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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Were the Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw people cannibals?
No, they were not historically and are not today.
If cannibalism was a form of death, was eating meat of other animals as well?
Not especially, no. The objects you see are used in ceremonies as a symbolic representation a person being reborn by entering the next stage of his or her life.
Was the Tánis ceremony a coming of age event?
The ceremony was for young men to be initiated into the community. In Native societies, there are and were a number of these secretive communities.
Was their secretive community like their version of the freemason?
They are similar in that they were secret, required special initiations, and were male-only. But beyond those general qualities, which apply to most groups that are classified as "secret," they don't share a connection. 
What does this mean? Why is there a cow on the bottom of the coffin?
That is the Apis bull which carried the mummy of Osiris on his back to Osiris’s son Horus. The idea is that the mummy (here Thothirdes) will be resurrected like Osiris was. The story of Osiris’s death and resurrection is a key concept in one of the foundational myths of the Ancient Egyptian religion, explaining how Osiris became the king of the Underworld after having been king on earth.
Tell me more about this, and are we sure it's a boy?
The flowers might sway modern people into thinking this is a girl, but flowers did not have the gendered connotations for the Ancient Egyptians that they do for Western society today. Flowers and vegetation were linked with rebirth and thus popular in Ancient Egyptian funerary imagery especially in the Roman Period.
And the work is Egyptian, not Greek?
Yes! The great thing about this portrait is that though the style is distinctively Greco-Roman; the purpose of this portrait was to be incorporated into the deceased's mummy. Fayum Portraits as a group are famous for their realism as well as their indication of the melding of cultures during the Roman period. In these later periods you'll see Egypt begin to look less "Egyptian."
Hi, I am in the Disguise exhibition. This work and the others by William Villalongo remind me of the German Dada artist Hannah Hoch's series "From an Ethnographic Museum." Do you know if Villalongo is referencing Hoch's work? This exhibition is amazing and thought-provoking, thanks!
Great connection! While I know that Villalongo is specifically interested in European modernity and appropriating African masks while removing their context, I can't be certain of the connection with Hoch. He's certainly aware of Dada and the broader language of European art history and I can see where their visual language overlaps. 
It's often times a simultaneously easy and difficult task to cite specific influences of artists when inspiration is so multivalent. I say, if you see a connection go with it! I think most artists in the exhibition are open to what the viewer brings to the work.
I agree about works being open to many connections. Thanks for your response! I think the ASK app is a great idea.
If I buy a ChimaTEK system, can I repeatedly replace my internalized characteristics in perpetuity, or can I only do it once?
You can only do it once, and you'll change during different stages in your life. Eventually, you'll become part of the landscape. 
ChimaTEK creates an "empathic" -- a  hybrid being of human, plant, and animal. Are there certain qualities you would want to keep or remove permanently? Or do you feel the need to constantly replace your internal characteristics?
I wouldn't say "constantly," but once in a while, sure. Like on a good Saturday night now and then!
I'm a little excited about becoming part of the landscape too, but until then, maybe I want to try a few things.
I'll have to come back and see the meditators. That must be something.
They will be here tomorrow if you're curious, for our First Saturday evening events. The museum is free from 5pm-11pm and there will be a performance using Saya Woolfalk's work beginning at 8:30 pm.
Tomorrow? Awesome.
What's the story here?
Hello! This Ode-Lay Mask by a Temne artist dates to the 1970s. It comes from the city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. At that time, kung-fu movies were a new and very popular genre, and likely captivated the artist responsible for this mask. Ode-Lay masquerade is rooted in contemporary urban culture, which is surprising to many visitors.
It's a great example of how masquerade is a living, constantly evolving tradition!
What does this mean? Why is he giving away money yet on the edge of the ledge?
 "Make it Rain" by the Zimbabwean artist Gerald Machona is a critique of hyperinflation, and cultural unrest going on in Zimbabwe thanks to the presidential administration.
Machona documented this  performance where he stood on rooftops and "rained" down Zimbabwean currency as a comment on Zimbabwean hyperinflation, destructive economic policies and the political repression of Robert Mugabe's presidency that created that environment.
My semiotics is rusty but how might Saussure or Peirce view these? Considering it's a cultural tradition often absent in their conversation.
Wow, big question! Truthfully, I'm not quite sure and you have me and my fellow  team member considering. Do you have any thoughts?
I think, considering Saussure who I am more familiar with, that he would be taken aback by these objects. The idea of icons being removed from their original context in Fernandes' work and Saussure's notions of self-referential language are in contrast with each other.
Yeah I agree with that. Probably for Peirce -- who rejects the idea of a static relationship b/w a sign and that which it represents -- these would be more relevant as he believed that signs are meaningful through recursive relationships in sets of three.
In the Oikonomos series, were any subjects harmed in the making of the photographs? How long did they have to have the bags on their head?
Wow, what an interesting question! No one was harmed, it's actually the artist himself--they're self-portraits. I'm not sure how long he stages each photograph for.
Wow that's so cool! We didn't even realize it was the same person in each picture
I know, right? I didn't either until the curator was giving us a walk-through. Because you see no skin, only that basic white button-down, it really could be anyone--and I think that makes Chagas' work even more powerful.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.