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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is there a list of the specific locations of Jung Jin Lee's pictures? They are extraordinary.
As far as we know, no. Her series is titled "Unnamed Road," as I'm sure you've noticed if you've looked at the titles of the photographs. Lee likes the obscure and the unknown. She says of her photographs, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible." I don't think she really wants us to know exactly where these photographs were taken, if that makes sense. She likes the obscurity of it and the question the viewer may ask themselves, "where is this? where exactly is this place?" as you are asking now.
Makes sense. It also answers another question I had when I walked in, namely, the fact the proper Hebrew for "This Place" would have a definite article. But it doesn't, which appears grammatically "incorrect" in its vagueness. Perhaps that is intentional. 
Can you explain what is happening in the picture? Is the family looking at a random picture? Or is the picture relevant to the family?
Hi there! The family depicted in the image were killed by a Palestinian sniper or suicide bomber. The family standing near to the billboard is the surviving husband and father (only the wife and children were killed, while they were driving in their car) with his second wife and second family of children.
Are any of the photos retouched? In other words, is the photo within the photo a sign the family isn't looking at or could it be a photo of same family superimposed later?
The only photographer in the exhibition who does a lot of post-editing on photos is Jungjin Lee, and she speaks a lot about her process. The process you're describing--with the image superimposed--would not be the case here. This is a photo of an actual scene.
Thanks.
You're very welcome! Feel free to ask more questions as you explore the Museum today.
Do you know why the eye shades? Are they part of a sect?
It is a very particular ultra-Orthodox sect within Judaism, in which men cover their eyes (or in some cases their whole heads) with dark veils in order to protect them from seeing things or people that may offend or upset them in public. The idea of covering the face started as part of preparations for the pilgrimage to the grave of nineteenth century rabbi Nachman of Breslov in the Ukrainian city of Uman. However, this idea was extended to all Jews and face covers are now promoted as the best way to avoid looking at indecent women who wear clothes that do not abide by the teachings of Orthodox Judaism.
Thanks. Very interesting.
It is, isn't it? You're welcome.
Dude, this Jeff Wall piece is amazing.
With the olive pickers? Isn't it a great way to open the exhibition?
During his first visit to Israel in 2010, Jeff Wall came across a group of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned the following year to recreate the scene from memory, using local men as models. Although he originally saw the men at dusk, he shot this image (actually, a digital composite of images) at dawn.
Thanks!
Do you take issue with Jeff Wall's manipulation of his lived experience for aesthetic improvement?
Hm, that's a very good question. I'm not sure recreating the memory is too problematic for me, although it did take him 3 weeks to make the perfect images to combine. I am curious as to why he decided to change the time of day, however.
I would have issue if this was presented as a journalistic image. But none of the artists in the exhibition identify as journalists. But what do you think?
I don't care at all.
This show is amazing. But there seems to be a lot more men than women. Although maybe it's just cause I haven't made it all the way through the show.
I'm glad you enjoy it. You're right, there are only 3 female photographers in the exhibition. My colleagues and I noticed that too.
Do you have a favorite body of work in the show?
Not a favorite work, but a favorite body of work. I'd say Martin Kollar, I appreciate how surreal his "field trips" are.
Yes! His work is so amazing. I've wanted the book he made of this work since it came out.
I believe it is available for sale in our bookshop.
I appreciate Jungjin Lee's work. Her use of materials is very seductive.
What's your favorite image?
But probably the one of the truck covered in cardboard. Or the one of the bizarre road block sculptures.
One thing I appreciate about Kollar is he remains very tight-lipped about where he was, and what these people are doing in the photographs. So for me the work never breaks from that surrealism, and is never grounded by where it was taken or what the strange people in the photos hope to accomplish with their even stranger actions.
You're good at this!
Haha, thank you I try. Though it's easy to have a conversation with insightful visitors!
What am I looking at here?
Hello! I see you've found our new exhibit, "This Place"!
You are looking at Jeff Wall's photo titled "Daybreak." I'm not sure if you've had the chance to read the label yet but during his first visit to Israel in October 2010, Jeff Wall came upon a scene of Bedouin olive pickers sleeping on a farm near Mitzpe Ramon, which sits in the shadow of a large prison. He returned for the next harvest in October 2011 to recreate the scene and make this image.
This is a staged photograph. Wall hired a group of Bedouin olive pickers to pose for this photo. He set up camp in a nearby motel and shot the same scene every day for about two weeks, returning over and over to the site at early dawn.
Who is this?
This is the mummy and anthropoid coffin of Thothirdes. His mummy is elaborately wrapped using two colors of linen. His coffin is adorned with mythological scenes and writings that would have been important for his journey to the afterlife and the preservation of his spirit.
If you look closely at the center of the lid of the coffin you'll see an image of Thothirdes as a mummy. The human headed bird nearby represents his "ba," one aspect of his spirit. The ba was believed to be an individual’s physical and psychic alter ego.
Hi there! Welcome to Agitprop! What drew you to this particular work?
I liked the bold, graphic nature of it.
Nice! I agree, the figures are super graphic. I like the colors too. I'm not sure if you saw the label for this yet, but this banner was created for an event held in Trafalgar Square in London in solidarity with Chilean democracy, which had been shattered by a military coup the previous year. It shows the actions that led to the overthrow of the government in Chile.
Oh, cool!
It says this is the torso of Dionysus (Greek God) and it is in the Egyptian Art section. Why would it be here?
That's a great question! The simple answer is that Egypt was taken over by Alexander the Great and it did become a part of the Hellenistic World, even though the Greek leaders of Egypt at the time still called themselves pharaohs. Dionysus, specifically, has direct ties to Egypt as well. As you may have read in the label, the Greek writer Antoninus Liberalis recounts that Dionysus hid in Egypt disguised as a goat to escape Zeus’s wrath after an attempted rebellion.
What does this spell?
"SHAMEAK." It's the graffiti tag of one of the ICY SIGNS painters. It's a little hard to read!
Artists paint here? That's cool!
Yes! Artists from ICY SIGNS come to paint three times a week: Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. The installation is always growing and changing.
Also, the exhibition has been extended to August 21st, so if you come back in a few weeks or months it will look completely different!
What distinguishes this as a genie from other figures in these reliefs?
Genies can be distinguished by their wings and the horned helmets. If you look closely at what the figure has on his head, the part that points forward and sort of 'swoops up' are the helmet horns. "Genie" actually describes most of the figures in these reliefs. You can tell Ashurnasirpal II--the only human--because he has no wings and wears a different crown.
What was he holding?
Akhenaten holds up a bouquet and presents it to the Aten. The arms that you see to the left are actually hands of the end of rays emanating from a sundisk representing the Aten.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.