Skip Navigation

When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Beautiful stone work! What tools would Hopewell artists use to chisel the stone with such detail and smoothness?
The Hopewell likely would have used other stones for their carvings. The smoothness indicates the use of rubbing, wet polishing, or sand.
Thanks! Is the bird made of a soft kind of stone, like limestone?
Though the Hopewell didn't develop bronze technology, they sure did accomplish great feats in stone and ceramics. This is a loan item and we haven't yet done extensive material analysis on this work. We do know that it is made of a harder stone. 
Are there any other works nearby that catch your eye or mystify you with the way they were produced?
All of them in fact! I'm continuously amazed at the purely manual craft skills of people who lived several thousand years back!
I am as well! I couldn't imagine developing this technology myself! I'm always taken by the nearby Mimbres bowl. (It has an antelope and a man depicted in the center.)
The Mimbres people were some of the earliest people to develop reduction firings to achieve the black on white decoration, building an open kiln fire that was so hot it actually reduced the amount of oxygen within the fire. (If you're a ceramic nerd this is a big feat.)
Cool! And thank you for directing my attention to this beauty, its patterns and figures are incredibly delicate, the graphic parts reminds me of Art Deco almost!
I love the imagery of the Mimbres people myself. It's so mysterious because they vanished long before European contact, nearly all of their bowls depict these strange dreamlike scenes and a majority of them have these holes in the bottom.
Many have been found in graves, although we are not certain where this particular bowl was found, and scholars can only speculate what the holes might mean, or what the strange images are. One at the Met has a deer putting on an armadillo mask on for example.
That's fascinating! I bet it carries deep meaning that we just don't know today.
Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
Is this a person or a cat?
This ceramic by a Mayan artist depicts a human man wearing a jaguar-skin costume. Jaguars represented power and royalty in Mayan culture at the time.
Humans wearing animal features or costumes may represent shamans. Shamans are members of the community who can intercede between the world we live in and the supernatural worlds.
Who made this?
This is a work by the Canadian Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak titled "Beautiful Fish (Iqalutsiavak)." In her works, Ashevak depicts things from her everyday world and some ideas are rooted in her dreams.
This is so interesting! Can you tell me about this? 
"Making Babies for Indian Market" is by Roxanne Swentzell. In the work, she is referencing the Santa Fe Indian Market, which occurs on one weekend a year in Santa Fe. It began in 1922.
Pottery as a Native art form is practiced by women in the Southwest and Swentzell comes from a family of acclaimed potters. Roxanne Swentzell has said about this work: "Making Babies for Indian Market is about the creative process. My pieces are like children that are born through me. Its about all the 'babies of artwork' born because of Indian Market."
What is this?
This is a Thunderbird Transformation Mask from the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia, Canada. It would have been worn for dance performances during potlaches.
Potlatches are communal celebrations where a family or group gives gifts to the community. The gifts are often things like food and an opportunity to experience a particular dance the family 'owns.' This mask would be danced in Winter Ceremony potlatches .
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.