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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until fall 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Have small plates, dinner, or drinks at The Norm restaurant and bar, led by Michelin-starred Chef Saul Bolton. Or stop by the BKM Café or Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group.

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (The Norm restaurant and bar; BKM Café and Bowl)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

Is the hole in his head damage or symbolic of something?
Good eye! That hole shows the loss of a uraeus, which you will see in many other depictions of kings in the same spot on their head or headdress. The uraeus was a protective goddess in the form of a cobra, whose image was affixed to a variety of objects. Look for them as you explore! You can find many in those galleries.
How do you know this is Dionysus?
If you look closely at the figure's right shoulder, you can see hooves of a goat or sheep which indicates that it is a sheep or goat's skin that is draped across the torso. As you may have read in the label, during the Ptolemaic period Dionysus was conflated with the Egyptian god Osiris who's sacred animal was a ram.
The lighting in "The Dinner Party" makes the setting feel almost spiritual.
Very much so! The lighting is dramatic and also helps to conserve the work while it is on long-term view. These special lights don't emit any UV rays that could damage the many different materials of the installation
Is there maybe a spiritual significance for the triangle? It seems like there could be.
There certainly is! The triangle is an early symbol of women and the Goddess. The equilateral triangle emphasizes Judy Chicago's belief in equality for all people: there is no head of the table and all the guests sit together.
Cool, that's awesome. It certainly adds to the atmosphere in the room.
I think if I walked in and the shape was a giant circular or rectangular table I would probably feel differently about it. The plates seem to change too.
Exactly! I think the unusual shape of the table also grabs our interest. Judy Chicago has spoken about the increasing dimensionality of the plates, saying, "As the visitor circumnavigates the table, the butterfly form surges up dimensionally, symbolizing women's increased strides toward liberation from prehistory to the modern era."
That's a really beautiful statement. There is a lot of optimism in it for sure.
 Is "The Dinner Party" probably the most famous piece in this museum?
I'd say it's pretty famous! It definitely is one of our most popular works. People come from around the country and world to see it.
Cool, it's also my favorite so far!
Where can we find the living newspaper?
Welcome to Agitprop! The section about the "living newspapers" from the 1930s is along one wall, in cases and on the wall itself. Do you see the wheeled pedicab?
Yes I see the pedicab.
It's the long wall nearest to the pedicab and some of its posters on the wall read, "ONE THIRD OF A NATION."
Thank you!
You're welcome! I was surprised to see how relevant those issues still are -- for example, affordable housing in Manhattan/NYC! Lots of connections over the past century leading to the present! Let us know if there are other issues and objects that interest you as you go along.
Can you tell me about this?
Great find! Jungjin Lee's series is my favorite in the show and it is entitled "Unnamed Road."
Her prints are all hand-made and she goes through a rigorous printing process. She does not give any specific places as to where these "unnamed roads" may be and what we are looking at in her photographs. She has said of her work, "I am primarily concerned with the unconscious, the unknown, and the invisible."
Thank you. They have a desolate, haunting quality to me.
I absolutely agree. And I love how your silhouette reflected in the photo you sent me, as if you are there in that unnamed road. Equally haunting, I think.
I noticed that too. Thanks for your response!
You're very welcome. Enjoy the show! And get back to us with any other questions.
 I notice this is such a big family...or not especially so?
Hm, it is a large family certainly by my personal standards! To be honest with you, I'm not entirely sure what the average family size in Israel and the West Bank is. Throughout the exhibition there are many family portraits, some smaller and I think some even larger than this. I'm sure it varies just like it does here.
True, do you know if they are Israelis or Palestinians?
They live in Rehovot in Israel. They are not native Israelis but they are Jewish and they come from Yemen.
Thank you.
You're welcome!
Why is this blue part cut off? I'm guessing it wasn't like that originally? Was Jenny Holzer ok with the modification for the wall?
This work by Jenny Holzer was designed to be plastered on public walls, so cropping like this would have happened in its original iteration as well. Holzer has also made a number of projections that scroll or are naturally broken up by what they are being projected on. Cropping of one kind or another is actually a big part of her work and makes it seem ongoing or unlimited.
That's really interesting. Thanks!
No problem!
Love this!
Oh me too! It's such an amazing installation and those "ads" really stand out.
Dyke Action Machine! (DAM!) is a two-person public art project founded in 1991 by artist Carrie Moyer and photographer Sue Schaffner. Between 1991 and 2004 DAM! blitzed the streets of New York City with public art projects that combined Madison Avenue savvy with Situationist tactics so these campaigns would have been seen in and around NYC.
A typical DAM! campaign was comprised of 5,000 posters wheat pasted over the course of one month. I love it!
How did I miss that?!
That's one of the best things about politically engaged art, it's so site-specific and ephemeral. I think part of the point is that becomes known by word of mouth even if we miss seeing it personally. The bust of Edward Snowden is another good example of that!
Yes, it's so interesting.
Yes, so much of what we are lucky enough to see in Agitprop! was originally part of one-time demonstrations or short-lived events or even foreign movements. It's truly special to see so much in one place.
So true! Thanks!
What happened to this sheep?
This sheep is the subject of some kind of research or testing---the circle you see in its body is a window to its digestive tract so it can be studied.
Israel is a hub of scientific research and Martin Kollar focused on this angle while maintaining the maintaining the anonymity of the locations and keeping the subjects relatively anonymous.
Kollar highlights "unsettling mystery" in his Field Trip series.
Can you tell me more about this piece/artist? I can't seem to find any related signage.
This is by John Duggar (American) and Cecilia Vicuna (Chilean). Vicuna has been creating “precarious works”, ephemeral installations in nature, cities and museums since 1966, as a way of “hearing an ancient silence waiting to be heard.”
Vicuna is a poet, artist and activist. Her work addresses topics such as ecological destruction, cultural homogenization, and economic disparity, particularly the way in which such phenomena disenfranchise the already powerless.
This vest is a rendition of a banner that was hung after a military coup in Chile in 1973. She works with mixed media.
Does she work primarily with fiber and knitting?
Anything from fiber to metal-work, to paintings and drawings, really. She has mentioned in an interview that she wants her works to be multi-dimensional.
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.