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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Where is this piece from?
It likely comes from a temple or shrine where it would have been the subject of worship. The deity depicted is Osiris; he can be identified by his crown. This statue dates to the Eighteenth Dynasty, but we unfortunately don't know it's exact find location.
What does the eye mean?
The Eye of Horus, or the wedjat-eye, symbolizes health, rejuvenation, and prosperity. It shows up a lot in ancient Egyptian art!
Is it fair to call this a weave?
Absolutely! Hair dressing was ritualized and elaborate in Ancient Egyptian high society. These extensions would have been woven into a wig.
Why's the hippo belly up?
As you can see, the figurine's legs have been broken off. Showing the hippo this way highlights the missing legs and allows us to see how the bright blue glaze attaches to the white faience body. Egyptians would snap off the legs of hippo statuettes before placing them in tombs so the dangerous hippo could not harm the deceased on the journey to the afterlife. 
How did Rodin make these sculptures?
Rodin used the "sand casting" method. He would have created his intended form in clay, then built a mould around it using a mixture of special sand, salt, and a binding agent. When the mould was ready, he would remove the clay from the center and then pour liquid bronze into the mould. Unlike other bronze casting techniques available at the time, sand casting allows for the creation of multiples. 
Is this shaq's shoe?
Haha! It's a bit small for Shaq if you ask me! All joking aside this work is actually a coffin intended for burial by Ghanaian artist Paa Joe. In Ghana it is common to make a personal statement by reflecting the profession, interests, or characteristics of the deceased.Other figurative coffins (also called fantasy coffins) that Paa Joe has crafted are shaped like cell phones, lions, airplanes, cameras, birds, fish, Coke bottles, and more.
If you had to have a coffin reflect your personal story, and interests what shape would you want it to be?
Hmm good question. Probably a barrel of whiskey, with whiskey still in it.
You sound like my kind of person!
Funerary art, and material culture can tell us a lot about how people lived and worked. You can see some great examples of funerary art in our African Art galleries and in Egyptian art on the 3rd floor. Let me know if you have anymore questions
What was this mask used for?
This mask by the Bamum or Tikar in West Africa . This type of headdress would only be worn by members of the men's warrior society known as the Nsoro. Traditionally danced in pairs with one mask representing the king or chief and the other representing his wife.
These would be worn at funerals of important members of society, such as kings, chiefs, elders and members of the Nsoro society.
Why is is scary?
How?
 The Nsoro society tasked with settling disputes, and so perhaps this mask was meant to be a bit frightening to reiterate that point.
How would it be worn? The fiber structure below the face is there to lift the mask above the wearers head, it would be covered by a grass skirt. The straps would be held by the wearer to stabilize the mask.
I sense that 'when' might be the next question. This mask was made in the late 19th century :)
What is egungun?
Egungun is a Yoruba traditional masquerade danced once a year to call forth and pay respect to the ancestral dead, who reenter the community through these costumes.
What I like most about egungun is how ornamental the fabric are, the example we have here really showcases cross cultural exchange. Some of the fabrics and dyes are produced locally, while others are traded.
Why are women barred from this practice in Africa?
Women are actually quite involved in masquerade, creating costumes, singing and dancing, as well as spectatorship. In general women simply do not wear wooden masks Africa is such a large continent with millions of people, so there are always exceptions! Women wear wooden masks in a few instances such as the Mende women in Sierra Leone who wear them in the Sande society. 
The role of women in masquerade traditions is being challenged and critiqued by numerous contemporary art, nearby works by Zina Saro-Wiwa and Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Saya Woolfalk all are investigating femininity in relationship to wooden masks.
What ballgame are they playing?
There were several different versions of the ballgame in ancient Mesoamerica. The game played here likely had two teams of players moving a rubber ball around a I-shaped ballcourt with the goal of getting the ball through a small ring. It's believed to be somewhat similar to soccer.
Most of the equipment ancient players used hasn't survived into the modern age but we have depictions of players in stone and stone replicas used for ceremonies to show us what it would have looked like.
Using feet only?
In some of cases, yes. Players would also use their hips to move the ball through the court. 
What are Kachina dolls?
Kachina dolls are made to instruct children on the Kachina spirits. There are many different spirits and they can bring things like rain and fertility to a community.
There are about 500 individual Kachina spirits! They are not activated until the doll has been painted and decorated. This particular Kachina doll was created by Harry Shelton.
This Kachina doll represents Tawa (Sun). This Kachina is rarely seen and is part of the traditions of specific families.
How does the Kachina doll relate to their ceremonial calendar?
The Hopi and Zuni have complex calendars.  They have different cycles of when Kachinas appear but all the ceremonies are related to agricultural seasons. Some ceremonies are tied to the summer and winter solstices, for example.       
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.