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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until spring 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Stop by the BKM Café or BKM Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group. (Saul is temporarily closed to bring you an exciting new Brooklyn dining experience.)

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (Saul is temporarily closed. Stop by our BKM Café and Bowl.)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

I would like to know the meaning of all the little characters around the Paracas Mantle?
That's an excellent question and to be honest, our curators would like to know as well! Unfortunately, many of the characters remain unknown to us but we do know that you can tell if they are a human or supernatural figure by looking at the feet.
I found a llama!
Awesome! There are so many different and amazing figures. Some are definitely recognizable but some are a total mystery.
How it was made?
This object would have been hand sewn and was likely used as a funerary wrapping it is made of cotton and 'camelid fiber' which means fiber, or hair, from an animal such as an alpaca or vicuna. It is also mysterious because it was found in Paracas but the sewing technique is known to be from the Nasca peoples so it is a question of where exactly it originates.
Is this a unique piece or there are other pieces similar to this one?
This piece is unique but we do have other Paracas and Nazca textiles in the collection. We do have another funerary textile in the Life, Death and Transformation galleries in the front room where all of the skulls are! Feel free to check that one out too if you get a chance--the two look pretty different from each other. The one on view now is a Wari tapestry-weave textile.
What's the deal with this thing?
This is one of the latest additions to the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The artist is known as KAWS, and the work's title is "Along the Way."
Do you know why the artist made the choice to put X's in place of the eyes?
That's definitely one of his signature motifs -- the X-ed out eyes. You'll also see them in the two paintings by KAWS that are hanging around the lobby.
It definitely makes them more mysterious and even a little troubling -- I end up wondering, are they asleep? are they blind? are they just sad? It shows us that these cartoon-y creatures might have a darker side.
We are mostly curious about how this would work. My boyfriend thinks the detailed hands and faces are not typical of stained glass, but I disagree. What say you?
Great question! This work illustrates Lamb's unique method of "double-painted" flesh areas, which involved painting two plates of different types of glass with separate colors of enamel that shine through each other for a rich, lifelike effect. This was definitely his style that has a very painterly quality unlike many older stained glass works that each pane of glass was one color.
Would children be allowed in this room?
Do you see the play area next to here in the library room? The curator created that space to illustrate that children would have used that space.
Within the parlor space, the curator also placed a smaller child's chair, which would tell us that children would have been in that space. Children would be taught proper etiquette in the parlor, notice the toys are not in that room! 
Do people still use these masks today?
Yes, the masks like this are still used today in ceremonies. They are used in ceremonial dances called a potlach, generally taken place during the winter. Songs, dances and rituals are performed and gifts may be given at this time. When not used such masks are wrapped carefully and hidden away. When worn and danced and closed the mask portrays a bird head with a large yellow beak. When open, the head and large beak divide, expand, and become a full-bodied bird with outstretched wings and a human face, thus portraying a transformation story.
The eyes and ears may have been filled with incrustation of precious metals. The ears could also have worn earflares, like those the skeleton wears on the other side. The depression at the navel was probably used for ritual offerings.
Wow, this is amazing! Do you know what it represents?
This figure represents the duality of life and death. Here the cloth bundle is unwrapped, revealing the skeletal figure inside. It is from the Huastec culture of the Gulf Coast Mexico who flourished at the same time as the Aztec. It is possible that the skeletal figure represents a sacred ancestor whose skeleton was carried through the city by the somber young man during an important religious rite. The entire sculpture may be seen as a commemoration of that rite.
What are the spots on this painting?
That painting is by a Mexican artist named Miguel Cabrera. The woman is wearing several artificial beauty marks on her face. They are small circles of black silk or other fabric that she would temporarily paste onto her skin. In the 18th century, they were thought to enhance the wearer's beauty.
Were the spots added later? They appear raised.
I think that effect may just be the application of the paint -- since they are original to the painting.
I was curious as to why this looks so different than others on this wall.
It was chosen to show the different kind of styles of paintings that was made in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century. Unlike many of the other works on display, Kandinsky’s painting is geometric and brightly colored, with  abstract forms floating in limitless space. By the early 20th century, many avant-garde artists wanted to show their radical beliefs not by depicting politically subversive subject matter in a realistic way (like Vasily Vereshchagin’s giant paintings of the Russo-Turkish War on the left) but rather by expressing their emotions through evocative brushwork and vivid color. While living in Germany from 1896 to 1914, Kandinsky was the leader of one such group of artists called the Bleu Reiter. (His paintings then were very painterly and fluid.)  When Kandinsky returned to Russia in 1914 due to the outbreak of WWI, he encountered Russian Suprematism, a radical art movement that was less interested in expressing personal feeling than in transforming art and society by painting pure geometric forms. Although at the time Kandinsky stuck to his more expressive style, by the late 1920s, back in Germany, he incorporated precise lines and geometric shapes into his artistic vocabulary. He was influenced in this by his colleagues at the Bauhaus, an innovative German art school that focused on applied arts, craft, and architecture. For Kandinsky, however, these forms were not  mechanical but symbolic of deep spiritual meanings, theories which he described in his many published books on art.
Why is this painting so long & narrow?
It is actually the final design of a mural. The full size is even larger and is on permanent view at Texas Southern University Museum.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.