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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the concealed bar in the corner is "most important." Important being defined in this instance as cultural significance.  The bar has an interesting history. With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
How did they make the blue color?
That brilliant blue is a mineral (especially copper)-based glaze applied to white faience (quartz-based paste) and fired at a high temperature. This glazing method was seen as a cheaper, synthetic alternative to precious stones like lapis lazuli and turquoise.
You will see many blue toned objects in these galleries - the lighter shade of blue was almost interchangeable with green, the color of the sea, plants, vegetation, and thus health and life. The darker shade of blue was associated with the dark primordial waters out of which creation first appeared, as well as the night sky through which the sun-god travelled to be reborn every morning.
Where were these tiles displayed?
We don't know what kind of interior space these tiles were originally placed in, but a similar building of that period would have been the Darwish Pasha Mosque, built by an Ottoman governor in Syria in the 16th century.
Why doesn't the Skipping Girl have a head?
There are a couple of explanations to the missing head in Skipping Girl. The artist, Yinka Shonibare, has said that the reason he doesn't give heads to his sculptures (this is a recurrent motif in his work) is so that the viewer can move away from race identification. By not giving the sculpture specific features, the race can be ambiguous.
However, the curator also provided an interpretation of this where he made a relationship between this sculpture and overall West African belief. The Yoruba people believe that the Ashe or spirit is located in the head. During colonization the Yoruba people perceived the new governing agents as being missing their Ashe or their spirit, in this way the artist is also commenting on the legacy of colonization.
What is the difference between the two sides?
That sculpture is a Serapis figure. You may have read this on the label, but Serapis was a composite god created early in the Ptolemaic (Greek) rule of Egypt to unite Greeks and Egyptians. The deity combined aspects of Egyptian gods (especially Osiris, the ruler of the Underworld) with Greek deities (particularly Zeus, the king of the gods). This particular Serapis is interesting because it's two heads seem to suggest a male/female duality: The horns point to Zeus/Amun (an Egyptian creator or sun deity on one side), And Hera on the other.
Which century does this Buddha belong to?
That Shakyamuni Buddha is from the late 19th-early 20th century.
Thanks. Do we know why some are seated while others are standing figures?
Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.) the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting, etc. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive.      
The Buddha you sent may depict the The bhūmisparśa or "earth witness" mudra. It depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. It represents the Buddha asking Prithvi, the devi of the earth, that she witnessed his enlightenment.
What's the most important object in this room?
Arguably, the most important object in that room is the concealed bar in the corner.
With etched glass walls that salute France, it is hidden in the corner in defiance of Prohibition, which forbade alcohol consumption in the United States from 1919 to 1933.
Did the artist get in trouble for his paintings? They're very moving.
Yes, Vasily Vereshchagin's depictions of the negative, rather than the heroic, aspects of war found him in opposition to the Russian state for most of his life. This painting and the one next to it were both painted from his personal observations of a horrific event  during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-78). After the Russian army sacked the city of Plevna in northern Bulgaria, they marched thousands of Turkish soldiers to Russian prisoner-of-war camps on the Danube River in the dead of winter. Thousands died. The paintings were so displeasing to the Russian military and those closely tied to the monarchy that the Grand Prince refused to see them when they were exhibited in Moscow in 1879. Consequently,later that year when the Grand Prince was in Paris, Vereshchagin refused to see him or let him see his paintings. After this, Grand Duke Vladimir, the President of the Academy of Arts, began to severely criticize Vereshchagin for his "impossible subjects." Vereshchagin's works were censored in Russia and he had a difficult time selling them in Europe. By the turn of the century, he was famous for his "war against war" and his work was cited and debated by peace activists and politicians. In 1901, he was nominated for the first Nobel Peace Prize.
Very cool. What does the cuneiform writing across this work say?
The translated text speaks about the power of King, here is a translation of part of the text: "I am Ashur-nasir-pal the obedient prince, the worshiper of the Great Gods, the fierce dragon, the conqueror of all cities and mountains to their full extent, the king of rulers who tames the dangerous enemies, the [one] crowned with glory, the [one] unafraid of battle, the relentless lion, who shakes resistance, the king of praise, the shepherd, protection of the world, the king whose command blots out mountains and seas..."
Why is this considered innovative?
If you look at details like the waterfall and the stream, you can see one of Tiffany's innovations in glassmaking. These included swirling together different colors of glass while they were still hot and liquid. It was almost like painting with glass.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.