to all the places that the deceased would want to say goodbye. Praise salutes, blessings, prayers and hymns fill the air as the coffin is taken to a burial site.  In terms of "connecting cultures," it shows how culture, especially material culture, is global today. People use and buy the same brands all over the world.
Could you please tell me a little more about the artist?
Jules Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are largely inspired by the French countryside. Academically trained at the Ecole des Beaux arts in Paris, his paintings combine an idealized view of farm workers and the countryside in an era of industrial growth. He was immensely popular during his time with both the public and artists. Van Gogh walked 87 miles to see his work! While it was unusual at the time to paint peasants as an artistic subject, Breton’s idealized views of fieldworkers hit a popular chord. His work is often compared to that of Jean-Francois Millet, who painted heroic peasants emphasizing the hardship of their labor.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.