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When you visit the Brooklyn Museum, you can use our app to ask us questions or chat about the artwork you see.

You’ll be connected with a team of art historians and educators who know our collection, can answer your questions, and can give you recommendations on what to see next. 

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Explore our permanent collection or a special exhibition on a guided group tour led by one of our friendly and experienced Museum Guides, or on your own with a self-guided group tour. These tours are for adult groups with at least 10 people, last about one hour, and can be tailored to meet the interests and needs of your group.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're renovating our second floor to bring you a better experience, which means the Libraries and Archives are closed to the public until spring 2017. If you're a researcher who would like to access our resources, send us an email and we'll do our best to assist you.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fifth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Fourth Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the Third Floor

Also on the Third Floor: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Our Second Floor galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Also on the Second Floor

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk on the first floor.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Parking
Parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays, there's a flat rate of $6 starting at 5 p.m. Park your bicycle in the rack behind the building, next to our sculpture garden.

Shopping
Our Shop offers an eclectic mix of gifts, jewelry, books, clothing, crafts, and foods from around Brooklyn and around the world. Shop hours

Dining
Stop by the BKM Café or BKM Bowl. Planning a group tour? Consider a catered lunch for your group. (Saul is temporarily closed to bring you an exciting new Brooklyn dining experience.)

Rest Rooms
Rest rooms are on the first and third floors (floor plan), are wheelchair accessible, and have baby-changing tables. A family rest room is located just off the main lobby.

Coat Check
A free coat check is available on the first floor, where you can leave any packages, large bags, umbrellas, or strollers.

Wheelchairs
Complimentary wheelchairs are available at the coat check on the first floor. Our entrances and rest rooms are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit our Accessibility page.

Strollers
You're welcome to use strollers throughout the building (although from time to time there are certain areas where we might need to restrict their use, on account of small spaces, especially fragile art, or other circumstances). If necessary, leave your stroller at the coat check.

Wireless Access
We offer free wireless access throughout our galleries and grounds. During your visit, we encourage you to switch to wifi (BrooklynMuseum) for faster download speeds. The wireless project was created by the Brooklyn Museum Technology Department, with help from NYCWireless.

Go Mobile
Need information on the go? Planning your next visit? Access www.brooklynmuseum.org from your mobile phone to view our mobile-friendly website.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

We're committed to making our galleries and facilities accessible to everyone.

  • We are fully wheelchair accessible. Check our online and printed floor plan for details.
  • If you need a wheelchair during your visit, they're available for free at the coat check in the lobby.
  • Companions of people with disabilities are admitted for free.
  • The parking lot behind the Museum is fully accessible. There's a free, 15-minute grace period for pickups and dropoffs.
  • If you need an assistive-listening device, they're available for free at our Admissions Desk, on the first floor.

We also offer a wide range of services for our visitors of all ages with special needs.

  • For those who have low or no vision, guided visits that include verbal descriptions can be scheduled for both adult and school groups, with advance notice. We also offer Sensory Tours, monthly public tours designed to accommodate and engage both sighted and non-sighted visitors. Verbal descriptions of collection highlights are available via Art Beyond Sight.
  • For those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, American Sign Language interpretation for both adult and school group tours can be arranged, with advance notice.
  • For those with intellectual disabilities or other special needs, we offer specially tailored guided gallery visits to adult and school groups.

We hope that you'll get in touch with us via email or at 718.501.6229 if you have questions about any of the above services, or if you'd like to make advance arrangements.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

No matter what your interest, there's a tour for you:

  • Join our Museum Guides for daily public tours (free with admission) focusing on a variety of themes, eras, and movements in art.
  • Book a group tour for ten or more adults.
  • Explore tours and programs for school groups, all designed to help students and teachers construct meaningful experiences with works of art.
ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

Exhibitions on the First Floor

Also on the First Floor

  • Admissions Desk
  • Museum Shop
  • Dining (Saul is temporarily closed. Stop by our BKM Café and Bowl.)

Rest rooms are on the first, second, and third floors; those on the first and third floors are wheelchair accessible. The second-floor rest rooms can be reached only via the stairs from the Schapiro Wing on the third floor. Water fountains are near the first- and third-floor rest rooms.

Pick up Assistive Listening Devices at the Admissions Desk.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

By Subway

2/3 to Eastern Parkway/Brooklyn Museum. Transfer to 2/3 from 4/5 (at Nevins Street) and B, D, Q, N, R, and LIRR (at Atlantic Terminal-Barclays Center). See a subway map. Make sure to check with the MTA for any service changes, especially on the weekend.


By Bus

The closest bus stops are:

B41 and B69 at Grand Army Plaza

B45 at St. Johns Place and Washington Avenue

Check with the MTA for the most up-to-date bus information.


By Car

From Manhattan:

Brooklyn Bridge; left at Tillary Street; right on Flatbush Avenue for about 1.5 miles to Grand Army Plaza; about 2/3 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at the first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue). Or: Manhattan Bridge enters directly onto Flatbush Avenue.

From Westchester, the Bronx, Queens, or Connecticut:

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Triborough) to Brooklyn Queens Express (BQE); Manhattan Bridge exit to Tillary Street; left onto Flatbush Avenue and proceed according to the directions from Manhattan.

From Staten Island and southern or central New Jersey:

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to Gowanus Expressway (Route 278 towards Manhattan); exit to 38th Street; left on Fourth Avenue for about 2 miles; right on Union Street; 5 blocks to Grand Army Plaza; go 1/2 around Plaza; right on Eastern Parkway. We're at first intersection (Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue).

From northern or north central New Jersey:

George Washington Bridge/Holland or Lincoln Tunnel to Manhattan; follow directions from Manhattan.

From Long Island:

Grand Central Parkway to Jackie Robinson Parkway; exit at Bushwick Avenue; left at third traffic light to Eastern Parkway; about 3 miles to Washington Avenue. We're across intersection at left.


Parking

On-site parking is available in the lot behind the Museum, off Washington Avenue. On Target First Saturdays there's a flat rate of $5 beginning at 5 p.m.


Bikes

Park your bicycle at the racks behind the Museum, next to the Sculpture Garden. Bikes are parked at your own risk; we don't accept responsibility for vandalism or theft.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.

ASK Brooklyn Museum Bloomberg Philanthropies

Here's what people are asking.

How did the Museum get the entire Jan Martense Schenck House?
The Brooklyn Museum dismantled the house from its original location, made detailed notes about the beams and structure, and had it brought in pieces to the museum. We actually removed two extra rooms to bring it to the structure it had in the 1730s.
One cool fact, is that the house used to be on the 4th Floor, where the Dinner Party is now in the Sackler Center. So we dismantled it again, when the Sackler Center was formed, and moved it to its current location, about ten years ago.
And we have the rest of the roof in storage, so if we find another location with higher ceilings, we can put the rafters back up.
Where was the Rockefeller House located in New York City?
The house was located at 4 West 54th Street in Manhattan. The Moorish room was actually where the sculpture garden at MoMA is today!
The house was the standard size of a townhouse in that area although there was not much around the area at the time. New York was just beginning to be built up in the 1860s and the more north you went, the more rural it was still.
Is the corn real or fake?
The corn kernels are real and the work includes a lot of ground corn meal mixed in, too. Behind that surface, the giant disc is fiberglass and it can actually be de-assembled into two pieces.
This is my favorite sculpture of all time. Does the museum have more sculptures from this artist?
That is a very popular sculpture among visitors! There are no other sculptures by Gaston Lachaise in the museum's collection, but there is a drawing, which currently is not on view.
What is this? And, can I buy one of my own?
This is a contemporary piece by Fred Wilson called "Iago's Mirror." While living in Venice, the artist was inspired by the local glassmaking traditions and by 18th century design. Also, he did produce it in an edition of six, this is number five, so perhaps you could track down and purchase one of the remaining five!
Are there other mirrors from the 18th century in black like this in the museum?
There are other 18th century mirrors on that wall, if you look up a bit.
None are originally black. maybe oxidized?
No, actually, making the work all black was an innovation of Wilson's. The 5 ornate mirrors of diminishing size are painted black, rather than backed with the silvering that would make them reflective, and then fused together one atop the other. The formal device of black glass is often used to represent Africa and “blackness” in Wilson’s work. The black glass has the added dimension of being reflective.
Wilson has made several works referring to characters in Shakespeare's Othello (Iago is the main antagonist in this play). Wilson is African-American and he's very interested in exploring themes of African-American identity. Here is a quote from Wilson about the Othello reference:
"For Othello, largeness, beauty, and power together form a double-edged sword. People are afraid of power but Iago’s jealousy was so huge that he got around his own fear and destroyed Othello from the inside out. That is what 'Iago’s Mirror' is about: this is Iago looking at himself as Othello; love and hate mixed with his own jealous ego."
Was this really painted by Tiffany? As in the glass artist?
Yes! This was indeed painted by Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany & Co. As a young man, Louis traveled the world to study art and absorb the culture of other countries. Tiffany based this work on photographs he made in 1871, just two years after the completion of the Suez Canal had stimulated new interest in Egypt and the Middle East. 
But this Louis designed the famous lamps, right?
Yes, Louis later became a renowned designer and ran a large interior decorating firm. He and his staff designed those famous stained glass lamps and other glass art later in his career. If you would like to see examples of these, we have some in our Decorative Arts collection on the 4th floor (especially in the Luce Visible Storage space).
ASK App ASK Team

Curious about how we developed ASK Brooklyn Museum? The project team is blogging regularly on BKM Tech, and we've open sourced our code on Github.